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Old August 22, 2012, 03:33 PM   #1
Jonzeey02
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Primers

Im just getting into this reloading stuff and it makes sense but i kinda confused about how to handle the primers? I guess what i am asking is of course i dont want them to go off so i was wondering if they can touch each other and can my leftovers stay in the handheld primer tool until i reload the next time? I just dont want one blowing up in my face thanks.
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Old August 22, 2012, 03:40 PM   #2
okiefarmer
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They ain't gonna esplode just touching each other. They are rubbing all sides of each other while in the hand primers, and stacked on top of each other when in a press tube, if you are familiar with one. I would put thm back in the boxes they came out of after priming a batch just to keep them segregated in case you have different kinds of primers. Some are a bit hotter than others they say.

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Old August 22, 2012, 03:41 PM   #3
serf 'rett
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It is highly recommended that primers are kept in their original package for storage. Would be best to put the unused primers back into the package instead of storing in priming tool.

In most handheld priming tools, the primers touch each other, with no problems. Just store the unused ones when you are finished priming and I do mean when you are finished priming, not finished loading. This will help you to avoid knocking the priming tool off the bench with primers in it. You are trying to avoid impact to the primers.
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Old August 22, 2012, 04:09 PM   #4
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It takes a good strike to set one off. That said, it makes sense to handle and store them with care. I have never had one go off in several years of reloading, but I always wear safety glasses just in case.
I'm told, that it would be like a firecracker going off, not a life threatening event if only one, but sure would get your attention.
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Old August 22, 2012, 04:13 PM   #5
Jonzeey02
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Thanks guys for the info. That was my only concern.
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Old August 22, 2012, 04:18 PM   #6
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I generally keep them in the original packages. But sometimes up to a half a tray will get left in the covered plastic flipper tray on the reloading table, or in the primer feed tube on the press (with a blast shield around it)

The 2 main things to remember are:
  1. keep penetrating oil FAR away from them (not dangerous but it will ruin them), and
  2. do not pour them all into a glass fruit jar to save space.
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Old August 22, 2012, 04:28 PM   #7
Jonzeey02
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Im assuming if im reloading. 308 win im using large rifle primers?
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Old August 22, 2012, 04:34 PM   #8
marklyftogt
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I use a Lee ergo primer and load only pistol. I leave 20-30 in there at times.
Never an issue. I load some every few days. Of course, I don't toss it around either. I always were glasses when priming or reloading.
Welcome to the addiction!
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Old August 22, 2012, 04:35 PM   #9
serf 'rett
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Quote:
It takes a good strike to set one off
I crushed one into a primer pocket sideways without it exploding. Figured it was scrap, eased it out with a decapping die, took it out to the shop, donned PPE, whacked it with hammer (not recommended) and found it took sizable amount of force to detonate.

As stated - I DO NOT recommend doing the above! Just saying avoid impact.
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Old August 22, 2012, 04:36 PM   #10
marklyftogt
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Quote:
Im assuming if im reloading. 308 win im using large rifle primers?
Your loading manual should tell you what to use. If it doesn't, get another one.
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Old August 22, 2012, 04:39 PM   #11
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Yeah, .308Win uses large rifle primers.
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Old August 22, 2012, 04:44 PM   #12
Jonzeey02
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I havnt bought a reloading manual yet but i heard lyman is the best do you giys agree? Thanks.
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Old August 22, 2012, 04:46 PM   #13
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the biggest problem I have had with primers is when I spilled some on the floor. They popped a bit when they went through my wife's vacuum cleaner. (did not have a regular reloading area at the time)

I all ways store in original package.
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Old August 22, 2012, 09:42 PM   #14
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I only have two types of primers CCI small pistol and CCI large rifle, so for now, I dont worry about leaving them out, since they would be pretty tough to confuse.... However, since I do plan to load .223 and 45Colt eventually, I have written "small pistol" and "large rifle" on my hand primer trays, and when I get my first cartridges that use small rifle and large pistol, I will add additional primer trays and write "small rifle" and "large pistol" on them, so I cant be confused.....

That said, I almost always run out of primers before I run out of brass to prime..... And if I run out of primers with less than 100 cases left, I will just wait till I size some more before breaking out the next box of primers unless I need them to load right now, which doesnt happen often.....
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Old August 23, 2012, 02:47 AM   #15
Sport45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonzeey02
can my leftovers stay in the handheld primer tool until i reload the next time?
They can, but why should they? It's very easy to dispense only the amount you need from the original packaging to the priming tool. They drop out in rows of ten and you can block what you want with a thumb or finger from the last row.
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Old August 23, 2012, 04:57 AM   #16
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I have four manuals, as well as some print outs from the powder companies.

I like to check several references before I reload a new bullet.

Also, I put powder and primers back in the original packages when I get finished or have to quit for more than a few hours.

Powder left in the powder measure can cause the powder measure plastic hopper to change color. I do not know if light affects the powder, but it is usually in a dark container when you buy it.

Welcome to the wonderful world of reloading.
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Old August 23, 2012, 06:43 AM   #17
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I normally prime by the tens. If I don't load all of them, I store the primed cases in a finished rounds box with case mouth turned down to make sure nothing gets inside. Then normally within a day or two, depending on life, I load the rest of the ones I've already primed.
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Old August 23, 2012, 10:48 AM   #18
Jonzeey02
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Thanks for all the info guys you guys helped out tremendously.
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Old August 23, 2012, 10:57 AM   #19
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This is overkill, but for long-term storage I'll put a fresh small box of primers (in other words, not the Federals I use for a lot of loading) into one of those foodsaver shrink bags and seal it. That sucks the air out and will keep the box fresh even if there's a water leak. No need to worry about Florida humidity, etc. Someday I'll get more gung-ho and find the right size dessicant packs to throw in there with them. The only downside to this is it makes 'em more difficult to stack, but you can still cram the boxes into ammo cans.

Those foodsavers are great for keeping almost anything dry, including your spare currency.

Last edited by FloridaVeteran; August 23, 2012 at 11:42 AM. Reason: meant water leak, not air
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