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Old August 24, 2012, 05:03 PM   #1
Jonzeey02
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.45 ACP

Hi forum i have two questions that i need help with. First question is i am confused because i didnt know a .45 acp shell took large and small primers so i was wondering what primers i need to use and does it matter?

Second question is i am gonna buy brass in bulk and was just wondering if i get the load amounts right does the brand of the brass matter. As a newbie should i buy in bulk and get all sorts of makes of brass or just stick to one brand for now?

As always i appreciate all the advise i get from you all.
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Old August 24, 2012, 05:23 PM   #2
ScottRiqui
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There's .45 ACP brass that uses small pistol primers, and other .45 ACP brass that uses large pistol primers. With the bulk once-fired brass I've collected, the overwhelming majority uses large primers, to the point where I just throw away the small-primer stuff.

Unless you're loading for ultimate accuracy, I don't think there's enough difference in case capacities between the different brands to worry about it.
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Old August 24, 2012, 05:27 PM   #3
Uncle Buck
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Buy large pistol primers for the large holed .45 ACP and small pistol primers for the small holed .45 ACP.

I have only come across one piece of .45 ACP brass with a small primer pocket. I tossed it in to the recycle bucket. My preference is to purchase brass with the large pistol primer.

I would not worry about what brand of used brass to purchase, but if I was to purchase new brass, I like Starline.

I usually end up loosing my brass amongst the grass before it goes bad (Splits, etc...)
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Old August 24, 2012, 05:47 PM   #4
marklyftogt
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I agree on Starline. I would also say to try and stick with just one headstamp.

It makes it much more consistent when loading. Some are just a little longer or shorter than others and that makes it tough to get a consistent crimp.

That being said, if you are just plinking it probably won't matter too much.
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Old August 24, 2012, 05:50 PM   #5
arch308
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In my expierence any brass works for the 45ACP. I generally just pick up my own with any others I find. If I buy any mixed used works just fine.
I'm finding more & more small primer brass at the range. I just seperate it after de-capping & sizing and when I have enough load it with small pistol primers and my normal loads. My guns can't tell the difference.
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Old August 24, 2012, 05:51 PM   #6
hodaka
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Yes, small primers in .45 ACP is fairly new on the scene. An invention whose sole purpose was to frustrate those that load large primer .45's on a progressive press. I see it more and more in the stuff I pick up and it has added a step to my reloading process. I throw it away although I'm sure it works fine. With a rifle the brand of brass matters a lot, not so much with a pistol.
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Old August 24, 2012, 05:56 PM   #7
dunerjeff
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I like the small primer cases. After experimenting with a particular load for a bullseye type competition, the small primer brass grouped better consistantly than the large primer.I don't know why. For general shooting though any of the brass works good and if I had the choice I would get Winchester only brass as oppossed to a mix of any/all.Or even only Fed or Speer. Just so all the walls are the same thickness, neck tension is more consistant ect....but honestly for the most part it isn't a big deal. I'm just fussy about stuff.
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Old August 24, 2012, 06:33 PM   #8
mikld
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I like to sort my brass by headstamp, but have no preferences to mfg. I once read an article where a feller loaded up 100 mixed brass and 100 all same headstamp. The difference in accuracy was nil...

Oh, but trash all Amerc (sp?) brass. Reported to crack/split on first reload, odd size primer pockets, and just very low quality.
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Old August 24, 2012, 06:38 PM   #9
Misssissippi Dave
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I have both large and small primer brass for .45. Most of the small primer brass is Federal Champion you get from Wal-Mart. I came across some also with Blazer Brass. I clean them all then separate the large and small. I use standard large and small primers depending on the case. I don't change the load when I switch from one to the other. I use either at the ranges. When switching from a different caliber I will load as many cases as I can using the same size primer the previous caliber was using. If I need more I will then switch to the other primer size and try to load as many rounds as I can before switching to another caliber.

It also works well if I can continue using the same powder.

I can't see any reason not to use either case unless you only have a handful of of the other size. The other solution is to have two presses and have one set for small primers and the other for large primers.
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Old August 24, 2012, 06:58 PM   #10
chris in va
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Crimp...on a 45acp?

But anyway don't overthink this. Get your mixed brass and have at it. It's a very easy and forgiving round to load for.
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Old August 24, 2012, 07:11 PM   #11
ScottRiqui
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I crimp mine, but it's a gentle taper crimp, leaving the case mouth diameter around 0.470" or so.
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Old August 24, 2012, 09:55 PM   #12
Mike38
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Quote:
Crimp...on a 45acp?
Yes, you can't leave it flared! Crimp it just enough to get rid of the flare. You have to for reliable feeding into the chamber.
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Old August 24, 2012, 10:16 PM   #13
Nathan
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45ACP is traditionally large primer. Federal has started making small primer for it. Both work, but large primer is more common.

I would go to the indoor range and while sweeping up my hundred, try to sweep up 400 more lefft on the ground by others.

or, go to the outdoor public range and just ask people if you can pick there brass up. A couple of good hours will get you 500 brass.
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Old August 24, 2012, 11:06 PM   #14
medalguy
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I'm finding more and more small primer .45 at the range. I attribute this to the fact that no one seems to want to reload it, and they just leave it on the ground. I pick it all up, and have around 600 rounds now. I load it just like the large primer brass but keep it separated.

I crimp just enough to remove any remaining flare, but a taper crimp should be all you need.
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Old August 25, 2012, 12:44 AM   #15
ROGER4314
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I buy the Starline brass and use large pistol primers. In fact, I toss out all small pistol primer 45acp cases. I load .45acp on a Dillon progressive and it's not worth the effort to accommodate both primer sizes.

The "crimp" that I use on all semi auto pistol cases is what I call "zero bell". I simply adjust the die so all bell is removed. Those cases headspace on the forward end of the case so I want that surface available to touch the chamber forward end.

Flash
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Old August 25, 2012, 02:48 PM   #16
Jonzeey02
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Thanks guys for the info.
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Old August 26, 2012, 10:43 AM   #17
Gerry
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I'm actively buying up other folk's small primer .45 that they'd otherwise throw away and selling the large primer version I pick up at the range. It saves me a bit of time on the Dillon 650 when switching back and forth between 9mm and .45 ACP. Plus I only have one kind of pistol primer to buy and can buy in bigger bulk, saving me even more cash.
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Old August 28, 2012, 12:40 PM   #18
mikld
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Using the term "crimp" when talking about semi-auto ammo can/is misleading to new reloaders (and some old guys too!). No actual crimping is needed. Mebbe we should say "De-flaring" or "Mouth Straightening" rather than crimp. I "de-flare" all the case mouths when reloading 45 ACP with a taper crimping die, I do not crimp...
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Old August 28, 2012, 02:29 PM   #19
tkglazie
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I crimp mine, but it's a gentle taper crimp, leaving the case mouth diameter around 0.470" or so.

same here, I taper crimp (FCD) to .469"-.470" to aid feeding.
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Old August 28, 2012, 06:51 PM   #20
Misssissippi Dave
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I forgot to mention the loads with small pistol primers will have the speed reduced around 20 to 30 fps more or less. Sometimes this helps with accuracy. If you are loading for competition and need to meet a certain power factor you may need to add .1 grains of powder to your pet load to be sure you do meet the power factor they require. The average person punching paper or shooting steel at the range probably will never notice the difference between large and small pistol primer loads if everything else is the same.
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