The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Hunt

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old September 17, 2012, 11:00 AM   #1
Wild Bill Bucks
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 28, 2005
Location: Southeastern Oklahoma, Next door to Sasquatch
Posts: 1,265
It could save your life.

I'm re-doing my survival pack so I can get fresh batteries, food, ect. My worst case scenario would be, truck trouble in the middle of an area, where I might have to stay for several days to be found, or have to walk out if necessary. Weather could be 20 degrees to 100 degrees depending on time of year. I'm trying to keep weight down to around 40 lbs for carrying, and a pack around 2 ft x 2 ft in size for easy storage in my truck or car.

Here's my list:


GPS unit or at least a good compass (State road map if possible)

LED Flashlight with extra batteries (Because the light will last longer)

Fishing line with hooks and weights

Knife with sharpening stone ( Large enough to make into a spear)

Roll of strong nylon cord

Lightweight tarp

Short hatchet

Small First aid kit with antibiotic cream

2 Bic lighters with some kind of fire starter

Extra Sweat suit with socks and Boots

Extra Jacket or coat depending on climate

Blanket

Rain suit

Water purification tablets

Good canteen ( Preferably metal for boiling water)

2- 32oz bottles of water

2 packages vacuum sealed jerky

Roll of duct tape

.22 caliber youth rifle with ammo (preferably a 2 piece for easy carrying)

Waterproof Back pack to carry all of this stuff

How many of you guys pack a survival kit and freshen it up yearly, and am I missing something obvious?
With hunting season right around the corner, I just thought it might be worth mentioning. ( And maybe I'm watching to much "Survivor Man")
Wild Bill Bucks is offline  
Old September 17, 2012, 11:52 AM   #2
chewie146
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 25, 2010
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 853
I didn't see space blanket on there. That canteen can be a water-filtering unit that can be used in conjunction with the tablets for good water. Instead of a flashlight, I'd consider an LED head lamp. Hands free=good.
chewie146 is offline  
Old September 17, 2012, 12:20 PM   #3
SerenityNetworks
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2012
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 318
I'll need to pull my list from home later tonight or tomorrow, but off-the-top-of-my-head...
- Emergency (space) blankets (at least 4). Three should be pre-taped together into a tube with foil tape. This makes a very nice tube tent.
- Water filter (in addition to the purification tablets).
- Your nylon cord should be paracord.
- If you are really concerned about the need for food then I'd suggest adding two or three 110 Conibear traps.
- Your first aid considerations seem light. I would add some trauma treatment materials, as trauma may be the reason for being stranded. (Chest Seal, Thoracic Needle, Bandages, etc.)
- You didn't mention the scenarios you might be engaging in - are you hunting, driving in remote areas, bear country, etc.? Check some of the off-road motorcycle forums. They have some well thought out emergency kit postings.
- Medicines: Any critical prescriptions you may need. Also, Benadryl, Asperin, some strong (prescription) pain medicines, a prescription for a wide spectrum antibiotic.
- Insect wipes
- Sunscreen
- Flare
- Esbit or Coghlans 9565 fuel tablets

I need to get back to work. I'll post back with my personal list as soon as I am able.

Regards,
Andrew
____________________________________
NRA Life Member
There are some ideas so preposterous that only an intellectual will believe them. - Malcolm Muggeridge
SerenityNetworks is offline  
Old September 17, 2012, 04:39 PM   #4
2damnold4this
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 12, 2009
Location: Athens, Georgia
Posts: 1,408
How about a way to call for help? How about a plan letting a friend know where you will be and when to expect your return?
2damnold4this is offline  
Old September 17, 2012, 06:42 PM   #5
grubbylabs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 11, 2009
Location: Hansen Idaho
Posts: 1,442
so far your list seems fine, but I also like the idea of having a water purifier. As far as the first aid kit goes, I would not pack any thing you do not know how to use. I use to drive around southern California with a well stocked ambulance and rarely if ever did I need much more than basic first aid stuff such as a role of gauze and 4x4 dressings. And yes I went to quite a few shootings and stabbings.
__________________
* (Swinging club) Whack! whack! whack! *

Nope, the old nag's still dead .
(Capt Charlie)
grubbylabs is offline  
Old September 17, 2012, 09:28 PM   #6
SerenityNetworks
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2012
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 318
I agree with grubbylabs; certainly you don't want to pack something you don't know how to use. It sounds like he is a First Responder and thus has likely spent many more hours in an ambulance than I have as an RN (or even as an old Funeral Director when Funeral Directors provided ambulance service). But I do have a rationale for the medical supplies I suggested.

You stated a case where you might need to survive for several days. In my (very limited) time in an ambulance, interventions were for the short-term; with the intent that the victim would be in the ER within 15 minutes. For example, if a person had a sucking check wound it was quite unlikely a chest tube would ever need to be inserted in the ambulance, as the person would likely live long enough to get to the hospital without it. If you've shot yourself or been shot in the field, that is unlikely you will even receive first responder treatment in 15 minutes; thus, considerations change from what I would expect for an incident in the community.

Let me also say that as an RN, I will defer to the judgement of a First Responder in these matters most of the time. I may have a 'higher' license than most responders, but I would be stupid not to consider their greater experience in this type situation.

For the first aid items I mentioned earlier, here is my rationale:
  • Benadryl - If I walk into bees or the like then I want something to mitigate the histamine reaction. Take it as recommended on the label.
  • Aspirin - If I suspect I'm having a heart attack. Take is as recommended.
  • Pain Medicine - Speak with your doctor about getting an emergency pain medicine. For myself I carry Tramadol; not too strong, not too weak. Common traumas are sprains and breaks. A moderate pain killer can let me function enough to care for myself.
  • Antibiotic - Speak with your doctor about getting a starter dose of a wide spectrum antibiotic. Open and unclean wounds are likely with any serious trauma in the field. If you are out stranded for even a day, the infection can be serious.
  • Your own prescriptions - If you take prescription medications, be sure to have some in your emergency kit.
  • Chest wound barrier - With a sucking chest wound, tension pneumothorax is commonly fatal. As an RN or for someone that obtains training, I prefer a pure chest seal and a decompression needle. For others I would recommend carrying something like a HALO Chest Seal (with vent tab) or Bolin Chest Seal. In the unfortunate event of this type of wound, the odds are not good, but without a chest seal they are much worse. A chest wound barrier can also be used on open wounds elsewhere, although they shouldn't be placed to make the covering air-tight. Also, layman training in the use of chest seals can be found in most communities if you call around.
That's my 2ยข on medications and the chest seal. When I get more time, I'll type up my kit's non-medicinal contents, along with items I'm considering adding or have decided to add.

Regards,
Andrew

PS. I used to consider carrying a clotting agent (ex: Celox). But on the advice of some First Responders and a physician, I am not doing so. I've come to the conclusion that clotting agent use belongs in the realm of the military, with trained and experienced responders. For trauma that results in blood loss that would be helped by a clotting agent I would probably not be able to apply it myself and would likely die anyway. Use of a clotting agent in an inappropriate situation is likely to cause more harm than good. For blood loss, pressure remains king.
__________________
NRA Life Member
There are some ideas so preposterous that only an intellectual will believe them. - Malcolm Muggeridge
SerenityNetworks is offline  
Old September 17, 2012, 11:01 PM   #7
ZeroJunk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 14, 2006
Location: Browns Summit NC
Posts: 2,507
I don't normally take anything I don't always have on me except something to drink and maybe a sandwich.


Where are ya'll going ?
ZeroJunk is offline  
Old September 17, 2012, 11:16 PM   #8
grubbylabs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 11, 2009
Location: Hansen Idaho
Posts: 1,442
I don't disagree with your reasoning behind packing chest injury stuff, and I certainly do not mean to insult any one or imply that I am some kind of official authority, I was just trying to speak from some experience.

My opinion is that if someone who knows how to use that equipment is present, then they will likely know how to make due with what they have at hand. There are loads of items that can be made into an occlusive dressing. All we used was a piece of 4X4 petroleum gauze.

Or they can figure out a way to decompress a chest. But if a person is not trained on how to vent a chest dressing or if and when you should, you can cause just as much harm. I just feel that having basic stuff that a person knows how to use is more beneficial than them trying to remember if they saw that particular procedure on their favorite drama.

I would recommend that any one who goes into the back country take some survival classes and first aid classes, it could save your or a family members life.

Your meds with the exception of antibiotics are what I recommend as well.

especially if you take meds on a regular basis. Be sure to update the meds regularly and keep them safe, consult with a pharmacist on how to safely store your meds and on how often you should change out your emergency stash with fresh meds. I would even imagine that if they are non narcotic and you have a good relation ship with your pharmacist and doc they will likely help you with this as far as reminders and selling you extra.

After thinking about it I would also include a Topo map of the area as well as a good compass, the basic square one is best, and a quality one will also include instruction which for some could be handy. A two way radio and GPS. My personal favorite is the Garmin Rhino because it is a radio and GPS all in one. Often times your local SAR folks will have similar radios that have overlapping frequencies.

As far as clothing goes I would change out clothing with the seasons and remember that you are still dealing with the elements, so having weather resistant clothing is still important. I would not pack extra cotton clothing.

As far as food goes I carry Kipper snacks or sardines because I am not likely to open those after I eat the PB and J and realize that I am still hungry. Aside from a good source of sodium and protein, they can usually be found packed is water.

Hope that helps.
__________________
* (Swinging club) Whack! whack! whack! *

Nope, the old nag's still dead .
(Capt Charlie)
grubbylabs is offline  
Old September 17, 2012, 11:52 PM   #9
big al hunter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 12, 2011
Location: Washington state
Posts: 957
Take a bic lighter and dunk it under water for 2 seconds. Try to light it!......then go get a magnesium and flint type fire starter and carry that with some cotton balls soaked in melted petroleum jelly. Starts every time. Even when sopping wet. Burns long enough to start wood shavings and small tinder. You are most likely to need fire when your the wettest you have ever been in the worst weather for staying warm.
__________________
You can't fix stupid....however ignorance can be cured through education!
big al hunter is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 12:06 AM   #10
Water-Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 23, 2008
Location: N. Georgia
Posts: 1,612
signaling mirror
__________________
Vietnam Veteran
1964 - 1965
Water-Man is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 07:42 AM   #11
SerenityNetworks
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2012
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 318
Dear Grubbylabs,

I absolutely did not take any offense at your post; it did not even cross my mind. I pray you took none with mine. I do think of First Responders as experts and always listen. Given a nurse versus a Paramedic/EMT (or similar) at the scene of an injury, I would opt for the care of the First Responder any day of the week. I only disagree with you on the antibiotics. For everything else, I agree with your opinions and rationales 100%, including the use of an occlusive dressing - and you stated it much more clearly than me - especially about using what you have and only using what you have training to use. (With the prevalence these days of civilian classes, hunters should be training, IMHO, especially those that frequent ranges.) Similar to you, all I ever used was an abdominal pad coated with petroleum jelly. My only thinking on the 'super stick' pads is simply space limitation. I want to keep my emergency kit to the size of a small camera bag that I wear on my belt with every outing.

Regarding the antibiotic, I do understand that 90% of physicians would likely agree with you; for several very good reasons. Yet I was once out in the field once for a few days. I received a small, deep, wound on my knuckles in the morning. I even thought the wound was "clean". I treated it and bandaged it. By evening there was redness surrounding the wound for about an inch. I marked it with a pen before going to bed, so I could tell in the morning if it was spreading or shrinking. In the morning I had solid redness to the wrist and streaks to my shoulder. I didn't even bother to break camp. I just went straight to the doctor. After a couple of shots of "liquid fire" (Rocephin) in the butt, a prescription, and packing of the wound (ouch), I was good to go. If I had been in the situation where I was injured and stranded then I could have been in tough shape. But all that said, I would not suggest carrying antibiotics without a proper prescription and instructions from a physician. Fortunately, I had one that agreed with me and trusts me not to take it unless the signs of an infection are present.

On the topic of fire:
Last fall I ran across the suggestion 'big al' had on the cotton balls soaked in petroleum jelly. Whoa! Does that really work. (They didn't teach us that one in Scouts.) I carry the fuel cubes in the trunk and with my camping gear. But in my emergency kit is the magnesium fire starter (I got for a couple dollars at meritline . com) and petroleum jelly cotton balls stuffed into a straw cut in half. I just stuffed the saturated cotton balls into the straw and then used an iron to melt/seal the ends of the straw. Sealing the straw keeps the goo out of my kit.

Well, I'm rambling again. I'll quit.

Regards,
Andrew
__________________
NRA Life Member
There are some ideas so preposterous that only an intellectual will believe them. - Malcolm Muggeridge
SerenityNetworks is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 08:50 AM   #12
Wild Bill Bucks
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 28, 2005
Location: Southeastern Oklahoma, Next door to Sasquatch
Posts: 1,265
All good posts. I had thought about mag sticks, but I kept burning my nose while lighting my cigar. All my stuff is in plastic bags to avoid moisture. Adding to many things would create more weight. I have had First Aid training, and what I find is that, if you don't know how to use it, then forget it. I can wrap gauze around a pretty good sized wound and get by, and if you were by yourself, and you have a gaping chest wound, your pretty much done for anyway.

My kit is not meant for Total survival, but just some things that if you use your brain, and a bit of luck, you can improve your chances of staying alive in a bind.

Three Rivers and Honobia refuge have several areas that are 20 miles square, without a house or road in sight. I have had to use my survival kit only once when I got trapped by flooding rain, and got my truck stuck, and leaving was not an option.(That's when I found out that a cell phone is not a very good emergency plan)
I was only there for three days, but by having the stuff in my truck, I was able to stay pretty comfortable until the flooding creeks went down, and someone came along to give me a hand. Since then my kit goes everywhere I go, especially on my four wheeler.

The water purification thing is a good idea, I hadn't thought of, and at the time, I had not thought of packing any kind of food, hence the packed jerky.
It might not be much, but it is something.
Wild Bill Bucks is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 09:14 AM   #13
kraigwy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 16, 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 9,549
I use to do a lot of "survival training" when I was in the NG in Alaska, spent a lot of time winter camping in sub zero temps.

Because I'm lazy I'm an artist when it comes to "light weight"

Candles, dump the battery operated crap, batteries suck when it gets cold. Good compass and map work in heat or cold.

You can get by with an army style canteen and canteen cup. Just don't carry water in the canteen if its extremely cold. Normally then you have snow for water. I like the arctic canteen. Keeps stuff hot. Fill it with coffee in the morning and it will last you until your noon stop. The old army mess kit is good too. I would pre-mix flour, baking soda, etc and have pan fired bread.

I normally carried a little white gas MSR stove. Even with an extra fuel bottle it doesn't weigh much and two small bottles of white gas last a long time. Propane stoves suck in the winter. Propane freezes.

Packages of oak meal is great. Coffee and tea bags are light. Coffee is good but when you get stressed tea works better.

I have a light weight tent that weighs about 3 lbs. My sleeping bag weighs less then 7. Kept me warm at 70 below.

I'm a smoker, so always have bic lighters and never had a problem keeping them dry. Besides that I have wax coated "strike anywhere" matches but never had to use them

A tuna fish size can to use as a small stove works great, it can be tied on the out side of the pack. It is also used for your candle. You'd be surprised how much a candle will warm up a little tent is a short time so you can get dressed in the morning.

I carried a few small rocks. Before I turn in at night I'd heat the rocks and put them in my boots, stuffing a sock in each to hold the heat in. Now you have dry boots come morning.

I never felt the need for carrying a heavy sheaf knife or ax. Always got by fine with a Case three blade (stockmans), knife, with the main blade about 2 1/2 inches.

Couple pair of socks, changing them often, putting the pair you just took on inside your shirt to dry out. All I carried for first aid is a military bandage and aspirin.

You'd be surprised how comfortable you can stay. My winter pack weighed only about 30 lbs.

You don't need a huge camp fire. As I said a candle in a small tent will warm you up. You'll burn up more energy keeping a camp fire going then the benefit it provides.

Yeah if you want, and there is a lot of fuel have one, they are nice to stir into but no necessary.

You'd be surprised where you can find food. We took a hundred mile cross country ski trip west of Kotz one year. We came across some native wolf trap where the natives killed and hung a caribou over the trap. So we cut off some steaks and had a good meal.

Even in extreme cold you're going to find open water. When winter sets in and the creeks freeze over, the water level drops. You'll find the ice cover broken in places and have running water underneath. I carry some fishing line and a couple of Mepps OO Spinners, dropping them in the water and letting the current work the spinners. Fish are hungry this time of year and are easy to catch.

I've always carried a revolver, same as my CC. Nothing more then a small J frame w/LSWC 38s. Could always pick up a rabbit for the spit.

I didn't do my winter camping for survival, I did it for fun and I stayed comfortable.

I got old and moved to Wyoming. The same set up works here too. I like taking my little set up out on the prairie and watching the stars and listening to coyotes just for kicks. Now I carry a little MSR white gas stove for making my coffee.
__________________
Kraig Stuart
CPT USAR Ret
USAMU Sniper School Oct '78
Distinguished Rifle Badge 1071
kraigwy is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 09:23 AM   #14
bcarver
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 22, 2007
Location: Jackson,Mississippi
Posts: 836
fishing hooks

hooks and line would be one of the last things I would use. If you are gonna carry a hatchet get a gerber with a saw in the handle. Lots of paracord. A sling for a broke arm and a crutch are two likely things you will need to make.
A whistle would be handy to get help. It is much louder than yelling.
bcarver is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 09:41 AM   #15
grubbylabs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 11, 2009
Location: Hansen Idaho
Posts: 1,442
If it is mainly for your truck I would even consider leaving a couple of cans of soup or stew in there. If you have to leave your truck you do not have to take the cans with you, however if you do and they are empty (and you are now full)they might come in handy as other survival tools.

The maid reason I like a purifier is that it usually does not run out. You can use it multiple times and they are usually meant for back packing so they are light and easy to carry. I have carried one for the past few years while hiking and hunting and I can tell you it is nice to only have to carry one thing of water and know that I can refile it at my convenience.
__________________
* (Swinging club) Whack! whack! whack! *

Nope, the old nag's still dead .
(Capt Charlie)
grubbylabs is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 10:19 AM   #16
BlueTrain
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 26, 2005
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 5,825
You fellows must live in the wide open spaces. I can't think of any place within a hundred miles of here where a twenty-mile walk wouldn't bring me to a general store or 7-Eleven. That isn't to say I can't think of places where I can avoid people all day long if I want.

I generally mention in threads like this, here and elsewhere, that the greatest danger in the woods, especially when the grounds isn't exactly perfectly flat, is falling. You probably won't break anything but the heavier your pack is, the easier it is to fall. Even so, for walks in the woods, I take the same thing if I'm only going no more than a mile from home, which is about all I do anymore, that I do if I'm exploring the mountaintops above Front Royal, which is to say, not a whole lot.

I do carry first aid stuff, rarely used, a pot, because that's the one thing that's hardest to improvise, and a few other odds and ends, depending on the season. I have a variety of knives that I sometimes take along but I don't think I've ever used one for anything. One has to learn to do without things. It makes everything so much simpler.
__________________
Shoot low, sheriff. They're riding Shetlands!
Underneath the starry flag, civilize 'em with a Krag,
and return us to our own beloved homes!
Buy War Bonds.
BlueTrain is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 10:34 AM   #17
kraigwy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 16, 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 9,549
Quote:
I can't think of any place within a hundred miles of here where a twenty-mile walk wouldn't bring me to a general store or 7-Eleven.
Bit different in Wyoming.
__________________
Kraig Stuart
CPT USAR Ret
USAMU Sniper School Oct '78
Distinguished Rifle Badge 1071
kraigwy is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 11:08 AM   #18
SerenityNetworks
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2012
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueTrain View Post
You fellows must live in the wide open spaces. I can't think of any place within a hundred miles of here where a twenty-mile walk wouldn't bring me to a general store or 7-Eleven.
That's me too. I'm not hunting or fishing in Wyoming. I don't go four-wheeling in West Texas.

I believe this goes to the point that your kit(s) need to be customized to your situation. My kit is provisioned for the situation where I am hurt so badly I can't walk out. I'm rarely more than 5 miles from the car and likely never more than 10. My priorities will be to take care of the injury, stay warm, stay hydrated, and get help. My spouse always knows the areas where I will be located and when. If there is a cell signal then I text her updates. We have an agreed upon time for her to call for help if I don't check in. If I'm injured so bad I can't get to the car then I just need to stay alive until help arrives.

I do commonly go out of cell signal reach, but I have considered getting and packing one of those 30+ mile FRS radios.

Andrew
____________________________________
NRA Life Member
There are some ideas so preposterous that only an intellectual will believe them. - Malcolm Muggeridge
SerenityNetworks is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 11:53 AM   #19
grubbylabs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 11, 2009
Location: Hansen Idaho
Posts: 1,442
We have vast wilderness areas out here where you could literally be lost for days and not see civilization, no matter how straight a line you walk. Not to mention we have some patches of timber that are so think you would have a hard time seeing the sky through from the bottom let alone the top.
__________________
* (Swinging club) Whack! whack! whack! *

Nope, the old nag's still dead .
(Capt Charlie)
grubbylabs is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 11:56 AM   #20
scottycoyote
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 19, 2005
Location: southwestern va
Posts: 678
one thing, it might already be in your first aid kit, is some type of bloodclotter bandage.
__________________
"i got the most powerful gun in the world........an .88 magnum. It shoots thru schools......"
scottycoyote is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 12:00 PM   #21
SerenityNetworks
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2012
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 318
Grubbylabs, I just saw you are from Pocatello. I lived there when I was a kid. The wilderness there is drop-dead beautiful. Your survival kit will certainly need to be quite a bit more robust than mine - especially in winter. Also, I'd have no idea how to prepare for bears. For the most part, all I need to worry about are snakes and my .40 with a shot shell takes care of that threat pretty handily.

____________________________________
NRA Life Member
There are some ideas so preposterous that only an intellectual will believe them. - Malcolm Muggeridge
SerenityNetworks is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 12:06 PM   #22
grubbylabs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 11, 2009
Location: Hansen Idaho
Posts: 1,442
depending on where you are at bears might not be a problem. I have seen one bear around the Pocatello area but there are definitely other areas where it is a bigger problem. For the most part it is avoidance. If you are in bear country while they are awake it is easy for the most part to recognize bear sign and steer clear of them. Unless I had a good hunting rifle or my archery set up, I would not consider one survival food. That's what the tree rats are for.

But any way I just moved out past Burley a few weeks ago so I have to update my info.
__________________
* (Swinging club) Whack! whack! whack! *

Nope, the old nag's still dead .
(Capt Charlie)
grubbylabs is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 12:18 PM   #23
BlueTrain
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 26, 2005
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 5,825
I may have been exaggerating slightly when I say "there is no place," for there probably is. Still, the East is what my father would have called "thickly settled," at least in most places. But get a little further than my completely arbitrary 100 mile radius and there are places where you could easily get lost (or stay hid) for longer than you'd want (or for as long as you want). But the dangers are also easily exaggerated, though hardly non-existant. Personal carelessness is probably the greatest danger, from falls and whatnot. If you are thinking of a place where you're likely not to run into another soul, then the danger from other people would have to be close to zero. Animal dangers vary widely of course but I always suspect claims about packs of wild dogs.

There are places where private planes have gone down and not been found for a few days but unless you're flying, you probably wouldn't be there either.

By the way, I consider twenty miles to be a nice day hike for about a ten hour day if there's no snow on the ground. If you had a busted knee or a turned ankle, it would no longer be a nice day.
__________________
Shoot low, sheriff. They're riding Shetlands!
Underneath the starry flag, civilize 'em with a Krag,
and return us to our own beloved homes!
Buy War Bonds.
BlueTrain is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 12:31 PM   #24
SerenityNetworks
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2012
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 318
With the advent of leased land, I was priced out of hunting on farmland. My option is to hunt on public lands. My greatest risk, outside a fall, is probably getting shot by someone not aware of what's behind their intended target. I've never heard the zip of a bullet going by, but I've been peppered by shot more than once. I do my best to be visible to hunters, but...

____________________________________
NRA Life Member
There are some ideas so preposterous that only an intellectual will believe them. - Malcolm Muggeridge
SerenityNetworks is offline  
Old September 18, 2012, 12:41 PM   #25
ZeroJunk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 14, 2006
Location: Browns Summit NC
Posts: 2,507
Quote:
I can't think of any place within a hundred miles of here where a twenty-mile walk wouldn't bring me to a general store or 7-Eleven
LOL. If I get on top of the ridge that runs through my lease where it has been cut over I can see the top of the hospital.
ZeroJunk is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.14133 seconds with 9 queries