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Old September 2, 2012, 01:48 PM   #1
QuarterHorse
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My new SP101

I'll get photos up, but as a teaser, I'm in love. I wanted one for a while now and have been searching for deals, which proved to be tough for this particular gun. I had only found used guns for near new prices. I bit the bullet and picked up a new one.

100 rounds through it today at the range while I was re-testing my muzzleloader zero and I was grinning. This will be my new EDC gun without doubt.

Ate the magnum bullets zero issues, and the recoil was so much more manageable than some people on the internet make it out to be. Some slight trigger work, a big dot front sight, and I think that's all it'll take to make it perfect. I didn't think I'd like the grips, I was wrong. Love 'em. I may put a set of Badger "pretty" ones on it, but honestly don't know that I'll keep 'em on just due to how tacky the factory grips are.

Anyway, this is a short post, I'll get pics up tonight.

This guy is still grinnin'!!!!
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Old September 2, 2012, 01:56 PM   #2
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Quote:
Some slight trigger work,
can be accomplished with daily dry fire.

I miss my 101.
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Old September 2, 2012, 02:04 PM   #3
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Daily dry fire and trigger work are two completely different things. Your finger will develop some new strength but the trigger is not going to change to any really useful measurable degree, especially on a Ruger. Dry firing will certainly not do any harm but it isn't going to "improve" the trigger. I say this only because I have spent years doing trigger work for a living and I know what is required.
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Old September 2, 2012, 02:11 PM   #4
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Quote:
I say this only because I have spent years doing trigger work for a living
Splains a lot, right there.

What you are tellin me is that a new Ruger trigger will not "wear in"- the trigger pull will not smooth out with use, especially at first?

Okey, dokey.
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Old September 2, 2012, 07:04 PM   #5
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Yes, that's what I'm telling you. Trigger work and dry firing a gun are two different things. And if you've ever looked at any Ruger frame with a magnifier you would know that. They're filled with chips and burrs. Dry firing isn't going to fix that. But guess what? YOU WIN! I'm not going to try to argue with you on some forum. YOU WIN!

Last edited by drail; September 2, 2012 at 07:09 PM.
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Old September 2, 2012, 10:11 PM   #6
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There's no arguing in this thread.

I snuk a pic after a quick wipe down with one of his Ruger brothers. Momma don't know this is in the safe at this moment....... :X

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Old September 3, 2012, 06:09 AM   #7
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Momma don't know this is in the safe...
Good luck there....

Congrats on the new Ruger. They really are great guns.

As you mentioned, the triggers are gritty at first. While dry firing it might not equal a full on trigger job, from my experience it does seem to smooth it out a bit.
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Old September 3, 2012, 06:36 AM   #8
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I have an honest gunsmith who is overwhelmed with work. I asked about a trigger job for my new Blackhawk. He said don't worry about it. Just shoot the gin for a few months. You might not need a trigger job.

This advice came from a guy who is so busy he gave me two boxes of winchester 7.62x54r SP ammo for taking his truck to Auto Zone to get the battery replaced.
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Old September 3, 2012, 11:21 AM   #9
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Well I'm taking our 4 year old son out today, perhaps I can find some goodies at the store for it while we're out.

On the short list is a pocket holster for sure. lol
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Old September 3, 2012, 12:02 PM   #10
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4 may be a bit young yet, but by the time my oldest was eight, I was loading light .38 special target loads (4.6 gr 700X under a 125 gr plated bullet for about 800 f/sec) for the kids to shoot..... there were a couple of years there that I loaded more of that than anything else.....
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Old September 3, 2012, 12:10 PM   #11
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+ 1 on the dry fireing, it does smooth it out, or i should say it has on all 6 of mine.
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Old September 3, 2012, 12:16 PM   #12
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Quote:
And if you've ever looked at any Ruger frame with a magnifier you would know that. They're filled with chips and burrs.
Those chips and burrs won't be cleaned up/worn away with use? That won't make the trigger lighter, true, but it will get smoother, IME, and it seems like others', as well.
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Old September 3, 2012, 12:18 PM   #13
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Oh I wasn't taking him shooting. Just out and about while mommy has her time.
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Old September 3, 2012, 12:22 PM   #14
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She has hers, and you guys have yours. Use wisely, as it is a finite commodity: They are not making any more, and once it is gone, it is gone.
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Old September 3, 2012, 08:12 PM   #15
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Well the boy and I picked up a pocket holster for it. Wore it around today, I don't get the complaining people have about pocket carrying the SP. I wear cargo shorts and the thing disapears with a decent belt holding my pants up.

Still love this thing. Next up, Meprolight front sight and Wolff spring kit!
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Old September 4, 2012, 12:27 PM   #16
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To say that dry-firing won't smooth out a trigger is simply wrong. It will. Most people know this from personal experience. To say that dry-firing can replace a good trigger job is equally wrong.
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Old September 4, 2012, 12:46 PM   #17
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I don't get the complaining people have about pocket carrying the SP. I wear cargo shorts and the thing disapears with a decent belt holding my pants up.
The expose hammer might make for snagging .... and it is pretty heavy.

If it works for you, go for it!
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Old September 4, 2012, 05:41 PM   #18
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jimbob - The hammer will be coming off here shortly. My springs and meprolight front sight should be here soon. At that point when the gun is apart, I'll be doing some cutting/grinding/polishing on it.
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Old September 4, 2012, 06:45 PM   #19
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Quote:
The expose hammer might make for snagging...
The hammer spur can certainly snag, but I've never had it happen to me with my S&W 637. I'd live with the spur for a while before I made up my mind about taking it off or not.
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Old September 4, 2012, 08:40 PM   #20
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When I watched my reloading and all-round gun mentor take apart his newly-arrived 1858 Remington replica, I was impressed at how easy it was for him to take off all the many burrs and rough edges with a Dremel tool and to clean and polish the innards in fairly short time. My fear about dry-firing as a cure-all is analogous to the way we broke-in car engines in the 1950s-60s. We changed the oil and filter after 100 miles to get all the shavings out, so that there was no chance they could recirculate and scar other metal parts inside the engine.

While a gun's receiver is not a wet-sump engine, it seems to me that getting all burrs and shards out at the earliest possible time in the life of the gun is what is best for it. Maybe I am too old-fashioned and maybe guns are as maintenance-free as new cars seem to be. Even so, it can't hurt to tear 'em down and knock off the rough edges - worst case, I wasted some time having a good time. And guns are way more fun to tear down than carburetors because there's much less chance that you'll have pieces left over after they are reassembled.
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Old September 4, 2012, 08:49 PM   #21
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Good pistol, break it in then decide if you need to do anything. I had snagging problems in pocket carry so for that I went with a S&W 642.
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Old September 4, 2012, 09:23 PM   #22
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IIRC, Lady Tamara K. once wrote something to the effect that, "A Dremel tool and the innards of a firearm go together like handguns and hard liquor."
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Old September 4, 2012, 10:08 PM   #23
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Old September 4, 2012, 10:10 PM   #24
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"Guns are way more fun to tear down than carburetors.."...now there's some genuine truth to that. The worst gun is better than an easy carburetor. And you're right about getting the chips and burrs out as soon as possible for the same reason you do on an engine. (if you want it to run for a long time) But you don't use a Dremel to clean up a gun. Small hand stones and a very light touch. Then flush and blow out with compressed air and relube. Until you do this you cannot even really "feel" what the trigger pull is like because all of the moving parts are bumping and grinding over each other like a Little Feat song.

Last edited by drail; September 4, 2012 at 10:16 PM.
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Old September 4, 2012, 10:26 PM   #25
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What are you guys using for "hand stones"? I've done a lot of work with my hands with sanding, shaping, etc.... but I'm curious to see what you guys are using. I'm all about learning more and new stuff!!!!

Thanks all!
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