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Old January 16, 2012, 12:34 PM   #1
nyrifleman
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Calling all NEW YORKERS: your help is needed

I was asked to pass this along:

Repealing the NYS ban on "high capacity" magazines

Gun owners in Massachussetts have gotten the ball rolling repealing their state ban on "high capacity" magazines. It's time we New Yorkers did the same. This will take only a few minutes of your time. Also, please, please, please re-post this to as many forums as you can.

First, go here to find your State Senator:
http://www.nysenate.gov/nyss_senator_search/
And here to find your State Assemblyman:
http://assembly.state.ny.us/mem/?sh=search

Second, write them the following letter. It is RECOMMENDED to print the letter, sign it and mail it by snail mail. This makes it much more likely to be read and paid attention to. If you don't have the time to do so, you can send it to your state legislators by e-mail.

There are TWO versions of the letter. One is aimed at pro-gun legislators, while the other is aimed at anti-gun legislators (the majority, unfortunately).

Letter to Pro-Gun legislators:
Quote:
Dear <Legislator’s name here>,

I know that you are a supporter of the 2nd amendment right to keep and bear arms. I am a gun owner and voter in your district, and I applaud your pro-gun voting record.

I was wondering if any effort is being made or planned to lift New York State's prohibition of "high-capacity" magazines -- magazines that hold more than 10 rounds. This restriction does not in any way reduce violent crime -- FBI statistics show that violent crime nationwide has been on the decrease, despite the expiration of the national ban on "high capacity" magazines in 2004.

However, it places legitimate gun owners in legal jeopardy. The NYS ban relied on the fact that the Federal ban required all magazines manufactured after 1994 to be marked with the date of manufacture. Since the ban expired, most firearms manufacturers have stopped marking the date of manufacture, so it is possible for NY gun owner to buy a high-capacity magazine believing that it was manufactured pre-1994, even though it was actually manufactured after 2004. Law enforcement, however, can often tell the date of manufacture from the way the magazine is designed.

In addition to that serious matter, the 10-round magazine ban is an inconvenience for legitimate gun owners. Quite often, 10-round capacity magazines are more expensive than standard magazines. Many shooting sports require the use of magazines that hold more than 10 rounds, such as 3-gun, IDPA, IPSC and similar sports. Furthermore, a large number of firearms were originally designed with magazines of more than 10 rounds. This includes the majority of handguns designed in the past 30 years, and rifles produced in the past 60 years. Therefore, “high-capacity” magazines are not really high-capacity at all, but standard capacity.

I understand the legal atmosphere in NYS, and that getting this ban lifted would be a difficult matter, but you don’t get anywhere without trying. It appalls me that even pro-gun senators and assemblymen in New York take no active measures on such an important issue to many gun owners.

Notice that I am not calling for the repeal of the NYS Assault Weapons ban, but merely for the repeal of the ban on “high capacity” magazines.

I thank you for taking the time to reads this.

Yours Sincerely,
<Your name>
Letter to Anti-Gun Legislator:
Quote:
Dear <Legislator’s name here>,

I am a gun owner and voter in your district. I know that you are a supporter of strict gun control, but I wanted to call your attention to a problem in NYS gun law that puts legitimate gun owners in legal jeopardy. As you know, New York State has a prohibition on "high-capacity" magazines -- magazines that hold more than 10 rounds.

However, there is a problem with the enforcement of the law. The NYS ban relied on the fact that the Federal ban required all magazines manufactured after 1994 to be marked with the date of manufacture. Since the ban expired, most firearms manufacturers have stopped marking the date of manufacture, so it is possible for NY gun owner to buy a high-capacity magazine believing that it was manufactured pre-1994, even though it was actually manufactured after 2004. Law enforcement forensics experts, however, can often tell the date of manufacture from information unavailable to regular gun owners, such as knowledge of materials used and magazine design.

In addition to that serious matter, the 10-round magazine ban is an inconvenience for legitimate gun owners. Quite often, 10-round capacity magazines are more expensive than standard magazines. Many shooting sports require the use of magazines that hold more than 10 rounds, such as 3-gun, IDPA, IPSC and similar sports. Furthermore, a large number of firearms were originally designed with magazines of more than 10 rounds. This includes the majority of handguns designed in the past 30 years, and rifles produced in the past 60 years. Therefore, “high-capacity” magazines are not really high-capacity at all, but standard capacity.

Finally, this restriction has no effect on violent crime. FBI crime statistics show that violent crime nationwide has been on the decrease since 2004, despite the expiration of the national ban on "high capacity" magazines.

I am not in any way, shape or form calling for the repeal of the NYS Assault Weapons ban, but merely for the repeal of the ban on “high capacity” magazines.

I thank you for taking the time to reads this.

Yours Sincerely,
<Your name>

Last edited by nyrifleman; January 19, 2012 at 12:38 AM.
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Old January 16, 2012, 12:42 PM   #2
Brian Pfleuger
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I appreciate the effort and I have previously contacted my representatives on several issues but I am convinced the "chain letters" are ineffective.

I know what I'd do if I got a bunch of identical letters in the mail... I'd throw them away. I don't care if I agree with the opinion or not.... My opinion would be "Wow, they care so much they couldn't be bothered to type their own letter."

Write to them, call them, email them, yes. Please don't print a letter that a thousand other people are going to print and send them.

Have enough passion to think your own thoughts and express them in your own words.
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Old January 16, 2012, 12:53 PM   #3
Musketeer
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You do know who our governor is, right?

Positive change will only come to NY by SCOTUS decision or federal legislation. I am more concerned about holding the enemy back here while waiting for the cavalry.
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Old January 16, 2012, 03:26 PM   #4
Poodleshooter
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If I were an anti-gun NY politician, that 2nd letter would probably serve only to alert me to the fact that high capacity magazines were actually still available, and would likely cause me to propose legislation to ban ALL over 10rd magazines to eliminate this legal quandary you've presented.
The last thing you want to do is let those anti-gun legislators know about the various loopholes that they didn't intend to create when they passed the rather ineffective NY AWB (the existence of nearly identical post ban rifles, the fact that the ban on specific military styled models is eluded by the existence of "clone" rifles, redesigned silver soldered muzzle brakes to skirt the flashhider/threading rules, legal pre-ban magazines, etc).
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Old January 16, 2012, 03:35 PM   #5
jimbob86
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Quote:
I am more concerned about holding the enemy back here while waiting for the cavalry.
Nobody won a war playing defense only....... and the Cavalry may not be coming, depending upon the results in November.

Really, what's it cost to send a personal letter? An hour of your time and 44 cents?
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Old January 16, 2012, 07:15 PM   #6
Erikbal
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I also agree personal letters would be more effective.
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Old January 16, 2012, 11:57 PM   #7
Musketeer
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Quote:
Nobody won a war playing defense only....... and the Cavalry may not be coming, depending upon the results in November.
You also do not throw away troops attacking an entrenched position head on. Better to weaken them elsewhere and fill the courts with constructionist justices to ram the 2A down the throats of those states which will not honor it in their own legislatures.
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Old January 19, 2012, 12:46 AM   #8
nyrifleman
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Quote:
I also agree personal letters would be more effective.
Depends. A lot of the time, sheer quantity is much more important than individual quality. Some people don't have the time to write their own. Also, most of the time the letters are being read by a secretary/assistant who summarizes the general gist for the legislator. In that case, it doesn't matter if there are 20 different letters or 20 identical ones.

And I agree with jimbob: what'll it cost? 10 minutes and 44 cents?
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Old January 19, 2012, 09:24 AM   #9
Brian Pfleuger
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Quote:
Also, most of the time the letters are being read by a secretary/assistant who summarizes the general gist for the legislator. In that case, it doesn't matter if there are 20 different letters or 20 identical ones.
This has not been my experience. Every time I have written my state representatives I have received a personal response directly from them. I suppose it could be a secretary pretending to be them but I doubt it, based on the sometimes extensive conversations. They seem to get, read and respond to their email just like I do.

Since I have always received a personal response and in relatively short order, I also don't believe that snail mail is more likely to be effective or read. Fact is, in today's world, I would guess the opposite.
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The problem, as you so eloquently put it, is choice.
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