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Old September 4, 2012, 09:38 PM   #1
1911steelplate
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burris eliminator laser scope

I've been looking at the burris eliminator laser scope, does anyone have stories about them.good or bad
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Old September 4, 2012, 10:07 PM   #2
Brian Pfleuger
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Never used one but I did research them extensively.

The feeling I get is that it's essentially a Beta level product.

A great idea, in it's infancy, heavy, bulky, not quite up to its hype.

I'm hoping later generations and/or competitors products will improve on the idea.
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Old September 4, 2012, 11:17 PM   #3
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I "borrowed" one for about a month, 2 years ago. It was heavy, occasionally a little electronically "quirky"... fun to play with and fairly accurate, but for my needs at the time, it wasn't any distinct advantage over a good mildot scope and a good rangefinder... of which I had a few of already.

Every now and then, I see the original Eliminator deeply discounted... and there is a $100 mail in rebate available now. If you don't mind the earlier technology as compared to it's newer, fancier II and III brothers (in particular, the ability to use the ranging feature at any magnification), and the negatives that Brian mentioned in his post, you can probably pick one up pretty cheap.
There's the Bushnell "Yardage Pro" in the mix too... so maybe take a look at that.

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Old September 7, 2012, 11:26 PM   #4
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I have been watching this scope since the inception of its first generation and it has come a long way. I still don't own one, and don't know if I ever will, but the new 3rd generation model is the lightest yet and looks much more like a traditional scope than the previous two generations.

The newest version is only 8 oz. heavier than a traditional scope from mfg like Leupold and Nikon and includes windage adjustments along with many other new features.

The weight has never been an issue to me and I never doubted that the technology would work. For me the issue has been a knawing feeling that I'd be cheating as a hunter if I used it. The scope takes almost all the skill out of shooting at distance. You just put the dot on the sweet spot and that's exactly where the bullet's going to enter.
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Old September 8, 2012, 11:47 AM   #5
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Quote:
The weight has never been an issue to me and I never doubted that the technology would work. For me the issue has been a knawing feeling that I'd be cheating as a hunter if I used it. The scope takes almost all the skill out of shooting at distance. You just put the dot on the sweet spot and that's exactly where the bullet's going to enter.

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I agree with this. I see these guys with their special scopes adjusting the turrets for 10,000 yard shots and dropping animals in the next county. Is this "hunting". NO. It's shooting. Bench rest shooting at a live target.

And I have a hard time calling this "fair chase".
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Old September 9, 2012, 04:31 PM   #6
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It takes the hunt out for sure. It's neat but imho i put mil dot and balistic scopes right there also. If you have a crosshair for 1,2,3,4,5oo yards it doesn't seem right.
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Old September 9, 2012, 06:22 PM   #7
Brian Pfleuger
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You guys crack me up with this "it ain't hunting", fair chase, it ain't right nonsense.

It's perfectly ok to hunt with weapons made of materials and built to standards impossible just a few decades ago, use optics unimaginable just a few decades ago, powders, bullets and cartridges designed in the last few years but now a scope that adjusted for range isn't fair.

This is the same nonsense put out there by recurve/long bow hunters about compounds and compound hunters against crossbows. The same nonsense flintlock shooters give inline shooters.

Whatever technology coincides with your generation is ok, anything new is "not fair", anything old is outdated. Asinine.
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Old September 9, 2012, 09:48 PM   #8
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yep
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Old September 10, 2012, 08:40 AM   #9
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If you think long range shooting is turning a knob and pulling the trigger, you would be very wrong.
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Old September 10, 2012, 09:32 AM   #10
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It's using hardware to substitute for learned skills, is all.

You can spend the money on the hardware, or the time and money aquiring the skills.

In the end, I'd rather have the skills. They weigh nothing, take no batteries and nobody but you can take them away from you.

Anybody with a enough dollars can buy that hardware......
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Old September 10, 2012, 09:47 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Pfleuger
It's perfectly ok to hunt with weapons made of materials and built to standards impossible just a few decades ago, use optics unimaginable just a few decades ago, powders, bullets and cartridges designed in the last few years but now a scope that adjusted for range isn't fair.
You mean that I don't have to jump out of a tree onto them and kill them with a flint knife? </snark>

Yeah, sometimes those arguments get pretty old.
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Old September 10, 2012, 10:03 PM   #12
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I used to only hunt with a Leupold 1.5x5 power scope or a Redfield widefield scope always set at the lowest power for that deer or coyote that jumps out at arms length as the wide field of view helped on the close shots.

I always figured five power was enough for the long shots as I always limited myself to shots while hunting at 400 yards or less and I figured on the long shots I would generally have time to crank the scope up to the highest power.

Fast foward to today and I have too many scopes and rifles to keep track of and I do own the Burris eliminator scope. Optics seem bright and clear, adjustments seem precise, I have not shot the box with it, and I have not done accuracy testing with it but I have shot it out to 600 yards with my FAL.

Does it work, yes, I only bought it because I believe this is the wave of the future with scopes automatically ranging and showing holdover with a dot on the vertical crosshair of the reticle with the scope on target you press a button and it shows you the yardage in the top of the scope and a red dot shows up beneath the horizontal crosshair on the vertical crosshair for holdover. I also have three first focal plane riflescopes where most of my life I only used second focal plane. By the way you have to program it to your caliber and load. Someday they will probably figure out a way to determine windage also.

While I like the new technology, as I get older, I have more and more respect for the game animals I am hunting, and a single shot with an old scope or iron sights or a bow just makes the challenge more interesting as I have plenty to eat and don't care anymore whether I kill anything or not.

Combat is another story entirely, developing scope technology like this, I can remember when I would never take a battery powered red dot over iron sights, how things have changed, in the arena of life and death any edge over the other guy is appreciated.
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Last edited by PH/CIB; September 10, 2012 at 10:10 PM.
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Old September 10, 2012, 10:33 PM   #13
PH/CIB
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I forgot to mention about the Burris Eliminator Scope, the computer programming only goes so far, go into the Hornady website and do the ballistic calculator tables plug in your caliber and bullet weight and ballistic coefficient, sectional density etc...even if all these factors remain the same, then plug in different temperatures say from 20 degrees with low humidity at a certain altitude, then plug in the same factors but change the temperature to 90 degrees with high humidity and at a different altitude and see how much your bullet drop changes.

And this does not take into account any wind,,,so even though I like my Burris Eliminator Scope, the technology probably has a long way to go, but that is the case with any scope,the morning I would go to the range, I should watch the weather to get temperature and humidity and wind direction and speed and do the ballistic calculator that morning I go to the range to get the most accurate holdover possible and watch the wind flags at the range. I am just getting into long range rifle shooting, hunting at less than 400 yards was much easier.
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Last edited by PH/CIB; September 10, 2012 at 10:43 PM.
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