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Old July 24, 2012, 05:27 AM   #1
bigbuck007
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Has this some real collector value?

Perkussions-Revolver High Standard American Bicentennial Kal. 36

May i have some hints about the production year, quality, producer how many manufactered ets. and its value today

Thanks

Bigbuck
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Old July 24, 2012, 07:43 AM   #2
Willie Sutton
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Best to simply look on Gunbroker to see what they are selling for.

They are neither particularly rare, or particularly valuable. Seems to me that they ought to be selling in the US$400 range, perhaps a bit less.

They are an Italian made replica marked for sale in the US. This was part of a fairly unsuccessful effort by High Standard to diversify their product line at a time when their market share for the high quality .22 automatic pistols that they were famous for was declining. In 1976 you could sell almost anything marked "Bicentennial" in the USA and actually get people to buy it. Personally, I can't imagine buying an Italian copy of a Civil War revolver from a company that specialized in .22 target pistols to commemorate the 200th anniversary of a war that took place 100 years before the Civil War, but that's just me. You can draw from that the fact that there is limited interest in these.


Others here probably can say more.


Best,


Willie


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Old July 24, 2012, 08:00 AM   #3
Hawg
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It might bring that. There's one NIB on gunbroker at 100.00 with two days left. It was put together from Italian parts by High Standard and the frame is nickled brass. It's a Griswold and Gunnison clone from their Confederate collection. Madcrate or Fingers may have a better idea of value.
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Old July 24, 2012, 10:57 AM   #4
Fingers McGee
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Yes, they do have some collector value and are under appreciated

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbuck07
May i have some hints about the production year, quality, producer how many manufactered etc. and its value today
The High Standard Confederate Collection was produced in the mid 70s. High standard made the frames, Uberti made the rest of the parts. All assembly and finishing was done by High Standard. The model in your picture has a steel frame.

This link should answer most of your questions
http://www.histandard.info/models/re...ackpowder.html

2011 Blue Book values are:
100% - $450
98% - $275
90% - $225
80% - 175

As stated by others, the High standards appear frequently on the various auction sites and prices vary widely.
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Old July 24, 2012, 11:23 AM   #5
Hawg
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Quote:
The model in your picture has a steel frame.
I defer to your superior knowledge on these. I thought the Confederate collection were all brass frames.
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Old July 24, 2012, 11:43 AM   #6
Fingers McGee
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The Griswold & Gunnisons, Schneider and Glassicks, and some (around 25???) of the engraved Bicentennials had brass frames. The L&Rs and the rest of the Bicentennials were steel framed.

Check the link for more info.
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Cynic: A blackguard whose faulty vision see things as they are, not as they should be. Ambrose Bierce

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Old July 24, 2012, 02:05 PM   #7
Willie Sutton
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"High standard made the frames, Uberti made the rest of the parts."


I've read this same quote on the HS forums, but as a fairly dedicated High Standard collector as well as a BP shooter I have my own doubts as to the veracity of this.

More or less the production was likely done in the same way as Second Generation Colts, with parts sourced from Uberti and with finish work and markings done in the USA. I very much doubt that the actual frames were manufactured in the USA. This was not done at one of the high water points in the corporate life of High Standard. Production lasted two years.


Willie


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Old July 24, 2012, 06:54 PM   #8
Hawg
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Quote:
I very much doubt that the actual frames were manufactured in the USA.
Fingers knows his stuff. If he says they were made here I tend to believe it.
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Old July 24, 2012, 11:48 PM   #9
Willie Sutton
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Hawg... I stand in awe of his expertise in C&B trivia... zero doubt.

With that said I am a fairly advanced High Standard collector myself, and it's not a fully accepted thing in HS collecting circles that the frames were made by them. Right now I'll chalk it up as "ambiguous" knowlage".

Simple Occims Razor though... why would they make the most complex part when it could be bought as a raw forging from Uberti, which is selling them the rest of the parts?

Truth has no ego though..., and curiousity is infinite. Fingers, do you have any other data to provide? No challenge to your knowlage, which I respect. Just soliciting more if you have it, bearing in mind my particular interest in High Standards, not Cap and Ball per se.


Willie


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Old July 25, 2012, 04:16 PM   #10
Fingers McGee
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Willie,

I understand fully. The only information besides that on John Stimson's High Standard Data site and within the HSCA forum is an account from an old HS employee that Dr. JL Davis talked to at a shot shot years ago that said the frames were made in house.
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Old July 25, 2012, 09:43 PM   #11
Willie Sutton
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Got it, thanks. Looks like we all have heard the same thing from the same sources. It's not enough information to be fully confident in.

Gut check time... what is your own personal best guess? See any reason that they would make what they could buy as rough parts and finish?



Willie

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Old July 25, 2012, 10:48 PM   #12
Fingers McGee
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My personal best guess is to accept that they made the frames and used Uberti parts as stated by two sources that I have no reason to doubt.
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Old July 26, 2012, 12:37 PM   #13
arcticap
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Quote:
Got it, thanks. Looks like we all have heard the same thing from the same sources.
It's not enough information to be fully confident in.
Gut check time... what is your own personal best guess? See any reason that they would make what they could buy as rough parts and finish?
Willie
In those days before the Bamboo Curtain fell the U.S. easily had the world's greatest domestic industrial base and I'm not so sure that Italy had nearly as much industry as they do now.
I think that it may have been cheaper to have the frames made locally especially since turning raw metal into a finished product was a main part of High Standard's core business.
They did did make numerous models besides their world famous .22 pistols which saturated the market. And some of their other guns involved ground breaking designs at the time.
For instance, I have a Model 31 .22 rifle with an aluminum receiver marked "Alcoa" and having some other very innovative features including a unique 2 piece walnut a stock that over laps & mates where they are both held onto the receiver by a single screw. It's a very handsome but more expensive stock design.
And their pump shotguns were very similar to today's Mossberg except it had a steel receiver that I'll bet was the more costly way for them to be produced.
High Standard did tend to make guns more expensive and innovative then they needed to be in order to carve out more market share for their brand name.
It must have been a very sad day when the original High Standard Company closed their doors and basically went of business and was sold off. Especially here in Connecticut where it was originally located.

Last edited by arcticap; July 26, 2012 at 01:01 PM.
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