The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old February 5, 2012, 07:46 PM   #1
bamiller
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 3, 2010
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 455
Screwed up. Need advice.

Please don't crucify as I just started reloading. Order of events:

1) Got excited when my new RL550B arrived.
2) Setup press per Dillon manual.
3) Ran off three 45 ACP rounds.
4) Loaded those three rounds in mags of a couple of my 45s and they chambered fine.
5) I ran off 100 more rounds.
6) Calipered after running the 100 rounds with following avg. results: .469 case base, .456 case mouth, 1.229 OAL

My question is... with 4.5 to 4.7 grains of Bullseye and the cases being slightly overcrimped and short do I have to worry about them going boom? If so, is my only choice to pull (and waste) the bullets and start over?

Thanks in advance for the advice.
bamiller is offline  
Old February 5, 2012, 08:06 PM   #2
Sport45
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 25, 1999
Location: Too close to Houston
Posts: 4,068
They're probably okay to shoot. But we need a little more info, like what weight and type bullet?

I don't think the crimp alone is going to cause problems unless it allows the round to seat too deep in the chamber.

Take the barrel out of the gun and drop a few in the chamber. If the base of the cartridge is about flush with the barrel hood you should be good to go. If they drop in much deeper than that I'd pull them.
__________________
Proud member of the NRA and Texas State Rifle Association. Registered and active voter.

Last edited by Sport45; February 5, 2012 at 08:11 PM.
Sport45 is offline  
Old February 5, 2012, 08:32 PM   #3
bamiller
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 3, 2010
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 455
Bullets are Hornady 230 gr FMJ RN.
bamiller is offline  
Old February 5, 2012, 08:43 PM   #4
Greg Mercurio
Member
 
Join Date: December 5, 2010
Posts: 78
Your loads are well below the upper limit for Bullseye, and .03" short. I don't think there's a problem in the making.

BUT:

Why not just put them in a puller and pull the bullet a bit taller, then reset the seating depth and you're done. It's just time you're trading.
Greg Mercurio is offline  
Old February 5, 2012, 08:55 PM   #5
bamiller
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 3, 2010
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 455
I'm more concerned that the crimp is too tight, thus causing excess pressure, than them being short. Or maybe it's not that big of a deal?
bamiller is offline  
Old February 5, 2012, 09:38 PM   #6
Hawg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 8, 2007
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 11,727
You'll be ok. It might be a concern at the upper limits. I load SWC's so they're always short to get them to feed through the mag. If you're worried about it pull them.
Hawg is offline  
Old February 5, 2012, 09:57 PM   #7
1Hobie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 6, 2010
Location: west central Illinois
Posts: 272
Not a big problem at least you caught it

Shoot them. Pay attention to the first ejected case. Yes they might be a bit hot.

Or be safe and learn a lesson and pull the bullets. You can save everything. Bullets, primers, powder, and cases.

It's part of learning.

Hobie
1Hobie is offline  
Old February 5, 2012, 10:08 PM   #8
Adamantium
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 6, 1999
Location: El Paso, TX
Posts: 992
No pressure signs = shoot them. I see no reason not to just adjust your press for future runs of ammo but it's your time.

My crimp is .469 which I've never had a problem feeding because of it.
__________________
New gun, same ol' shot.
Adamantium is offline  
Old February 5, 2012, 10:22 PM   #9
William T. Watts
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 20, 2010
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 779
My concern will the round headspace with .456" case mouth when the loaded round should be .470". I would be afraid the loaded round will be driven deeper into the chamber past where it should headspace on the chamber shoulder and not allow the case mouth to expand to release the bullet. I know it's no fun to pull bullets out of a 45ACP case (just done that) but I would rather do that than not have the under size case mouth not headspace correctly in the chamber. William

Last edited by William T. Watts; February 5, 2012 at 10:38 PM.
William T. Watts is offline  
Old February 5, 2012, 10:53 PM   #10
Hawg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 8, 2007
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 11,727
Do like Sport45 said and take the barrel off and drop a few in the chamber. If they go deeper than a factory load then pull them. If they're about flush shoot them.
Hawg is offline  
Old February 5, 2012, 11:13 PM   #11
Archie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 26, 2000
Location: Hastings, Nebrasksa - the Heartland!
Posts: 2,096
They sound okay.

That they are a little short is not a problem with lighter end loads. What you do NOT want to do is work up a full charge load and then seat the bullets deeper with the full charge load.

Bullet over all length has to be long enough to properly feed through the mechanism (semi-autos sometimes don't like short rounds) and short enough to fit in and out of the magazine. ALSO, the further the bullet is in the case, the smaller the burn chamber, so - all else being the same - more pressure. With lighter loads, that is normally not a horrible difference.

On the other hand, if your first couple rounds bellow and buck like the clap of doom and the empty is thrown a serious distance from your firing point; you may want to take those home and re-do the rest.

The good news is, I've seen .45 ACP ammo that blew out the bottom of the case AND the magazine, but didn't damage the pistol or shooter to any measurable degree. It's not recommended, but not as catastrophic as the movies make it out to be.

It is hard on undergarments.

If you have any factory loaded ammo, you'll have a basis for comparison.

Do take notes and come back with a report.
__________________
There ain't no free lunch, except Jesus.
Archie

Check out updated journal at http://oldmanmontgomery.wordpress.com/
Archie is offline  
Old February 6, 2012, 01:51 AM   #12
Scharfschuetzer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 28, 2012
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 293
Bamiller,

A few tips from my experience with the good old Colt 45 Auto.

If you don't have one, a taper crimp die is helpful for rimless pistol cases like your 45, while a roll crimp should be used for rimmed cases like the 38 Special. The taper crimp will allow adaquate bullet hold while still allowing the lip of the case to headspace in the chamber.

I don't think that you can crimp brass enough to cause any pressure issues. It is just too malable. You might damage the bullet though with too much aggressive crimping, but most dies can only crimp to design levels as the loading ram of the press will stop when the shell holder contacts the base of the die. Lee makes a factory crimp die that absolutely mashes the brass into the bullet. Not for use on rimless pistol rounds!

I use a maximum possible crimp on my magnum revolver ammo. A firm crimp will also help with uniform pressure build up and the standard deviation between velocities. Trimming cases for match shooting to one length will help in obtaining a uniform crimp pressure. Mixed manufacture cases will not always crimp to the same pressure even if they are the same length. For accuracy, trim to length and use cases of the same manufacture and lot. I like WCC or TZZ military brass for my 45s. It lasts forever and is uniform enough for match shooting at 25 and 50 yards. In my WW I 1917 revolver it is good out to 100 yards on the military E Type silhouette.

The extractor on Government Model 45s is a pretty stout affair and will hold a short case well enough for the firing pin to ignite the primer. The real danger with deeply seated bullets in pistol cases is a rapid rise in chamber pressure. The Government model and its 45 ACP cartridge do not handle high pressure well due to the feed ramp design of the barrel. That is probably why one of the posters above noted that he's seen magazines blow out of 'em. Always use enough crimp or a case with brass thick enough or sized enough to hold the bullet firmly as it feeds into the chamber. You don't want the bullet getting rammed down into the case and compressing the powder. It's not the gun that is weak, it is the brass case itself that has the propensity to blow out where it is unsuported over the barrel's feed ramp.

The design of the 45 uses a controlled feed from the magazine, so your extractor, if the 1911 is to spec and the extractor is not damaged, will always get a hold on your case as it comes out of the magazine. Feed your rounds only from the magazine. Do not try to single load directly into the chamber as the extractor was not designed to pop over the rim of the case that way. The 1911's extractor works like the controlled feed feature of the Mauser 98.

The above tip above my post about checking your case's headspace by dropping it into your barrel when it is out of the gun is a good one. You might say the Brownig type auto loader locking mechanisms have a built in headspace gauge.

Good luck with the reloading! What a great hobby. Some people say you save money reloading. I don't think so. I think that you just get to shoot more by reloading.
__________________
Scharfschuetzer
US Army Distinguished Rifleman
Washington State Distinguished Rifleman
NRA Police Distinguished Expert

Last edited by Scharfschuetzer; February 6, 2012 at 02:07 AM.
Scharfschuetzer is offline  
Old February 6, 2012, 03:37 PM   #13
bamiller
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 3, 2010
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 455
I dropped a few of my reloads in a barrel as suggested by a couple of posters then compared with a factory load and there is very little difference in the recess depth between the two. Actually if you weren't looking for it I don't think one would ever notice the difference. Still going to be a little cautious when shooting the first few reloads. Anyways I feel better now and thank everyone for their help.
bamiller is offline  
Old February 6, 2012, 05:41 PM   #14
243winxb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 26, 2011
Posts: 982
The bullet ogive will headspace on the lands at .953" Length. The diameter is .447" http://www.saami.org/PubResources/CC...0Automatic.pdf
243winxb is offline  
Old February 6, 2012, 09:21 PM   #15
William T. Watts
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 20, 2010
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 779
Scharfschuetzer

Good point, the extractor will prevent/limit forward movement, I knew the extractor had a grip on the rim just flat out forgot it, thank you for pointing it out! William
William T. Watts is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.10101 seconds with 7 queries