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Old July 28, 2012, 10:44 AM   #1
hornetguy
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cross-draw carry

I've heard lots of folks denigrate the crossdraw carry.. thought I'd see what the thoughts were from foks here.
It seems like if one was carrying concealed, say, under a light jacket, that the crossdraw motion would be more subtle, less noticeable than sweeping the jacket back for a strongside carry.
I will admit to never having compared the two types of draws, side by side, but it just seems like it would be much easier to slip your hand under the front of your jacket without a lot of shoulder movement.

What am I missing?
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Old July 28, 2012, 02:07 PM   #2
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I've tried them all. Cross draw can be a hit or miss. Dependent on the gun, the quality of the belt... most importantly your build and the actual angle of the holster will determine if it's going to work for your needs.

Horse soldiers and cowboys didn't have many issues with cross draw because on a horse, your legs are not perpendicular to your torso.
If you sit a lot, at work, in a car... extreme cant holsters in your back or in your belly can be really uncomfortable.

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Old July 28, 2012, 04:16 PM   #3
Old Grump
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As part of the permanent Shore Patrol in Los Angeles I carried cross draw because we were in and out of the truck all day and it sat better on my offhand side. Today, 40 years later, when I am woods walking I carry my 7 1/2" Ruger Super Blackhawk the same way because on the right side it always seems to get in the way and I am used to drawing from the weak side with either hand.
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Old July 28, 2012, 11:10 PM   #4
ms6852
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I have considered cross draw carry but find it difficult to conceal a full length 1911 or 357 mag in this manner. Would work great in winter where I can wear coats or jacket but in San Antonio the winters are verrrrrry short and mild.
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Old July 29, 2012, 07:48 AM   #5
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Seems well suited for car carry.
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Old July 29, 2012, 08:32 AM   #6
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It's also well suited for horseback or 4-wheeler carry. Granted, concealment isn't an issue in those circumstances, but comfort is. In the pic below, I'm the fat fellow in the brown jacket. I'm carrying a 7.5 inch Ruger Super Blackhawk under that jacket in a crossdraw rig. Very comfortable for woods cruising.



Crossdraw has it's applications and is just another tool in the bag.
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Old July 29, 2012, 09:26 AM   #7
Edward429451
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I have a Galco crossdraw holster for my 5" 1911. I do normally carry IWB strong side, but CD does work for me very well in a car as already stated.

You just need to try one and see if it works for you.
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Old July 29, 2012, 11:17 AM   #8
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Like PawPaw, I also use a crossdraw position when I'm in the woods. If I carry on my right hip, the butt of my rifle keeps bumping against my handgun. By carrying it on the left side crossdraw, it stays out of the way.
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Old July 29, 2012, 04:07 PM   #9
Straightshooter629
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For me, cross-draw presents a more fluid, natural drawing motion. It also creates easier access when sitting, both in a car and otherwise. Also, when carrying a revolver as I do, crossdraw allows me to carry reloads on my strong-side( I'm right-handed) and in the correct position for reloading. While holding my revolver in my left hand I access my reloads from my right-side. Again, for me, crossdraw works the best.
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Old July 30, 2012, 09:31 AM   #10
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I'm with StraightShooter ... while I pocket carry most of the year because I'm normally in shorts and a t-shirt, when what passes for winter around here arrives and I can wear a fleece pullover, my PM9 goes into a paddle holster and I carry it cross-draw. It doesn't take long to regain my draw speed and I find it the most natural way to access my firearm quickly. I do carry strongside, usually a j-frame, but as I get older -- 67 now -- my shoulder becomes less and less enthused about the motion needed for strong-side draw, unless it's appendix carry ... If I lived where the weather allowed more clothing more of the year, I'd carry cross-draw all the time.
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Old July 30, 2012, 10:19 AM   #11
Bartholomew Roberts
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For those of you using cross-draw, how do you draw without sweeping the muzzle across everyone to your weak side? I suppose if you don't have to share the range with anyone, it isn't a consideration in training; but if you have to draw the pistol in a more crowded environment, how are you dealing with that?
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Old July 30, 2012, 12:25 PM   #12
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Quote:
For those of you using cross-draw, how do you draw without sweeping the muzzle across everyone to your weak side? I suppose if you don't have to share the range with anyone, it isn't a consideration in training; but if you have to draw the pistol in a more crowded environment, how are you dealing with that?
Keep the muzzle pointed downwards until the gun is line with the target.

Upon drawing the gun, bring it up to your chest with the muzzle facing downwards. Now rotate it so that the top of the slide is facing the target. Bring the muzzle up on target as you grip the gun with the support hand and then push outwards and engage.
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Old July 30, 2012, 12:30 PM   #13
Bartholomew Roberts
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Quote:
Upon drawing the gun, bring it up to your chest with the muzzle facing downwards. Now rotate it so that the top of the slide is facing the target. Bring the muzzle up on target as you grip the gun with the support hand and then push outwards and engage.
Maybe I am just having a hard time picturing it in my mind; but that description seems like it would cause you to sweep parts of your own body with the muzzle?
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Old July 30, 2012, 12:47 PM   #14
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Actually, if you are using a Weaver rather than an Isosceles stance... the gun is already aimed (albeit diagonally) down range.

Cheers,
C
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Old July 30, 2012, 01:43 PM   #15
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Others have made most of these points, but I'll borrow, add, and summarize a bit.

Crossdraw for cavalry made good sense because one's balance and center of gravity are disrupted less in a cross-draw motion than they are in a reach down to the strong side belt or thigh motion. This matters if the horse is moving at any sort of pace. This REALLY matters if the horse has been trained to respond to leg and body-shift commands.

Crossdraw for non-cavalrymen has some other advantages. As others have noted:

1) It's often easier to draw when seated (such as in a car or at a desk).
2) It avoids one's rifle butt from banging into the weapon, if hunting with rifle and handgun.
3) With long barreled hunting revolvers, it's easier to sit down on a log, stump, etc without jamming the holster into the log or the butt into your ribs.
4) (Back to the cavalry advantage) the drawing motion is potentially less obvious, as the arm doesn't have to move quite so radically as it typically does for a strong-side draw.
4a) My dad brought this to my attention - he has some shoulder joint issues and can't draw from an FBI canted IWB. He can draw just fine from a crossdraw rig.

Disadvantages (and possible fixes):
1) Can be harder to conceal larger guns. (I can't keep a 1911 or similar butt from printing under normal shirts, crossdraw, so I don't normally carry that way.)
2) Can pose a challenge for drawing at the range, without pointing the muzzle where you don't want it to point. (Fix: as others noted, foot and body positioning. Step back into Weaver or Chapman while drawing, and the muzzle gets shifted toward downrange.)
3) Can offer an assailant a grab opportunity. (Fix: Similar to range issue - step back into Weaver, Chapman, or retention, and grip no longer faces assailant.)
4) Easier to muzzle self while drawing. (Fix: practice with snap caps or a blue gun, and train to not muzzle self.)
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Old July 30, 2012, 04:25 PM   #16
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I carry cross-draw on long road trips, hiking and hunting.

Otherwise, it's conventional carry for me.
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Old July 30, 2012, 05:22 PM   #17
waepnedman
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If you are horseback, you guide the horse with your left hand. If you are leading a packhorse the lead rope is in your right hand. A sidearm on the right hip interferes with the lead rope. Cross draw is best if you are horseback. It also positions your ammo slide on the right for easy reloads. I use an El Paso Saddlery full flap and a six round slide for ammo.
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Old July 30, 2012, 06:00 PM   #18
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I have always liked strong side carry for the "ok here take my wallet" factor. No one ever reaches cross draw for their wallet.
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Old July 30, 2012, 06:42 PM   #19
Whirlwind06
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Cross draw no sweep- If standing, how about weak side towards bad guy. Draw and hold close to body?
Would not sweep the room then.
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Old July 30, 2012, 06:59 PM   #20
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El Paso Rigs

I tried an El Paso Saddlery 1920 Crossdraw (snap) with my Ruger Bisley. As Paw-Paw aptly put, they are very convenient out of trucks and ATV. For me, they are also perfect in a stand. BTW, all 5 of my Rugers wear this holster.
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Old July 30, 2012, 07:08 PM   #21
Mayor Al
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My "Andy Devine" figure makes belt-holsters a bit difficult to use, even with strong suspenders. I have used a left-side shoulder holster for a 45acp and also for a snub 357 magnum At various times. In my field vest- used on hunts- I have a cross-draw velcroed to the left front of the vest, where a cross draw belt holster would be. I like the location, but find limited use of the vest in my "real-life" environment.
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Old July 30, 2012, 07:10 PM   #22
meanmachine1961
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For some reason, I can't really explain it, I have always carried semi auto on my strong side but I carry revolvers cross draw. Been doing it this way for 30 years.
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Old July 30, 2012, 07:19 PM   #23
Straightshooter629
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Quote:
Maybe I am just having a hard time picturing it in my mind; but that description seems like it would cause you to sweep parts of your own body with the muzzle?
By keeping the muzzle pointed down and keeping the finger off of the trigger until you are on target (2 basic rules ), then sweeping reallyy dosen't become an issue. I don't see how you can sweep your own body when you maintain proper control of the muzzle. I practice my draw often and have never noticed that I am sweeping myself.
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Old July 30, 2012, 10:56 PM   #24
BfloBill
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+1 Water-Man

If my day includes a long car trip I carry cross-draw. It's just more comfortable in the car. But I have noticed it prints a bit more, so I usually like to wear an extra layer or light jacket (weather permitting).
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Old July 31, 2012, 10:13 AM   #25
Hook686
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Quote:
For those of you using cross-draw, how do you draw without sweeping the muzzle across everyone to your weak side? I suppose if you don't have to share the range with anyone, it isn't a consideration in training; but if you have to draw the pistol in a more crowded environment, how are you dealing with that?
If it is a life, or death situation does it really matter ?

At the range, the ranges I attended anyway, a holster is not permitted, so that is not an issue.

If I am home practicing a draw, the gun is unloaded and there is no one around to sweep. Why would anyone practice drawing with a loaded gun and other people around ?
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