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Old May 4, 2012, 03:55 PM   #26
dwhite
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Why, if you absolutely positively had to be at the very bleeding edge of .357 Magnum performance, didn't you just buy a .41 or .44 Magnum? I just don't get this.

You could get the same energy level with a lot less abuse to the gun. Also, since you've got a six inch barrel this obviously isn't a carry piece (or at least I don't think so) so the extra size of the .41 or .44 shouldn't be an issue.

You CAN pull a 6500 pound trailer with a Ford Ranger pickup but it'll be a LOT easier with an F150.

All the Best,
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Old May 7, 2012, 03:34 AM   #27
AZAK
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Quote:
You can post heavier data but need to include the warning described in the sticky at the top of the handloading forum
I didn't realize that I was posting this type of info. So, here it is:
CAUTION: The following post includes loading data beyond currently published maximums for this cartridge. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Neither the writer, The Firing Line, nor the staff of TFL assume any liability for any damage or injury resulting from use of this information.

I was just wondering how they achieve this performance while keeping in line with pressure limits; I suspect powder blending, and that was my question.

As according to Buffalo Bore:
"Heavy 357 Magnum Ammo - 180 gr. Hard Cast LFN-GC (1,400fps/M.E. 783 ft. lbs.) - 20 Round Box

Our 357 mag. ammo adds more power than ever before to the 357 mag. This ammo is safe to shoot in ANY all steel 357 revolver - this includes J frames. This ammo is no harder on your gun than any other normal 357 ammo. Please don't phone us and ask if this ammo is safe in your gun. It is, providing your gun is in safe condition for use with any normal 357 ammo.

We don't recommend this ammo to be fired in super light alloy revolvers as bullets may jump crimp under recoil, but the ammo itself wont hurt these super light weight revolvers. These revolvers are simply so light that the recoil is severe enough to cause crimp jump." (Emphasis by AZAK)
http://www.buffalobore.com/index.php...t_detail&p=100
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Old May 8, 2012, 08:43 AM   #28
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AZAK.

I'm not spotting any load data (specific reloading component combinations with charge weight, case, primer, bullet) in that post of yours at all. No need for the warning. Indeed, reviewing the thread's OP, even though 17 grains of H110/296 is a little over Hodgdon's current maximum, I think I had two posts open at once and actually meant to insert the warning into the other. A moderater moment.

Nonetheless, I'll point out I've had old lots of 296 distributed by Winchester that varied as much as 10% in burn rate (estimated from performance). Hodgdon says they have tightened lot-to-lot burn rate variations so all the powders they distribute now meet the 3% limit they have on the Hodgdon brand powders. They have set aside special lots that are right at the middle nominal burn rate for each, and do their load data development with those special lots. That minimizes the difference from any particular lot sold and their load data. So, for any powder distributed by them, Hodgdon's own load data is currently the best statistical representation. Old data put together by folks who bought the powder off the shelf before Hodgdon's tighter controls were in place may have developed their loads with a slow lot that genuinely required a larger charge to perform equally. No convenient way to know now.


To address your question:

I expect Buffalo Bore may be using Alliant's new 300-MP powder. Alliant shows a 125 grain bullet getting about 2000 fps from a 10" barrel with it and a 158 getting almost 1700 fps. Figure something like 150 fps less in a 6" revolver barrel. In most magnum handgun loads it gets a couple hundred feet per second more than we are accustomed to with H110/296, according to Alliant's data. It's just a newer formulation that is able to keep pressure up better in the bore after the peak to add more late barrel acceleration. That may mean the performance in short barrels isn't much improved over H110/296 and it likely makes a bigger fireball (I haven't got hold of any yet, so I can't say), but in full length barrels it could help.

You frequently hear the notion of blending powder suggested, but it's hard for me to fathom the powder makers would not have packaged such mixes for sale if they actually worked well. Duplex loads, where the powder is layered, is another possibility. That's almost more a loading technique than a powder quality, though.
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Last edited by Unclenick; May 11, 2012 at 02:49 PM. Reason: clarification
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Old May 8, 2012, 08:58 PM   #29
bfoosh006
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BTW... Read this article, it might offer some insight into the "quirks" of handgun ballistics.

http://www.leverguns.com/articles/ballisticians.htm

Note the drastic differences in velocities.
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Old May 9, 2012, 01:58 AM   #30
AZAK
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Thanks for the info on the 300-MP! I had not heard of it.

Like I mentioned before, I am a more middle of the road reloader; as opposed to hot-rodding. I have seen the results of a few friends "pushing a load a bit maybe too much"; I like my firearms and prefer to keep all of my blood on the inside whenever possible.
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