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Old June 24, 2012, 11:55 PM   #1
marklyftogt
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Swaging bullets

Anyone out there swage their own bullets or is lead the most popular?

Thinking about getting started.

Last edited by marklyftogt; June 25, 2012 at 12:05 AM.
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Old June 25, 2012, 05:28 AM   #2
GP100man
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I understand the process ,but never done it as the equipment is expensive .

And ya still have to acquire components or make em , over on the CastBoolits site they have a section dedicated to swagers & equipment.
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Old June 25, 2012, 07:39 AM   #3
Utah Shooter
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I actually do. I have a Corbin setup that I make them out of both 22lr brass and Copper jackets. Very fun to do if you ask me.

What cal of projectiles are you looking at making?
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Old June 25, 2012, 08:50 AM   #4
marklyftogt
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I am thinking about 9mm 115 gr rn and would like to do .357 158 gr swc.
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Old June 25, 2012, 01:19 PM   #5
c.j.sikes
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swage bullets

i use corbin swage dies for ss , using 22 jackets, fired cases, it cost about 850.00 to get into the game. if you have to buy jackets, it is exlensive. it is just a hobby, not for the faint of heart. buy cast lead bullets, if you want to save money. ben there done that for many years, lots of luck. corbin 541-826-5211. cjs
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Old June 25, 2012, 01:39 PM   #6
Edward429451
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I swage 451s on a Corbin press. I never went further because it is so dang expensive for dies. It is a very interesting hobby and even a beginner can make Match grade bullets easily.

Your 9mm rn and 357 would both take only two strokes to make, but you wont be able to use the same dies.

I've been saving 22LR brass while saving for the dies to make 224s from them and then the doubled the cost of the dies.
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Old June 25, 2012, 06:07 PM   #7
FrankenMauser
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I have about 10k .22 LR and .22 Short hulls saved up for .224" projectiles, and a few hundred .22 WMR hulls for .243" projectiles. But... all of my swaging fund got diverted some time back. So, I don't have a press or dies.

However, the urge to swage could not be ignored. So, I started working on this: .40 S&W for .44 caliber bullets
Total investment was under $50:
$5 - 7x57mm die set
$18 - Lee 401-175-TC mold
$7 - Hornady shell holder (for trimming)
$12 - Lee .430" sizing die
$.50 - "Ejector" rod from .295" polished O-1 drill rod

I do all of the swaging and sizing on my reloading presses.

Total cost is about 5 cents per bullet for bonded bullets (including flux and propane), and about 3.5 cents for unbonded bullets. They work very well in .44 Mag and .444 Marlin.

However.... this process doesn't convert easily to .35 caliber projectiles. If you really want something like a 115 gr RN, your best bet is a proper swaging press or a casting setup. Swaging pure lead (or close to it) in a Corbin Pro-Swage die will give you bullets that are too soft for 9mm pressure levels. And, you can't swage anything much harder than that on a reloading press (or in the R-type dies).

If you want jacketed 115 gr RNs, you definitely need a proper swaging press and matching dies. Modern reloading presses don't handle swaging operations very well, and modifications to make them stronger (and add leverage) push you up into the price range of a swaging press, anyway.

The problem with getting a Corbin setup, though.... is that it may take 2.5 years for you to get your dies. They'll ship the press as soon as it's available (and charge you for the full order), but the dies might not be produced for 24-30 months after the order is placed.
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Old June 25, 2012, 06:39 PM   #8
Utah Shooter
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Yeah I have been contemplting selling off my Corbin R-Type dies and getting into the Carbide Dies section of making bullets. I know some guys that make a great projectile with copper jackets in their Carbide Dies.
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