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Old July 27, 2012, 04:46 AM   #1
steidle2131
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870 express rust problem

I have an 870 express which has served me well, only problem is if I don't put it away dripping (literally) with oil the next time I pull it out it will have surface rust on it. I left it in my truck for 3 days in high humidity and when I retrieved it the reciever was brown. Its real humid here but does anyone know of something I can put on it to prevent this.
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Old July 27, 2012, 06:15 AM   #2
plouffedaddy
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If it's as bad as you say (I have no reason to believe it isn't) I'd sand it down and refinish it. My choice would be Brownells Alumahyde II since it's very durable and easy to use. I've refinished a few guns with it and never had any rusting and I'm in the very humid southeast.

Here's an AK I did with it:
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Old July 27, 2012, 06:58 AM   #3
steidle2131
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That looks good, I'm gonna look into that. Thank for the reply.
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Old July 27, 2012, 07:21 AM   #4
mete
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Condensation is a big enemy ! If you 'put it away' in a closed case you're asking for trouble . One day I told my friend to open his case .When he did the entire shotgun was covered with condensate .I knew where he kept the gun and what the weather conditions were ,so it was prime conditions for condensation. Made him a believer .
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Old July 27, 2012, 12:40 PM   #5
BigJimP
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Storing it in your truck is the problem....

and like others said ...condensation is the enemy ....
-------------
Any time the air is humid ...when its warm, it'll hold moisture. As the air cools off...it wants to get rid of the moisture...and it will condense on the coldest thing around ( windshield, cast iron, steel...)....

I'd store the gun in your house ...or you're fighting a losing battle. Even in your house it'll be an issue ...unless you can keep the temp from dropping in the area where you store your guns ( like keep a small wattage light bulb on in the safe, or a golden rod, or something). Make sure the gun is as dry as possible when you store it ...and spray it with a light coat of oil ( like Rig #2 oil or something ) ...but you'll still have to check it often.

changing coatings might make a small difference....but you can't change the way the air loses its moisture as it cools down at night.
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Old July 27, 2012, 07:32 PM   #6
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Yep. Humidity and condensation are the culprits. My 870 is kept near a second floor window, but we rarely have much humidity. The temperature defenitely drop at night. A couple of weeks past, though, we had a few really humid days. Just checking the 870, which had been resing on its side, I found rust in two areas' the top of the top and sides of the bead's pedestal and a spot on the inside of the barrel near the muzzle. I think condensation forming on the inner walls of the barrel pooled at the lowest part of that inner wall. I think I will try a gun sock.
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Old July 27, 2012, 11:01 PM   #7
Method
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I feel better knowing I'm not the only one to have this problem with an 870. I had a small spot of rust developing after a few months of winter storage. The thing was, it was stored in a closet area with almost no humidity. I did however, have the case fully closed all winter, so it's possible there was some condensation.
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Old July 28, 2012, 02:13 AM   #8
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Consider a case's construction. Materials that breath, such as canvas with cotton banting, or plastic and foam?
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Old July 29, 2012, 04:34 PM   #9
cajun47
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ballistol soaks in. never had a problem keeping my mossberg in the truck. i do wipe it down at least once a month. i live in humidity.
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Old July 29, 2012, 05:43 PM   #10
publius
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The Express' finish is garbage. It is doubtful that you have gotten off all the rust since it rusted the first time so it pops back up quickly. I would get it professionally parkerized. Cheaper alternative would be Duracoat or similar but you must make sure there are no traced of rust before you paint.
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Old July 30, 2012, 09:01 AM   #11
steidle2131
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Thanks all for the input. I ordered the alumahyde II should have it Friday. Until I get time to apply it Ill just bring it inside at night
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Old July 30, 2012, 09:31 AM   #12
plouffedaddy
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It should help. Just a few pointers I've learned from using alumahyde. Put the (metal) parts in the oven at about 150-200 degrees for an hour or two before you de-grease them with whatever solvent you're thinking about using. There's always a little bit of oil somewhere on the gun that will leach out from baking that you'd otherwise be unable to get at (had to do a rifle twice to learn this lesson!).

Use gloves when handeling before and while applying the finish. The oil from your fingerprints will cause the alumahyde not to cure properly to the finish.

Lastly--once you've applied the final coat; don't touch the parts for a week at least. It really helps the finish harden and you'll be thankful you did after because the stuff it very durable once it's cured.
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Old July 30, 2012, 10:38 AM   #13
Pahoo
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Again, we are talking "new" Expresses !!!

Quote:
The Express' finish is garbage. It is doubtful that you have gotten off all the rust since it rusted the first time so it pops back up quickly.
Amen to that and I always encourage folks to find out for themselves and make the final measure. ...

EXAMPLE;
Take a brand new express, out of the box and wipe the barrel and reciever with an oily rag. Look at your rag and see what you have, especially off the barrel. You can repeat this process over and over, with the same results. I contacted the factory and they said it was a protective oil coating. The color was a dark rusty brown. ....
The problem is the courseness in the finish that allows for rust to form, in the deep grooves. ...

Be Safe !!!
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Old July 30, 2012, 11:50 AM   #14
drail
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Yes but the textured finish is less costly to manufacture and actually holds more oil on the metal, like Parkerizing but not as good. With this type of finish you have to keep a good coat of oil on it all of the time. If I was going to leave my 870 out in the elements (I wouldn't) I would ship it off to a shop that does Mil spec Parkerizing. It has worked on thousands of military guns for a very long time. Brush a heavy coat of oil or grease on Parkerizing and set it in the sun for a few hours and wipe it off. Painted finishes can be made to look very good but are not as durable as Park. I have bought new 870s and out of the box they are coated with some nasty preservative that does look just like rust, but it's not. I have used nothing but CLP on my 20 year old 870 and it hasn't rusted yet.
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