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Old February 17, 2012, 08:03 PM   #1
browninghunter86
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Ar-15 Cleaning Help

What is a good rifle bore cleaner to use?

Also do you put anything on the outside of gun to help it from rusting or getting real dirty? Light oil rubbed on with soft rag or something?


I just got my Otis cleaning kit today:http://www.midwayusa.com/product/636...leaning-system
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Old February 17, 2012, 08:18 PM   #2
Sponge14
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Do you mean as far as the chemicals or the hardware? I use one of those bore snakes with some of the spray cleaner from Walmart. I don't do anything special for the outside and plastics, just wipe with a clean dry rag.
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Old February 17, 2012, 08:35 PM   #3
browninghunter86
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wanting solvents/bore cleaners. Kit came with Otis CLP and I have some Hoppe's #9
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Old February 17, 2012, 08:36 PM   #4
Dfariswheel
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Any good bore solvent will do. There are plenty to choose from, pick one and try it.
Bore solvents will remove carbon and copper bullet fouling, so you should use one.

For the outside, wiping on a very thin coating of CLP Breakfree on all surfaces prevents corrosion and helps prevent wear of the finish.
Coating the aluminum parts will help prevent finish wear on them too.
Apply a thin coat to all surfaces then wipe off the excess. You want just a very thin layer.
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Old February 17, 2012, 09:02 PM   #5
Coach Z
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I really like the foaming bore cleaners for getting into all the locking lugs on the ar's chamber and then just normal hopes for the barrel and BCG
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Old February 17, 2012, 09:09 PM   #6
Chris_B
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Quote:
Also do you put anything on the outside of gun to help it from rusting or getting real dirty? Light oil rubbed on with soft rag or something?
The rifle will already have a conversion coating or similar, to protect against rust and corrosion. There's probably less steel in your AR than you think. I'm confused. What do you plan on doing that makes rust and a large amount of 'dirt' a concern?

Depending on the coating the steel parts have you may actually want to wipe it with a lightly oiled rag. Parkerizing for example is not particularly good at stopping rust but the oil it holds is fairly effective at it. That's why US military rifles such as the M1 Garand were parkerized
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Old February 17, 2012, 09:10 PM   #7
Bartholomew Roberts
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Any of the foaming bore cleaners are great. I like Wipeout.
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Old February 17, 2012, 09:40 PM   #8
Marquezj16
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Just follow the instructions that came with the kit. That CLP goes a long way.
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Old February 17, 2012, 10:28 PM   #9
Scharfschuetzer
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Browninghunter 86,

I am assuming that this is a new rifle for you. If so, here are some tips.

The AR-15/M-16/M-4 rifle requires some extra cleaning compared to other rifles like the M-14 or AK-47 that use a conventional gas piston and oprod to function.

With its direct gas impingement operating system, you get a blast of carbon filled gas into the bolt carrier key every shot. That carbon will build up after a range session and if you want to keep your rifle cleaned well, it will require field stripping the bolt carrier down to its component parts (firing pin, bolt, cam pin, firing pin retaining pin, etc.) for a good scrubbing.

I like to use a good solvent in preference to CLP for cleaning. When my lower receiver gets really dirty from sand or what not, I often default to hot water and a detergent.

The Army issues a combination chamber and barrel extension brush with brass bristles for the chamber and stainless steel bristles for the barrel extension. It won't work with your newly arrived Otis cleaning kit, but a rod long enough to reach the chamber from the rear of the upper receiver will do as long as it has the proper thread pitch. I'm pretty sure it's 8/32, but perhaps someone else can confirm that. I just use the issue jointed cleaning rod and it works fine.

If you 've been out in the monsoon in the tropics or a sand storm in the desert, you may want to remove the op spring and buffer from the butstock and clean inside that tube as well.

I also prefer a good solvent for the barrel in preference to CLP. Cleaning the bore is no different from other rifle barrels. If you have a chome bore in yours, it will resist rust, but it will still build up copper fouling after a while and a good brass bore brush and solvent will cure that.

Once cleaned and dried, a light coat of CLP in normal climates is in order, particularly in the high friction areas such as the four rails on the bolt carrier that ride within the upper receiver, the cam key, the bolt body and its locking lugs as well as the sear/hammer interface in the lower receiver and a drop of CLP on the hammer and trigger cross pins to lubricate those parts as they rotate on the pins. For extra lubrication, you can use a good gun greese like Champion's Choice or the myriad of others out there.

If I might hazard a guess from your user name here, the AR-15 is quite a bit different from your Model 1886 lever rifle.
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Last edited by Scharfschuetzer; February 17, 2012 at 10:36 PM.
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Old February 18, 2012, 05:06 AM   #10
btmj
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yep, what ^^ he said...

I remember when I first took ownership of a Glock pistol. All my previous experience was with blued steel long guns and revolvers. I came from a world where, if you touched a gun, you wiped it down... and if you didn't, it might develop a finger-print sized rust spot. I was just astonished at how little care was required of the Glock and how corrosion resistant it was. A properly constructed AR-15 is even more so. These things were designed to be abused.

The specialized AR-15 chamber brush is nice. I cleaned my AR without one for a while, but once I got the brush, I like it.

The first thing I do is break down the bolt carrier group, and put all the components in a plastic tub. I hose the components down with a generous amount of Breakfree CLP. CLP takes time to work, so I let it sit while I clean the bore.

For the bore I use a bore solvent with a bronze brush. Right now I am using breakfree powder blaster, but I think I will try something different when it is gone. I typically run the chamber brush first, then the .22 brush through the bore 10 times, keeping it dripping wet with solvent, then I run a couple of dry patches through to clean out the fouled solvent.

I have found it best to clean the muzzle brake/flash hider next. With my particular brake, Q-tips and patches on a .17 jag are needed, but every flash hider and brake is different. If you don't get the muzzle brake clean, your bore patches will keep picking up carbon from the brake, and you won't be able to tell when the bore is clean.

Cleaning the bore with patches is just like any other rifle. I use breakfree CLP, and alternate between soaked patches and dry ones, until the dry ones come out clean.

The bolt carrier group (BCG) parts that are sitting in the tub now get attention. I wipe them down with heavy duty paper towells, and remove as much of the fouled CLP as possible. I use pipe cleaners, jags of various sizes with patches, and paper towells to clean the nooks and crannies.

CLP does a good job of cleaning, and a good job of lubricating, but not at the same time. The trick to CLP is that when cleaning, use a generous amount, but all of the dirty CLP must be removed before the final lubricant coat of CLP is applied. As a lubricant, a little CLP goes a long way.

The inside of the upper reciever gets wiped with a CLP soaked paper towel, and then dry paper towels. I don't do anything to the lower.
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Old February 18, 2012, 05:21 AM   #11
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I use BreakFree CLP and then wipe the exterior down with a silicone impregnated cloth.
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Old February 18, 2012, 06:51 AM   #12
CTS
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Larry Potterfield of Midway gives a pretty good demonstration of the proper way to clean the bore. In the AR, I just break the upper and lower down, remove the bolt carrier group and charging handle, then proceed as he describes in the video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymyw7CLFWOk
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Old February 18, 2012, 07:08 AM   #13
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IMHO most folks over clean their guns. I well detail clean my AR's once a year. During the shooting season after a shooting session I run a pull through once or twice, quick wipe down of the BCG and exterior of the rifle. Unless your shooting crap ammo these do not get that dirty. I shoot xm193 and it's a clean burning powder. Look at all the documented torture tests of the AR with 10-15K rounds without cleaning and still running like a Swiss watch. The claims of DI is dirty and jams the rifle is way over exaggerated.

The #9 that came in the kit well be fine. Use up what you have before running out buying the flavor of the month cleaning aid.
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Old February 18, 2012, 08:21 AM   #14
Marquezj16
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^^^^yup that's about right^^^^^

I would add good chamber brush though.

How did my M4 make it through the sand and dirt and snow and mud with out all that detailed cleaning?
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Old February 18, 2012, 08:49 AM   #15
browninghunter86
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thanks for the info. And YES this is my first adventure with a black gun and lovin it so far. I did get the Otis chamber brush to go with this set so I think this will help alot
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Old February 18, 2012, 07:02 PM   #16
CTS
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I clean the bore regularly, escpecially on a new barrel. The BCG gets wiped down and I put a few drops of oil on the gas rings and the bolt carrier. Other than that. It gets a detailed cleaning only once or twice a year.
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Old February 18, 2012, 08:41 PM   #17
browninghunter86
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thanks. I have cleaned it twice in 50rds...not as many times as reccomended by DPMS
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Old February 24, 2012, 08:59 AM   #18
browninghunter86
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do i need to treat the barrel for copper fouling to help it shoot more rounds without cleaning or does that not apply to ar's?


like KG-12 or the Montana products?
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Old February 24, 2012, 09:48 AM   #19
Marquezj16
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If you have a chrome lined barrel and use a good good brush, you should not need other chemicals to get the copper out.

I usually run the brush through a few times with CLP then follow it up with dry cleaning patches until the patches comes out of the barrel clean. Then a patch with CLP and more dry patches until the patches comes out clean...
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Old February 24, 2012, 10:46 AM   #20
toolguy2006
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I have come to like "Gunzilla" as a solvent, and have been using Breakfree CLP as an oil. From experience in the military, Breakfree doesn't clean worth anything, but seems to be a decent oil. Also, you can use a silicone "Gun Cloth" for the outside, or several companies make product specifically for caring for the outside of a firearm.
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Old February 24, 2012, 11:07 AM   #21
browninghunter86
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thanks i believe it is a good solid brush it is the one in the Otis mil issued 5.56 cleaning kit. and is chrome lined barrel so I should be good
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Old February 24, 2012, 11:23 AM   #22
rebs
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the inhibitor

I use the inhibitor on all the working parts and hoppes #9 on the bore.
The Inhibitor is a great cleaner lubricant and rust inhibitor.

www.theinhibitor.com
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Old February 26, 2012, 06:59 PM   #23
Achilles11B
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+1 for Hoppe's and Breakfree. Good stuff.
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