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Old July 25, 2012, 12:49 PM   #1
marklyftogt
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Old gummed up 1911A1

I came across and old 1911 that is so gummed up that the slide won't move.
I got the trigger, hammer and mag release to move by putting on some Hoppes but no luck on the slide.

How would you recommend that I can loosen it up?

Solvent bath and if so what solvent?

Sonic bath?

I don't want to hurt it.
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Old July 25, 2012, 01:03 PM   #2
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If the grips are wood, rubber (or anything worth keeping for that matter) remove them. Spray it down with a product that will penetrate the "gum". Anything from Ballistol to PB Blaster will work... just something that will soften/dissolve the varnish/powder/grease/gorp that causing the bind. Hell... even good old WD-40 will work in this context.

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C
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Old July 25, 2012, 01:09 PM   #3
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Creeper has the right idea but I'd go a slightly different route. Remove the grip panels and magazine and submerge it into a bucket of kerosine (diesel fuel will work in a pinch). Let it sit there for a week or so.
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Old July 25, 2012, 01:17 PM   #4
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I was thinkin' about that Doyle... maybe even acetone , but I was a little worried about flammability. Diesel does seem like a good candidate as well... a bit safer. I was leaning toward the PB blaster because if there's any rust, it's pretty good at loosening that up.

Try something... until it works.

C
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Old July 25, 2012, 02:05 PM   #5
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I like your idea of soaking. I think I would probably use an acetone/transmission fluid mix.
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Old July 25, 2012, 02:29 PM   #6
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So I am thinking I will get a clean paint can and fill it with kerosene and give it a bath for a week......we shall see!
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Old July 25, 2012, 03:23 PM   #7
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Another trick is to put the gun in boiling water. It will break down the gunk and help free up the slide.

DJ
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Old July 25, 2012, 03:26 PM   #8
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I'm not an acetone fan except for very limited use wiping things off. It's pretty harsh (mainly on the user). Kerosine is an amazing solvent. As an added benefit, it doesn't dry out the pores of the metal like acetone does. If you use something like acetone or brake cleaner, you have to immediately follow up with a coating of petroleum based lubricant to get into the pores of the metal. Failure to do so can result in flash rust.
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Old July 25, 2012, 03:50 PM   #9
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Kerosene or diesel fuel is what I would recommend. Acetone is not necessary in this application and will evaporate off so fast you would end up using an awful lot and it's not cheap. My guess is someone soaked it in WD 40 and put it away. In time WD 40 turns into something like Loctite.
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Old July 26, 2012, 11:51 AM   #10
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For stuck parts, try a soaking in mineral spirits, (paint thinner), followed by another soaking in transmission fluid.
The combination of first soaking in a solvent, followed by another soaking in a good lubricant seems to work.
A little judicious use of force might still be needed, though.
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Old July 26, 2012, 11:57 AM   #11
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Kroil

I would squirt some Kroil in and around it. Let it soak a day or two, then start tapping all over with a plastic hammer face.
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Old July 26, 2012, 12:36 PM   #12
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I'll assume the slide will not move from the closed position.

I would consider it loaded till you prove otherwise.

You might try using a pencil,inserted from the muzzle till it stops,then see if the length it went in is the same as from muzzle to breech face.If there is a round in the chamber it will stop short.

Then,a soak is good.Grips off.Solvent,ATF,etc all good.

Be sure the thumb safety is in the fire position.

If rust is an issue,KW Knockerloose is a NAPA product that works well.

Most 1911's have some slide to frame clearance.A light tapping with a plastic or rawhide mallet (clean faces,no chips embedded) sideways,up and down the sides of the slide should help break a bond.Now,I'm talking tap it like it can feel pain,about like you might whack your own knee cap.

I suggest not whacking on the barrel bushing,slide stop,etc

Last edited by HiBC; July 26, 2012 at 12:47 PM.
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Old July 26, 2012, 12:59 PM   #13
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I'm another supporter of kerosene or #2 diesel. I'll tend towards diesel in the summer, kerosene in the winter, because I let this sort of stuff sit in the unheated part of my shop.

Acetone strips oils. It sure does a nice job removing oily gunk, but when you're done and you go to move the slide, you'll have metal-on-metal contact very quickly, with no lube, if the acetone has done it's job well.

Kroil is another very good penetrating lube.
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Old July 26, 2012, 02:24 PM   #14
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Quote:
My guess is someone soaked it in WD 40 and put it away. In time WD 40 turns into something like Loctite.
No it doesn't. My dad didn't use anything but WD-40 on his guns for many years. I don't think he fired a shot in his last 20. After He died I got his guns. They weren't gummed up or gummy. They functioned fine but were a little on the dry side.
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Old July 26, 2012, 02:28 PM   #15
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Quote:
I don't think he fired a shot in his last 20.
That's what kept them from getting gummy. WD 40 attracts residue and converts it to a nice mess that you then have to clean off.
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Old July 26, 2012, 02:38 PM   #16
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Try "Gunzilla" from topduck.com. It's not a solvent, not toxic and cleans everything I've thrown at it. Especially good on old,old powder/carbon deposits. I cleaned up an old Mauser M48 with great success. Out!
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Old July 26, 2012, 02:43 PM   #17
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Kerosene.
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Old July 26, 2012, 03:22 PM   #18
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I have a problem handling solvents .I boil the gun in a solution of trisodium phosphate. Works great BUT make sure the gun doesn't contain anything other than steel !!
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Old July 26, 2012, 03:46 PM   #19
Hawg Haggen
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Quote:
That's what kept them from getting gummy. WD 40 attracts residue and converts it to a nice mess that you then have to clean off.
WD-40 dries, that's why it's not good as a lube. It doesn't attract anything and it doesn't build up.
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Old July 28, 2012, 06:21 PM   #20
marklyftogt
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Ding! Ding! Ding!

DJ 28 you are the winner.
I soaked it in Kerosene for 3 days. No change even with some light tapping.
I know three days isn't much so I was going to put it back in it's bath.

I was reading through this thread and saw the idea of boiling it. That made sense. It could liquify the old grease/oil.

So i put it in a pan of boiling water for about 5 minutes.

Took it out with a tongs and let it cool on a cloth.
Tapped it a few times and then.....

.....tried to move the slide and she went!

I would guess the kero and tapping helped loosen things up but the boiling water did the trick.

I have a shooter!!!

Thanks guys.
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Old July 29, 2012, 12:01 PM   #21
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Don't cook your dinner in that pan.
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Old July 31, 2012, 02:13 PM   #22
Topos
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Simple Penetrating Fluid

On one of the machinist hobby sites they listed the
rates of penetration and foot pound releases:


Their most effective was transmission fluid and ammonia.
I can attest to its effectiveness.

I use this combo over my go-to-since 1967 Kroil:

A mixture of 7 parts of automatic transmission fluid
and 3 parts of ammonia. Note: since transmission
fluid is hydroscopic you must re-oil when parts are separated.

As for rust removal, again I have tested and used frequently, a bath
of white vinegar for total immersion. In a few hours or over
night you will see the rust gone. Then I neutralize with baking soda
and water. Do not leave in longer than necessary else the slime
re-coats.

Minimizes amount of clean metal that must be polished away.
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Old July 31, 2012, 04:29 PM   #23
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...and how does bluing stand up to those chemical?
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Old July 31, 2012, 05:12 PM   #24
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Boiled Browning. This has Julia Child potential.

Glad the 1911 is unstuck.
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Old July 31, 2012, 10:53 PM   #25
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Topos, that is completely wrong. The mix is 50/50 acetone and tranny fluid. I think you meant hygroscopic as well, but tranny fluid doesn't draw moisture. Vineager WILL remove bluing. I'd bet the ammonia will discolor it or harm it as well, not sure about it.
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