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Old February 20, 2012, 04:17 PM   #1
WheelGunRealGun
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Big Bore Home Defense Revolver Help?

I'm getting a big bore low pressure revolver for home defense.

I've narrowed it down to the Ruger Super Redhawk Alaskan (which, if I can handle the weight, might work as a CCW). I would only be shooting .45 Colts through this. Or the S&W M25 .45 Colt. The S&W design is 100 years old and is well proven. The SRH is a relatively new design.

Which would last longer, in terms of rounds fired, and why? How would one know the Alaskan would if it's a newer design?

Last edited by WheelGunRealGun; February 20, 2012 at 06:32 PM.
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Old February 20, 2012, 06:32 PM   #2
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Old February 20, 2012, 06:41 PM   #3
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You'll never wear either out.
You'll wear yourself and your bank account out trying to do it.
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Old February 20, 2012, 07:26 PM   #4
black mamba
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The SRH is a much heavier built weapon, and will withstand much higher pressure loads (this has been tested and is established fact). It then stands to reason that lighter loads will stress it less than the same loads will the S&W, so it will last longer. That is not the same thing as saying the S&W will fail you. I think you would have to shoot tens of thousands of rounds of factory (not +P) 45 Colt loads before it started to loosen up.
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Old February 20, 2012, 10:37 PM   #5
WheelGunRealGun
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Quote:
The SRH is a much heavier built weapon, and will withstand much higher pressure loads (this has been tested and is established fact).
Where has it been tested?
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Old February 20, 2012, 11:31 PM   #6
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If you're considering buying the Ruger SRH Alaskan that was designed for .454 Casull and shooting .45 Colt in it, then you should never wear that gun out. The .454 Casull is one of the highest pressure standard production rounds available.
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Old February 21, 2012, 06:23 AM   #7
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Quote:
The SRH is a much heavier built weapon, and will withstand much higher pressure loads (this has been tested and is established fact). It then stands to reason that lighter loads will stress it less than the same loads will the S&W, so it will last longer. That is not the same thing as saying the S&W will fail you. I think you would have to shoot tens of thousands of rounds of factory (not +P) 45 Colt loads before it started to loosen up.
What he said!! I use to own a 454 Alaskan and it was a breeze to shoot 45 LC rounds out of. Caliber changes and no longer shooting SASS (45 LC), I now own a Alaskan in 44 mag. Same with this gun which is my carry/house gun. Simply Rugged makes a low profile pancake holster for the Alaskan that also can be worn inside the pants. http://www.simplyrugged.com/ I also own smiths, but for the big rounds I'd lean towards the Ruger. Smithy.
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Old February 21, 2012, 06:58 AM   #8
nate45
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Quote:
I'm getting a big bore low pressure revolver for home defense.
Why?

Quote:
I've narrowed it down to the Ruger Super Redhawk Alaskan (which, if I can handle the weight, might work as a CCW).
It is a CCW handgun, for defense against bears.

All the threads you've started asking questions and this is what you've come up with?
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Old February 21, 2012, 07:13 AM   #9
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Either will work well for you, if over-penetration is not a factor...thin walls in apartments etc...and they may be too big in the grips for your wife or GF to handle depending on her hand size...just a cpl thoughts...Rod
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Old February 21, 2012, 07:30 AM   #10
RichB69
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Ruger Blackhawk

I keep a New Super Blackhawk in 44mag in my bedstand loaded with 44 spec. over penetration could be a problem??? I figure if I miss with the bullet it will set the B.G on fire.


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Old February 21, 2012, 10:57 AM   #11
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Either one will last a lifetime. If you get the Ruger when you run out of bullets you can use it as a club and pistol whup'm.
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Old February 21, 2012, 11:07 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackMamba
The SRH is a much heavier built weapon, and will withstand much higher pressure loads (this has been tested and is established fact).
Quote:
Originally Posted by WheelGunRealGun
Where has it been tested?
It hasn't - he's just making forum noise.

But I'm wondering why you wouldn't prefer a 357 revolver instead? The Ruger Alaskan is a very large & heavy chunk of steel. A S&W N-Frame revolver is still a large handful. There are a lot of revolvers chambered for .357, .45acp that would be much better "home defense". A lot of firearms would be much better home defense than the Alaskan.

This is America and you can buy what you want. But you posted about "home defense" and "ccw" which are two areas where the Alaskan kindof sucks. For example, you could get a Glock model 23 which would give you 4" barrel 357Mag power, 13 shots, rust free, easy maintenance, easily CCW'able, for $500 new. Or for pure home defense you could get a Mossberg M500 shotgun for $200 used that would last you and your heirs forever.

Last edited by totaldla; February 21, 2012 at 11:16 AM.
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Old February 21, 2012, 11:13 AM   #13
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The question between the two revolvers is really which one you can shoot better under presure.

In a defense situation pointability is the most important issue. Does the weapon naturally line up on target when you draw and present.

For me the Ruger Double actions do not work. The sights are low and left when I draw and bring up to the target. At 25 yds, without conciously adjusting the alignment I miss a standard silloute target.

The Smiths sights line up on line and front sight a little high. At 25 yards with out adjusting the sight alignment I place the rounds just above the 10 ring on the same target.

The test I use when selecting a pistol is to:

Grip the pistol. bring it up to the target. align the sights. Close your eyes and lower the weapon to waist level.

With your eyes closed bring the weapon back to a shooting position. Open your eyes. The sights should be aligned and , depending on your muscle memory be on target.

If the pistol does not remain aligned then try several others in the same model. (Despite modern manufacturing techniques grips vary between individual weapons) If you can't find one that aligns in that model, go to a different brand.
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Old February 21, 2012, 11:18 AM   #14
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SRH is overkill--wrt heavy/ dutiness--for a hd/sd set up IMO. Get something along the lines of a Charter.Arms Bulldog or Rossi, or pricier S&W - both in .44 Special and call it a day. SRH = target and hunting only in my view. However, no question it'll certainly work -- Yes, in SD role, it will last forever.
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Old February 21, 2012, 12:35 PM   #15
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For those of you who are skeptical of the strength differences between the different 45 Colt revolvers on the market, here are some articles for you to read:

http://www.chuckhawks.com/high-pressure45.htm

http://www.sixguns.com/range/454_super_redhawk.htm

http://www.realguns.com/archives/119.htm

http://archives.gunsandammo.com/cont...-45-colt-loads

The bottom line with all these articles is that the Colt SAA and clones are put in a category together with the S&W Mod. 25 to fire ammunition not above 14000 psi. All Ruger 45 Colt revolvers other than the new small frame Vaqueros (a Colt SAA clone) are safe with up to 32000 psi loads.

That sounds stronger to me. If it doesn't to you, then proceed at your own risk.
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Old February 21, 2012, 12:37 PM   #16
Clifford L. Hughes
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WheelGunRealGun:

Why don't you find a nice Smith & Wesson model 625 in 45 auto rim. With moon clips it shoots .45 acp. With mine and 200 grain Hornady XTP bullets I took out a large wild boar.

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Old February 21, 2012, 03:24 PM   #17
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Clifford, I think you mean to say "Model 625 in .45 ACP". This will fire the .45 Auto Rim just fine. But you will never find one marked for the .45 Auto Rim. And I fully agree with your recommendation.

Quote:
The S&W design is 100 years old
Actually, it isn't. The lockwork inside the S&W wheelguns has evolved over the years. If you are familiar with the modern ones, or even those since oh, the early 1950s, and then you operate a Model 1917 or a real Triple Lock .44, you will see that. The old ones needed the hammer to be pulled back much farther to reach full cock, for example.

However, the "tried and true" concept is valid in that post.

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Old February 21, 2012, 07:33 PM   #18
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Quote:
Where has it been tested?
Ruger SRH:
It was first tested at the battle of the Little Big Horn. Custer had
one in .45 LC. An Indian has it now. Another test was at the Little
Bohemia shootout with the FBI. John 'Three Fingered Jack' Hamilton
had one, again in .45LC. Ma Barker was the last person known to
have that gun. That's all the tests that I know about, but be very
careful about what you read on the internet.
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Old February 21, 2012, 08:14 PM   #19
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Ditto on the 625 as a house gun, either in .45ACP or .45AR. If you like big guns this is the good medicine. Load with good 230 gr. JHPs. Far more practical, useful, and handier than a SRH, IMO. You will never wear out a 625 shooting .45s either.
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Old February 21, 2012, 08:59 PM   #20
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For me the Ruger Double actions do not work. The sights are low and left when I draw and bring up to the target.
This isn't the gun. Focus upon trigger control. Grant Cunningham has some good pointers on trigger control in his book The Gun Digest Book of the Revolver.

Both guns are good. I like both guns.
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Old February 21, 2012, 09:24 PM   #21
Mr.RevolverGuy
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Either will get the job done especially if you are going to only use store purchased saami spec 45colt ammo.

Hope this helps here is a review of the Alaskan
http://www.dayattherange.com/?p=920
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Old February 21, 2012, 09:49 PM   #22
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Have you considered the standard Redhawk? Last I looked, the 4" barrel version can be had in .45 Colt...a big gun to be sure, but certainly less so than the Super.
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Old February 21, 2012, 09:50 PM   #23
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I am an unabashed fan of the .45LC

Quote:
I'm getting a big bore low pressure revolver for home defense.
Quote:
Why?
Well, for starters, a big slug that is effective, no wear on the gun, easy to shoot, low blast/muzzle flash/noise, easy to handload...and if you want to push it a bit...

I have some faith in this guy's testing and conclusions (Taffin):
http://www.handloads.com/articles/default.asp?id=12
And this guy is no slouch either (Linebaugh):
http://www.customsixguns.com/writing...g_the_myth.htm

My 4" M25 is one of the last revolvers I would ever part with.

Last edited by orionengnr; February 21, 2012 at 09:57 PM.
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Old February 21, 2012, 10:06 PM   #24
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Quote:
You'll never wear either out. You'll wear yourself and your bank account out trying to do it.
I have heard this about Rugers before, but as soon as someone reports one wearing out and Ruger not replacing it man do people jump on him!:

http://thefiringline.com/forums/show...hlight=replace
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Old February 21, 2012, 10:11 PM   #25
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Have you considered getting a Serbu and firing 70 caliber slugs out of it ?

That's a big bore...
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