The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old February 15, 2012, 06:11 PM   #1
CrustyFN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 4, 2006
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 2,258
Dang scale

I have a Pact BBKII digital scale I have been using for five years and it has been a good scale. Well I went down to do some reloading tonight and the scale won't zero. I guess I'll stop on the way home tomorrow and see what a RCBS beam scale cost local.
__________________
I don't ever remember being absent minded.
CrustyFN is offline  
Old February 15, 2012, 06:40 PM   #2
rg1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 6, 2001
Posts: 760
Check this post about resetting your scale. Worth a try:
http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?p=662519
rg1 is offline  
Old February 15, 2012, 06:45 PM   #3
Daggitt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 11, 2011
Posts: 321
I like my Frankford Arsenal digital scale but I use the balance beam scale to double check periodically.

Last edited by Daggitt; February 15, 2012 at 06:53 PM. Reason: I misread the OP
Daggitt is offline  
Old February 15, 2012, 07:35 PM   #4
jaguarxk120
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 28, 2008
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,943
Just follow what the post saysabout recalibrating the scale and you should be OK.
jaguarxk120 is offline  
Old February 15, 2012, 07:52 PM   #5
CrustyFN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 4, 2006
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 2,258
Well I just went down to plug it in to try to reset it and it's working fine now. Thanks for the link rg1 if I have any more problems I will try that.
__________________
I don't ever remember being absent minded.
CrustyFN is offline  
Old February 15, 2012, 08:11 PM   #6
1Hobie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 6, 2010
Location: west central Illinois
Posts: 272
I bought a set of check weights from RCBS and periodically check the calibration of my Dillon scale. As with everything to do in re-loading, accuracy and repeatability are critical.
The weights add piece of mind.
Regards,
Hobie
1Hobie is offline  
Old February 15, 2012, 08:42 PM   #7
hounddawg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 1, 2009
Posts: 760
I have pretty much gave up on the electronics. They only last a year or so for me then readings get screwy. I have a RCBS 750 that I can leave on 24 hours and by the time I weigh out 50 charges can dump the charge from the first case back on the scale and it will read .2 or .3 grains different than when I put it in the case an hour before.
__________________
Government is like a baby. An alimentary canal with a big appetite at one end and no sense of responsibility at the other. - Ronald Reagan
hounddawg is offline  
Old February 15, 2012, 09:56 PM   #8
Shootest
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 9, 2011
Location: Just outside Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 626
I have never trusted the electronics, they are just made too cheaply for me to have confidence in.
__________________
The private ownership of firearms is an American Heritage. Anyone who disputes that is Anti-American and unpatriotic.
NRA Life Member
http://s1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/Wynn3/
Shootest is offline  
Old February 15, 2012, 10:12 PM   #9
amamnn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 13, 2006
Location: WA, the left armpit of the USA
Posts: 1,323
Keeping static electricity under control on your bench will help you to avoid a repeat of the problem. Also, a line filter can keep power spikes from doing the same thing. Power spikes can happen without you even knowing it--someone running a vacuum cleaner or even a fan at the other end of the house can do it if the circuits are right and the motor is noisy, electrically. You don't necessarily have to see sparks flying from your fingers when petting the dog to be having static problems in the house. The PACT reset procedure is something worth reading and writing down. It works on both their scales.

Static prevention mats on the bench are an affordable item these days--several online sources for them. A line filter that will work well can be made very cheaply or maybe even for free. If you have or can get, a strong magnet, just place it on the power cord about 4 to 6 inches from your scale. The magnet I use is VERY strong, but I don't wear a mechanical watch so that is not an issue. My magnet works quite well no matter how I orient it on the cord--poles parallel or perpendicular to the lay of the cord - makes no difference.

I was able to test the line filter idea because I use a new electronic dehumidifier in my loading room. When I wanted to use my scale I had to turn off the dehumidifier because it was so noisy I could not use the scale, the dispenser, or even hear the radio there was so much noise on the circuit. Magnets on all the powder cords for these devices fixed the problem.

6mmbr.com had an article in the tech section about this- and recommends a seller. I have not fooled around with weaker magnets than the ones I use, but I would guess that to be effective, they need to be a little stronger than the refrigerator door magnets you use to hang up the kids school artwork.
__________________
"If the enemy is in range, so are you." - Infantry Journal
amamnn is offline  
Old February 16, 2012, 08:55 PM   #10
deepcore
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 24, 2010
Posts: 364
Quote:
I use the balance beam scale to double check periodically
Same here. Both scales get set up side by side. With the check weights in the middle.

I bought an isolation transformer and it seems to be helping a lot with my digital scale.
deepcore is offline  
Old February 16, 2012, 09:10 PM   #11
1Hobie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 6, 2010
Location: west central Illinois
Posts: 272
Greetings,
Amamnn, could you point me in the direction about the magnet reducing or eliminating noise on an electric circuit? Understand that I'm not at this point disputing what you said but I've worked in various forms of electric troubleshooting for the 35 years and this is the first I've heard of using magnets as line filters. That doesn't mean that I know it all but a web search didn't produce any tangible evidence. Also power spikes are handled by surge supressors, not line filters. Two different animals as it were.

The 6BR.com thread that I read did mention not looping the cord as it could create a magnetic field.

Here's a disertation on line filters as I understand them. http://www.mitcables.com/pdf/powerline_noise.pdf

However, all that said, if the magnets works well for you, press on!

Thanks,

Hobie

Last edited by 1Hobie; February 16, 2012 at 09:16 PM.
1Hobie is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08521 seconds with 9 queries