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Old September 24, 2012, 08:07 PM   #1
El suave
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.260

I have been reading alot on this round I know its a .308 necked down and alot of people like it better than the .308 but the claims are shooting 1000yrds with the lighter 129grn bullet is this possiable
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Old September 24, 2012, 08:42 PM   #2
Doyle
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2 things - 1st they generaly aren't using a 129 grn to shoot 1000 yds. The bullet of choice for the 1000 yd shooters with a 6.5mm is anywhere from 140 to 150+ grns. 2nd, those super-long 6.5mm bullets have the highest BC of any bullet generally available. So, when you compare a .308 to .260 you have the same powder capacity shooting a much higher BC bullet. That equates to a lot of retained speed at long distances.
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Old September 24, 2012, 08:45 PM   #3
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Yes. Sniper and distance shooting dedicated forums have all kinds of threads about the .260 reaching 1000 yds.
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Old September 25, 2012, 05:46 AM   #4
trg42wraglefragle
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1000yards is easily achievable with .260rem,
.308 can manage it too.
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Old September 25, 2012, 09:11 AM   #5
kraigwy
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The 260 is going to be the next rifle I build. That is after I find a Model 70 action.

Doesn't have the recoil of my 300 WM 1000 yard gun.

It would be lighter then my 30-06 target rifle.

Better barrel life the the 243.

Better BC then the 308.

I think the 270 Win would be a better long range gun now that you can find match bullets for it...............but I already have a 270 Wn in a Model 70.

Taking all above into account, the 260 has to be my next Model 70.
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Old September 25, 2012, 10:23 AM   #6
shane256
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I got a .260 Remington rifle four years ago. A few trips to the range and it's all I've carried into the woods for the past four years. It has light recoil (I use 140gr bullets because I like heavy for game bullets) and is flat deadly on deer (all I've used it on besides paper so far) with none I've shot running over 30yds from where I shot it, none have left my sight. I use simple factory loaded 140gr Core-Lokts. Entrance wounds are .264" and exits are about the size of a nickel. I've never recovered a bullet and once it went through both shoulders and the near side leg bone. Using 120gr bullets, it's up near 2950fps. The 140s are around 2750fps and shoot a little flatter than 180gr in .30-06 using just Core-Lokts in both.

I have both .30-06 and .270Win rifles and none of those have been into the woods with me since I got my .260.

If you get into long range shooting, to equal the BC of the 140s in 6.5mm you have to go to around 168gr in 7mm and 190gr+ in .30cal... both corresponding to more recoil to get the same MV. Of course, .338" has some really insane BC bullets (the new 300gr Accubond has a BC of over .700! and the 300gr match bullets are 1.0+!) but you're talking some serious recoil to get those out at 2700+fps MV.

As far as comparing the .260 to the .308 at 1000yds, "The Monograph" paper said that the 6.5 Grendel penetrated at 1000yds better than the 7.62x51 and the .260 is the big brother to the 6.5 Grendel (roughly 300fps faster with 120gr bullets) (here's that paper: http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc...f&AD=ADA512331 the 'alternate calibers' part starts around page 30)
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Old September 25, 2012, 04:22 PM   #7
btmj
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Kraig -

Have you had a chance to examine any of the new 0.277 match bullets available? Are they 150 grain, or heavier than 150 grain?

I have not seen any yet. Just curious on your thoughts.

Jim
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Old September 25, 2012, 05:05 PM   #8
mnhntr
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My .260 handloads will do 1000+ yds better (trajectory and wind) than most factory 300win mag loads. They also have more energy past 1000yds than the win mag.
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Old September 25, 2012, 09:01 PM   #9
warbirdlover
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I can't find any factory loads for this so it would not be for me. I sold all my reloading equipment.
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Old September 26, 2012, 07:31 AM   #10
Doyle
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Quote:
I can't find any factory loads for this so it would not be for me. I sold all my reloading equipment.
Where are you looking? You can get fine .260 factory loads at almost all of the on-line retailers.
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Old September 26, 2012, 08:02 AM   #11
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At $2-$3 /round for .260 factory ammo, you'd be nutz to buy a rifle chambered for that unless you handload.

Supply and demand at work...
You can buy FGMM and Black Hills in .308 for $10-$15 less per box than .260...
They charge more, because they manufacture far less.

There's only a handful of "match" .260 factory loads. If your rifle doesn't like any of them, you're screwed. That's why the .308 is often the best choice for those that don't handload (though if you shoot long range, there's no excuse for not reloading)
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Old September 26, 2012, 12:15 PM   #12
mightyoakwildlife
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I own rifles in both chamberings. I shoot both calibers well, and wouldn't feel handicapped with either choice afield. Both serve admirably well, and "real world" experience doesn't favor one over the other, unless you exercise an active persuit in marksmanship.

If you are (or become) serious enough to notice the differences, then you will end up making a decision based not on the relatively small increase in cost per-round, but the subtle yet worthwhile little gains in ballistics. Chances are good that by then, you will handload, and find the .260 to be even more frugal to shoot than the .308.

Talks about advantages of one caliber over the other, when fired at distance, should only be held after gaining competency at that distance. We all enjoy debating the virtues of one over the other, but very few of us have the personal experience to base our arguements upon.

Be honest with yourself... consider what you will actually use the rifle for, how often and how far you will really be shooting, then take your pick. Both are great choices, and you will be convinced that you made the perfect choice, or you'll end up owning and shootin them both. Either way, you win.
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Old September 26, 2012, 12:41 PM   #13
603Country
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I have a 260 and I really like the rifle and caliber. But if you don't reload, you probably shouldn't buy a 260. As for factory ammo cost, I just looked at one catalog and they showed Remington ammo for the 260 at $35 a box and 308 ammo of the same quality at $37 a box. Of course you can get 308 ammo just about anywhere but your wife's beauty shop, but that isn't the case for the 260. That get's me to wondering if there's a beauty shop here in Texas that actually carries a selection of ammo. Hmmmm. Bound to be...
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Old September 26, 2012, 12:48 PM   #14
Saltydog235
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I own rifles in both chamberings. I shoot both calibers well, and wouldn't feel handicapped with either choice afield. Both serve admirably well, and "real world" experience doesn't favor one over the other, unless you exercise an active persuit in marksmanship.

Quote:
If you are (or become) serious enough to notice the differences, then you will end up making a decision based not on the relatively small increase in cost per-round, but the subtle yet worthwhile little gains in ballistics. Chances are good that by then, you will handload, and find the .260 to be even more frugal to shoot than the .308.

Talks about advantages of one caliber over the other, when fired at distance, should only be held after gaining competency at that distance. We all enjoy debating the virtues of one over the other, but very few of us have the personal experience to base our arguements upon.

Be honest with yourself... consider what you will actually use the rifle for, how often and how far you will really be shooting, then take your pick. Both are great choices, and you will be convinced that you made the perfect choice, or you'll end up owning and shootin them both. Either way, you win.
Ah, the old just because it can will you be able to argument. Rationale, real world applications and sensibility have no place here.

There are quite a few people in here I'm sure that have long distance experience and do quite well. However, a practical chambering such as the .308 would serve the majority so much better. There's a whole lot of difference in a quality repeatable set up for distance than the off the shelf rifle and scope available to most budgets.
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Old September 26, 2012, 01:00 PM   #15
GeauxTide
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Have two 260s. The first reloads through them averaged .6". I absolutely love the 260. Recoil is much lighter than a 308. Targets, deer, and hogs - perfection.
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Old September 26, 2012, 01:48 PM   #16
shane256
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Yeah... availability of factory ammo isn't a big deal for me anymore. I almost never buy any locally anyway because it's more expensive than online. Yeah, it's bad for brick-n-mortar shops but the big box stores already kill them off already. The only thing is that you have to remember to buy it a week before you need it and not forget it when you leave on a trip
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Old September 26, 2012, 06:26 PM   #17
hodaka
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I think that it is hard to justify not reloading if you shoot any volume of centerfire ammo.
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Old September 26, 2012, 08:02 PM   #18
mightyoakwildlife
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Quote:
I think that it is hard to justify not reloading if you shoot any volume of centerfire ammo.
BINGO! You've just eliminated all the arguements relating to ammo cost, lack of availability, selection, match-grade ammo, etc.
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Old September 27, 2012, 05:11 AM   #19
stubbicatt
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Can't shoot 260 in Palma!

Yep. 308's with 155 grain bullets to 1000...

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