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Old June 7, 2012, 01:44 AM   #1
1Solo
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Remington 1100

Ok, I was just about to buy a Benelli Nova when I found out about someone selling a Remington 1100 2 3/4 Walnut Stock for $400. He said it comes with another barrel. I assume different choke because its not rifled. Sorry dont know much about shotguns. Looks to be in perfect condition.
Question is: Can I hunt duck and deer with it? He said hes shot a couple deer with it and he usually duck hunts. When I look up the 1100 though it looks like its a competition gun for skeet and trap.

IS $400 a good price? Can I hunt deer and duck with it?
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Old June 7, 2012, 06:10 AM   #2
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The 1100 has been around for 49 years, been made in several different configurations, and has been used successfully to do everything. $400 in the condition described with 2 barrels ain't bad. I still have my '63 version, and several others, and love them. And I duck hunt.
But, now days most people use at least 3" chambered guns for waterfowl because of the non-toxic shot requirements and the desire to shoot steel because it is the cheapest of those. A 2-3/4" version 1100 - which I suspect the one you are looking at is - is not that versatile.
You obviously have a lot to learn; we all did once and it's a fun trip so don't worry. A good pump gun with a 3" chamber is not a bad place to start.
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Old June 7, 2012, 09:31 AM   #3
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AT $400 with two barrels, an 1100 in good shape puts you Waaaay ahead !

I'd jump on it in a New York Minute !

It'll be good for anything you'd care to hunt, excluding long-range game & Elk/Moose.

There's many different types of barrels, new & used available to fit it, if the barrels don't work for your uses.

Heck, some have even used a 12ga for bear repellant.

.
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Old June 7, 2012, 09:35 AM   #4
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Yes, Yes and Yes !!

Depending on condition, this is a very good deal. Two years ago, I sold one of mine for that and it only had a slug barrel. Originally belonged to an old duck hunter and while I owned it, took many deer with it as that is the only type of longgun we can use, in the our northern tiers. The 1100's are and always will be, one of my favorite shotguns.. ...

Go for it and;
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Old June 7, 2012, 09:46 AM   #5
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I would opt for something a little more durable and updated like a Beretta 3901. Just my 2 cents, which ain't much...
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Old June 7, 2012, 10:27 AM   #6
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Remington 1100s were great duck guns in the days when lead shot was legal. They've fallen from popularity with the advent of steel shoot in 3" hulls. If you're going to use high density non-toxic shot (expensive compared to steel) 2-3/4" loads, then the 110 is a great choice. Otherwise, as has been mentioned, you'd be happier a gun with a 3" or 3-1/2" chamber for ducks.
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Old June 7, 2012, 10:44 AM   #7
1Solo
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I'd say its an early 90's gun. He said had it for a while but its in perfect shape, rarely used.
Why does he have 2 barrels? Are the chokes not removable?
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Old June 7, 2012, 10:52 AM   #8
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I had three barrels !!!

Quote:
Why does he have 2 barrels? Are the chokes not removable?
Because of it's vintage and that was the only way, back then to select a choke. It's very common to see this and many good, fixed choked barrels, got orphaned when screwed in chokes came on the market. ....


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Old June 7, 2012, 11:15 AM   #9
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Quote:
Are the chokes not removable?
Not all 1100 barrels have removable chokes. The early guns had fixed chokes. Before the screw in chokes of today, there were fixed chokes, adjustable chokes (Poly-choke) and externally interchangeable choke tubes (Cutts).
Quote:
Why does he have 2 barrels?
Remington made a variety of barrels for the 1100, some general purpose and others for specific applications. There's no telling why you gun has two barrels without knowing what they are.
Quote:
When I look up the 1100 though it looks like its a competition gun for skeet and trap.
Yes, some 1100s were made specifically for target use and they have Trap or Skeet marked on he receiver.
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Old June 7, 2012, 11:30 AM   #10
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All good information. Thanks. I'm going to take another look at the gun. The way it sounds a 15-20yr old 1100 in great shape is just as good, if not better, than buying a new pump benelli.

Can someone tell me more about the chokes for the earlier (80s/90s) 1100s? Is being fixed in the barrel any better than having it removable?
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Old June 7, 2012, 11:36 AM   #11
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Quote:
Is being fixed in the barrel any better than having it removable?
For a single purpose gun, I prefer a fixed choke. I feel they perform better and they don't require the extra maintenance required by screw-ins; but, I'm probably in the minority on this.
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Old June 7, 2012, 12:04 PM   #12
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Quote:
most people use at least 3" chambered guns for waterfowl because of the non-toxic shot requirements and the desire to shoot steel
This confuses me. <-- Not knowledgeable in guns.
They make 2 3/4 steel shot. Guess that is what confuses me about that reply.
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Old June 7, 2012, 01:20 PM   #13
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Steel pellets are lighter than lead pellets of the same size. Common practice is to go up a size to get the same knockdown. Downside is less pellets in shell, so you go to a shell with a larger payload.
Remington sells 3" steel shot barrels for 2.75" 1100's
t
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Old June 7, 2012, 02:11 PM   #14
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I've had an 1100 for 15 years or so--killed lots of birds and such. Walnut stocked models in great condition may bring $400, but not much more. If the extra barrel is a cylinder bore slug job, it doesn't really attract much more. It's also a 2 and 3/4" chamber. That doesn't hinder you if you have screw in chokes and are willing to buy a premium tube to improve your chances. Most will outshoot 3" loads in standard tubes. That being said, I've always been a pump man at heart, and the Nova will always be more versatile and reliable. Your choice on two great guns.

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Old June 7, 2012, 07:53 PM   #15
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You can get a 3" Steel Shot barrel for the 1100. Remington used to advertise it as good for the 2-3/4" receiver with steel, but I guess they have gotten lawsuit shy of late. I have one, and used it on my 2-3/4" receiver for 20 years with no issues and good success, but I decided to "retire" my 49 year old gun to clay pigeon duty. So I bought a 'new' 3" Magnum duck gun. A cherry 1966 Model 1100 Magnum, and I put the steel shot barrel on that.
They still make 1100s, but most are Sporting Clays models starting at $1000+. Nice guns.
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Old June 7, 2012, 08:00 PM   #16
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Quote:
They still make 1100s, but most are Sporting Clays models starting at $1000+. Nice guns.
Remember, after Remington introduced the 11-87, the 1100 was supposed to be discontinued; but, limited models were kept for target shooters. The line has expanded a little since then. If you want a new, general purpose, 1100 get an 11-87.
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Old June 8, 2012, 07:05 PM   #17
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They actually got down to where all they were making was black plastic stocked flat black 1100s, but demand brought them back. The early 11-87s with the early, and heavy, RemChoke barrels did not handle like the 1100 had, and some like me let them know how we felt about that.
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Old June 16, 2012, 10:23 AM   #18
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Quote:
He said it comes with another barrel. I assume different choke because its not rifled.
As has been stated, its hard to tell about the barrels without further explanation but just because the spare bbl is not rifled does not mean it's not a slug bbl.

Many old 1100 owners had a field bbls. (usually a longer bbl. with bead front sight) for small game hunting and a smooth bore slug bbl. (shorter bbl. with rifled sights) for deer hunting.

FWIW, the smooth bore slug bbl's shoot rifled slugs....

...and yes, since I love the 1100, I'd buy it in a heartbeat @ $400
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Old June 16, 2012, 11:37 AM   #19
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Everyone assumes the barrels are fixed chokes and the probably are that, but I didn't see where anyone told the OP how to tell if they were. You can just ask the seller if they are fixed or not, but it is easy to tell if you look at the muzzle end of the barrel. Assuming they are flush chokes (if extended you would know it takes screw in chokes), you will see 4 little square indentations that the nibs of a choke wrench or the edges of a quarter fit in so as to allow the choke to be screwed in and out.

It could be that the reason for two barrels is it came with a fixed choke barrel and the seller got a newer one that takes remchokes?

If the barrels are fixed, will they say modified or fixed (duh, full) on them?

Should he consider how often he will hunt duck and if not often if you could make do with the more expensive non-toxic ammo?

Last edited by TheKlawMan; June 16, 2012 at 11:54 AM.
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