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Old March 14, 2012, 10:07 AM   #26
zullo74
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Hawg, You're a sick puppy!
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Old March 14, 2012, 11:10 AM   #27
Strafer Gott
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I know that it never existed in days of yore, but that SAA cattleman in cap and ball that Uberti puts out makes a swell shooter. Got one with 2 extra cylinders,and it makes a nice Colt replacement.
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Old March 14, 2012, 02:42 PM   #28
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Hawg, You're a sick puppy!
Not the first time I've been told that but I yam what I yam.
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Old March 14, 2012, 10:39 PM   #29
sandman_nv
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Oh hell..........
Just buy them all and hang 'em on the wall, I did!

That's the spirit, Hoof!

Awesome collection.
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Old March 14, 2012, 10:53 PM   #30
Bill Akins
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I've owned both 1851 & 1860 Colts and 1858 Remingtons.

There are plus' and minus' for both.

Remys plus'
1. Extremely quick change cylinder.
2. Stronger rectangular frame as opposed to Colt open top frame.
3. Easier to remove trigger guard and clean.

Remys minus'
1. Hammer located higher (than a Colt's) and harder for me to easily cock.
2. Stronger hammer spring (than a Colt's) makes cocking harder.
3. Feels "top heavy" and nowhere near as balanced (to me, my opinion) as a Colt 1851/1860.

Colt 1851/1860 plus'
1. In my opinion I like the balance of the 1851 & 1860 much better than 1858 Remy.
2. Hammer is more natural reach for my thumb than an 1858 Remy.
3. Hammer & spring is much easier to cock force wise than 1858 Remy.

Colt 1851/1860 minus'
1. Open top frame theoretically not as strong as Remy closed rectangle frame. (The significance of this is debatable depending on loads used).
2. Cylinder takes longer to change than a Remy does.
3. Sometimes get spent caps falling into gap between hammer and frame and jamming action, where this does not happen with the Remy.
4. More frame screws required to be removed to access bolt and bolt spring area for cleaning or replacement of parts.

Recently I sold my Pietta, stainless, shortened barrel, target sights 1858 Remy along with its "stainless like" R&D .45 colt cartridge conversion cylinder.

I kept my two nickel & gold 1860 Pietta Colts which are currently my only two black powder revolver handguns. Those I won't sell.

To me the plus' of the Remy do not offset the top heavy feel and lack of balance nor offset the much harder to cock Remy hammer. Not only much harder force wise to cock, but also feels harder to access with the thumb.

The Remy is a fine revolver. I've owned two of them. I just prefer the 1860 Colt personally. I like its balance over the Remy, it fits my hand better, and is easy and natural for my thumb on cocking.

With different people's hands and fingers being different sizes and strength, it's an each to their own thing and whatever works best for them.

The 1860 Colt works best for my hands. Someone else's experience may differ.





.
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"This is my Remy and this is my Colt. Remy loads easy and topstrap strong, Colt balances better and never feels wrong. A repro black powder revolver gun, they smoke and shoot lead and give me much fun. I can't figure out which one I like better, they're both fine revolvers that fit in my leather".
"To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target".

Last edited by Bill Akins; March 15, 2012 at 12:47 AM.
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Old March 15, 2012, 06:17 AM   #31
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You left out the greater tendency of the Remington to bind up due to fouling.
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Old March 15, 2012, 09:03 AM   #32
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The only time that the extra strength of the top strap gun should come into play is if you are going to smack someone up the side of the head.
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Old March 15, 2012, 07:31 PM   #33
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heres the thing i have never understood. there really is no evidence to support that a feller carried spare cylinders and swapped them out. if it was done, why hasnt anyone ever found one single photo from the period showing a person carrying multiple cylinders?


cylinder removal and insertion does take longer with a colt. if the wedge comes out its a pain, but with the remington ive seen on here that if you go to far with the cylinder the whole thing ties up and creates a real major issue to get it to go into place.
so toss up on that.
ive read a few posts on here about guys who didnt seat the ball down properly in a revolver. the colt guys seem to either pull the cylinder out pull the bullet out or they remove teh barrel, advance the cylinder by hand and reinstall the barrel and shoot.
on remingtons ive read of unlucky guys who spent the afternoon with a pocket knife cutting excess lead off the bullet till itwas flush with the cylinder face.
botha pain, but colt clearly wins in that.

the only time the remingtons come down to a clear victory is a rear groove sight that never changes from shot to shot. and longer longevity to the full frame.
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Old March 15, 2012, 07:35 PM   #34
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I like'em all, but have to admit that there's a special place in my heart for Colt.
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Old March 15, 2012, 08:22 PM   #35
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the only time the remingtons come down to a clear victory is a rear groove sight that never changes from shot to shot. and longer longevity to the full frame.
In most cases my Colt's have been more accurate than my Remington's but it only shows up from a bench.
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Old March 15, 2012, 09:01 PM   #36
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I purchased a Uberti Remington M1858 , the following are my comments on the Remington design.

It is clearly superior to any Colt caplock. Firstly most Colts have 12 visible screws. The Remington has six. To access the inner lock works on a Colt you have to remove six screws, three trigger guard screws, one mainspring tension screw, and two back strap screws. On a Remington you have to remove one guard screw, one grip screw, and one mainspring tension screw. The Remington only uses two side plate screws to hold in lock works, the Colt uses three. There is one tiny screw on the Remington cylinder hand that I had to unscrew to remove the hammer and the hand. Maybe there is a trick that I have not figured out yet. Unfortunately, something that is true for all replica actions, most screws are unique, and a couple will be so very similar that it is easy to start them in the incorrect hole.

The cylinder in the Remington design is easily removed by dropping the ramrod and pulling out the cylinder pin. The parts fit is tight and requires jiggling, but it is far better than the Colt. The Colt requires an involved process: First, removal of the barrel wedge. This entails loosening of the wedge screw, and then driving the cylinder wedge out to the side. For me I need a drift in addition to a rawhide mallet. The barrel is usually tight on the cylinder pin, I use the rammer against the cylinder face for leverage. Considering the loss of coordination under stress, the number of hand movements, the number of loose parts involved, it is hard to believe that soldiers in battle exchanged cylinders for a quick reload. I wonder if this is some sort of a myth.

In the seventy rounds I fired, I did not have one exploded cap jam the action. This shows the intelligent design of the Remington. The closed frame prevents a cap from getting between the hammer and the frame. It is not unusual in six shots to have one or more exploded caps come off a Colt nipple and fall in between the hammer and the frame. If a cap falls into the lock works, sometimes it takes needle nosed pliers to clear the debris. If you fire a Colt enough, you will learn to flick your wrist as you cock it, in an attempt to toss the busted cap clear of the revolver.

The Remington nipples are slightly angled outward, making it easier to push a cap on. The Colt nipples are perpendicular to the cylinder. There are notches next to the nipple which are just the right size to clear a capping tool. Depending on the colt replica, you do not have safety notches between the cylinder. The Remington has them and thus is a safer action.
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Old March 15, 2012, 09:05 PM   #37
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The Remington was a 1st Generation revolver, the Colt a 3rd, and the whole notion of the revolver was still pretty new back then, so they had a lot of refining based on experience to do.
Supposedly "back then they did" a lot of things for which there is no documentary or photographic evidence. Given the somewhat complicated and cumbersome photographic processes of the time there was little candid photography or snapshots, and i don't most photographers were interested in details of uniforms or armament, in many case Civil War soldiers hold firearms that are the photographer's props. Plus they tried to "dress up" for the occasion. I have read that the Battle of Blood River in South Africa on December 16, 1838 the Boers fightin the Zulus would put the lead balls in their mouths, after they poured the powder down the barrel they's spit a ball down it then thump the butt of their muskets against a wagon or on the ground to seat everything, prime, then fire. Makes sense, but they they actually do it?
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Old March 16, 2012, 04:38 AM   #38
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it is hard to believe that soldiers in battle exchanged cylinders for a quick reload. I wonder if this is some sort of a myth.
They didn't, it's a Hollyweird fantasy.
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Old March 16, 2012, 07:09 AM   #39
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I don’t understand anyone’s fascination with Remingtons. My first exposure to black powder shooting was with Remingtons, both original and reproductions. I became so frustrated with fouling causing cylinders to seize preventing both rotation and removal that I swore off of black powder for forty years. I guarantee I can swap a Colt cylinder far quicker than a Remington. A properly set up Colt wedge can be easily and quickly removed and, contrary to what some people think, without ever touching the wedge screw. The top strap design of a Remington provides absolutely no advantage for a black power revolver. The Colt design is plenty strong enough to perform properly. Cap jams on a Colt is a problem that can be managed with proper set-up and usage. However, the negative effects of fouling on the Remington cylinder pin is a deal breaker. Add to that the ergonomic advantage of the Colt design and the choice is clear. Colt beats out Remington.
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Old March 16, 2012, 07:53 AM   #40
zullo74
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Well said Joe!
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Old March 16, 2012, 05:35 PM   #41
arcticap
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokin'Joe
The top strap design of a Remington provides absolutely no advantage for a black power revolver.
The Remington top strap sports the rear square sight notch, or an adjustable rear sight on the reproduction target models.
Not that any of this matters anyway because who really cares about which guns another person prefers to shoot with?
I think that we're all just trying to offer a little bit of advice to others who ask for it. But only that other person can decide which type that they like better.
Since every gun that satisfies someone is a winner, it's not like there's any losers.

Last edited by arcticap; March 16, 2012 at 05:41 PM.
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Old March 16, 2012, 06:47 PM   #42
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I purchased a Uberti Remington M1858 , the following are my comments on the Remington design.

It is clearly superior to any Colt caplock
Clearly. That's why nobody debates/argues over which revolver is better.

One reason the Remington cylinder is so easy to remove is because the face of the cylinder needs to be wiped off every little bit to keep the gun from binding up. The Colt, with it's large axel pin and spiral cut grease grooves, will hold enough grease to keep the cylinder turning free for a very long time. I own two Remington copies, and five Colt copies. I like all of them. The only advantage I see with the remmie is the fact that it has better sights. When black powder is involved, the topstrap doesn't matter a bit.

Last edited by MJN77; March 17, 2012 at 08:20 AM.
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Old March 25, 2012, 02:59 AM   #43
swopjan
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Originally Posted by hoof hearted
Oh hell..........
Just buy them all and hang 'em on the wall, I did!
I thought I had enough C&B revolvers, but look at you! Challenge accepted!

So far I "only" have 11. I think. Fairly sure.
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Old March 25, 2012, 02:14 PM   #44
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I bought my S/A battery by the passions I had for each revolver. Got a standard and 5 1/2" '58 Remingtons, several Colt models and my favorite carry gun is the Piettia '36 caliber Police model.
I bought a 4 5/8" .357 Vaquero, I wanted the short barrel cause it just "Looks" right! and the chambering gives me the ultimate in medium bore power plus the economy of .38 Special reloads. (If I ever get all the guns together for CAS I will shoot full power .38 Specials in rifle and Revolver plus a .38 Cobra derringer for side matches), a economical choice as I am retired and on a fixed income.
I think that when you choose your "Classic"guns you should do it from the heart and buy the models that move ya! If a Colt Open Top does it then get one! If a .31 Remmie does it, pick it over the Colt, afterall it;s YOU that will be the shootist with it.
For Cap and Ball knockover power you can't go wrong with the .44 caliber but the .fully charged .36 can do the job so if you find a .36 that turns-you-on, by all means get it or you'll regret it later! I did that by not buying a Brass framed .44 Remington Shooters kit and to save a measly $20 I chose the Brass framed .44 Colt and have regretted it since...
I made the .44 Piettia into a shooter but somehow that big Brass framed Remington still stirrs my soul!
Most of all, shoot your guns as much as possible!
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Old March 25, 2012, 03:45 PM   #45
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As far as i'm concerned rems are more accurate but colts are easier to clean. Especially the barrel. you can take a colt barrel and look down both ends. Rems, you have to put your thumb nail between hammer and cone to check barrel. Am I right or is there something we need to know?

WBH
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Old March 25, 2012, 04:04 PM   #46
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That argument started long before any of us was born, about 150 years ago.

But one reason the Colt was liked "in the day" was because fired caps could be gotten rid of by turning the gun over or throwing it back over the shoulder while cocking. With the Remington, fired caps kept getting stuck under the topstrap and hanging up the gun. No fun when an enemy trooper is riding straight at you and his saber doesn't jam.

Jim
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Old March 28, 2012, 01:44 PM   #47
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I read somewhere that a civil war soldier would trade two colts for a remmy. May have been Remington propaganda though. All this talk about the cylinder pin on a remmy binding after a few shots hasn't been my experience. After a few cylinders, well, yeah if I don't wipe and lube the pin. Way I see it, both the colts and rems were for six rapid shots on the battlefield, and no more. After that - holster it, drop it, throw it or wield it for maximum blunt trauma on the enemy. I've never had a colt or a rem bind from fouling on the first cylinder.
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Old March 28, 2012, 02:18 PM   #48
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Way I see it, both the colts and rems were for six rapid shots on the battlefield, and no more. After that - holster it, drop it, throw it or wield it for maximum blunt trauma on the enemy. I've never had a colt or a rem bind from fouling on the first cylinder.
Then why did they invent combustable cartridges? If you never reloaded on a battlefield in a hurry, wouldn't loose powder and ball be all you need? I have read several accounts of reloading C&B revolvers on the field from the Texas rangers and their Patersons at Walker creek in 1844 through the Mexican and Civil wars, as well as several "indian" encounters. Colt put those deep grooves in the axel pin to hold enough grease to keep the cylinder spinning for more than six shots. Why do people think nobody reloaded a revolver in combat before 1873?
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Old March 28, 2012, 03:59 PM   #49
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If you have time to reload something, it would probably be your rifle. Depends on the heat of action. I can just see men reloading a colt or rem on the field during the action.
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Old March 28, 2012, 04:23 PM   #50
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You would have to be hid out to relaod anything from the muzzle. You couldn't do it on a horse.
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