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Old February 21, 2012, 01:27 PM   #1
Pond, James Pond
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Ruger Mk III pistol. Dry-firing OK?

As the title suggests.

It's OK with my Glock. It's OK with my Redhawk

Is it OK, or is it damaging to habitually dry fire this .22 pistol (aside from pulling the triggger after checking the chamber) as part of a practice regime at home?

Unlike my Redhawk manual it does not explicitly say it is OK. But I've not seen anything (yet) that says it is ill-advised...
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Old February 21, 2012, 01:35 PM   #2
Pond, James Pond
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The Ruger MkIII pistol: bridging markets.

I collected my Ruger MkIII today , and I've decided that this fine firearm not only allows one to shot cheaply and so practice one's technique, but after a fraught 15 minutes of disassembly, I've decided that it also serves as one of those head-busting 3D puzzles.....

Did they actually sit down and try to make it complicated?!
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Old February 21, 2012, 01:42 PM   #3
Slopemeno
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The Ruger Mk-I, II, and III's all have a pin in the bolt that stops the forward progress of the firing pin from hitting the barrel. It's fine to dry fire them.

I've dry fired my Mk-II thousands of times. It's a great skill builder- just make certain the gun is unloaded before you do so.

Reassembly isn't too bad- just know where the hammer strut is. When you learn "the flip" it'll seem easy.
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Old February 21, 2012, 01:43 PM   #4
sigcurious
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If you go to the ruger website under techtips or something like that they have a video for the fieldstrip of the mkIIIs. It's a good video, however even if you do all the steps right you might find the parts fit so tightly that it's still not easy.

From the Ruger website:

Yes. The Mark III has a firing pin stop that prevents the firing pin from contacting the rear of the barrel and damaging the edge of the chamber. If you are going to dry fire the pistol extensively, the stop pin and firing pin will eventually wear and contact could occur, and we recommend replacing both the firing pin and the firing pin stop from time to time. You should also monitor the contact of the firing pin with the rear of the barrel.

However you can always just play it safe and get some drywall anchors(I forget which size) they hold up better than the plastic snap caps. Azoom makes aluminum dummy rounds which I've seen used as snap caps, but on the package it clearly states not to be used as a snap cap. So I'm not sure what the verdict is on going that route.
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Old February 21, 2012, 01:51 PM   #5
stu925
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Great guns, I'm sure you'll be very happy with your purchase. You may want to consider getting rid of the Magazine Disconnect though, there is a couple of ways to do it. There is a guy named Sam Lam over at rimfire central that sells a new Ruger Mark III hammer bushing for $11 shipped. The bushing replaces the old hammer bushing and magazine disconnect, this makes disassembly/reassembly easier and makes empty magazines drop freely from the gun. A worthwhile investment and you retain the old parts in case it needs to go back to Ruger for some reason.

Stu
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Old February 21, 2012, 04:30 PM   #6
bitttorrrent
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i was wondering that too, manual says ok to dry fire after clearing and checking, but I have never practiced with it by dry firing - mine is mk II.

But sounds like others have thousands of times, so I guess is ok.
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Old February 21, 2012, 04:52 PM   #7
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there are .22 snap caps made out of some gummy material, they dont stand up as long as center-fire snap caps, but i suppose they work better than aluminum .22 "dummy rounds"

As for the OP, im under the impression that by design the ruger mark is one of the few rimfires that is safe to dryfire, so ill echo whats been said. I wouldn't overdo it though, I use the gummy snap caps, cheap enough for me.
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Old February 21, 2012, 06:59 PM   #8
zippy13
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Did they actually sit down and try to make it complicated?!
Yep. If not, then they would have changed the design years ago.
Typically, rim fires don't like to be dry fired without snap caps/dummy rounds. My buddy has an ancient Colt Lightning rim fire rifle that's been dry fired to the extent that you can no longer load a round because the chamber throat is damaged.
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Old February 21, 2012, 07:59 PM   #9
j2flan
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I have a MK11 that has been dry fired since 1988 and 3yrs on a MK111. Don`t know how many times, but a lot, and have yet to see any damage done.
Feild stripping is really fast and easy after a few times. I put the SAM LAM (recomend) bushing in the MK111 to make it strip like a MK11.
DETAIL STRIP, now that takes a few minutes, at least for me, I seem to loose the safety plunger every time
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Old February 21, 2012, 08:36 PM   #10
stu925
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Quote:
DETAIL STRIP, now that takes a few minutes, at least for me, I seem to loose the safety plunger every time
Mine fell out while installing the Sam Lam hammer bushing, took me a while to figure out where it came from since I didn't see it fall. I'm told a small dab of grease on it will keep it in place though. I also had the trigger spring and spring plunger drop out of the pistol, but it was pretty obvious where they came from.

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