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Old March 12, 2012, 04:08 PM   #1
dlbarr
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steel shim on a brass frame

I saved this pic off a thread on this forum but can't locate it a 2nd time. Anybody know where this is...I'd like to do this on my '51 Pietta to keep the frame from getting beat outa shape.

Any help would be appreciated....Thanks
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File Type: jpg Steel shimmed brass frame.jpg (185.5 KB, 80 views)
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Old March 12, 2012, 08:43 PM   #2
the rifleer
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Unless you shoot above the manufactures maximum load and you shoot 100 rounds a day for a year, you are not going to bend the frame out of shape.
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Old March 13, 2012, 12:27 AM   #3
arcticap
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Re: steel shim on a brass frame photo

That photo was posted on thehighroad by rifle in November, 2006.
rifle is also a registered member here on TFL and goes by the name enyaw.

See post #6:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthrea...+shield+washer
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Old March 13, 2012, 03:29 AM   #4
dlbarr
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Thanks articap, I remember seeing that now. Copied on a word doc and kept it with the pic. I'll do that fix sometime....maybe
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Old March 13, 2012, 07:53 AM   #5
madcratebuilder
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That shim well not stop peening on a brass frame recoil shield. It's the ratchet hitting the recoil shield that causes peening. The spacer in the photo is for keeping spent caps from jamming the revolver. These spacers are from the Manhattan revolvers if my memory is not to far gone.

Keep your barrel gap tight, .008 or so, and keep the load under 18grs for a .36 and 22grs for a .44 brasser and you'll be OK.
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Old March 13, 2012, 09:46 AM   #6
dlbarr
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Yes, I usually do keep my loads at .18gr. Just looking for a little extra protection In guess.
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Old March 16, 2012, 05:06 PM   #7
Smokin'Joe
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Recoil Pads

Instead of a steel shim I installed brass recoil pads on my brass frame ASM Wells Fargo


Drill and tap threads for brass screws so they line up between nipples when at full cock. File or stone screw height to match the height of the recoil ring.


Notice position of pads between nipples at full cock.
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Old March 16, 2012, 08:22 PM   #8
the rifleer
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What exactly is the purpose of the screws?
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Old March 16, 2012, 08:44 PM   #9
dlbarr
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I'm sort of wondering why not use steel screws instead of the brass? A brass screw is as soft as the brass recoil shield, right? So, theoretically, as the screws compress, your recoil is just going to be directed to the actual frame again anyway....right?

Not that I think your idea is not good, just seems that a different material would be appropriate.
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Old March 16, 2012, 11:24 PM   #10
Smokin'Joe
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The screws act as recoil pads adding to the rather small surface area of the recoil ring. The brass screws will not compress any more than the recoil ring will. Both the recoil ring and the pads can wear over time but with the increase in surface area the wear will be slowed. These pads do exactly what the steel shim is designed to do which is to deliver the shock of firing to the frame. However, no adjustment to nipple length is required since these pads are spaced between the nipples. Steel screws can be used but adjusting their length to match the height of the recoil ring will be difficult.
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Old March 16, 2012, 11:51 PM   #11
dlbarr
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Quote:
Steel screws can be used but adjusting their length to match the height of the recoil ring will be difficult.
Why?
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Old March 17, 2012, 07:19 AM   #12
Smokin'Joe
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Why?
Because I purposely installed the screws slightly higher than the recoil ring and adjusted their height to match the recoil ring using abrasives. The same technique could be used with steel screws but it would be more difficult.
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Old March 17, 2012, 11:08 AM   #13
Hawg
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Steel screws aren't THAT hard. A few more strokes with a file is all.
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