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Old December 30, 2011, 12:09 PM   #1
TexasJustice7
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S&W 625-5 Long Colt 45 CTG 4 Inch

I went to look at a S&W 696 revolver this morning, that I intended on purchasing from a good friend. He was mistaken about what he had, and
instead I bought a S&W 625-5 Colt 45 CTG 4 inch barrel and holster for
what I think is a good price. I never sell a gun, oinly buy them and this
is number four. Still wanting to find a S&W 696 44 Spl.

This gun looks like it is in great condition, some holster wear at the end of the barrel. Local gunshop only had $75 worth of ammo for it, got 50 of
the Magtec 250 grain rounds for it and and some Corbon HJunter Rounds, High Velocity Ammo. So can someone tell me what it is worth, (will never sell it), and whether these P+ rounds should or should not be used in this six shot revolver? It is quite a bit bigger than my CA 44 Spl but with a Fanny
Pack I can use it for vehicle carry, and home defense.
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Old December 30, 2011, 12:32 PM   #2
Hal
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Quote:
So can someone tell me what it is worth, (will never sell it), and whether these P+ rounds should or should not be used in this six shot revolver
Kick open the cylinder.
Look at the back end where the cutouts are for the bolt stop.
You'll notice they are, at their deepest point, directly over the chamber.

That's the weak spot on the S&W - the Colt SAA also.

The .44 mag S&W and the .44 spl SAA, have the cutouts in the same spot, but, because the cartridge is smalle in diameter, there's more metal there.

I believe that's the spot where Elmer Keith's .45 Colt cylinder came apart on him early on and why he switched to the .44 spl. & he mentioned that once in Guns and Ammo magazine when he wrote for them.
I could be wrong that he actually wrote that. He may have relayed the info to another writer that worked there and they published it in an article.

Ruger offsets the bolt just enough so the cutout has more metal between it and the chamber.

Bottom line - avoid anything in the Smith other than standard .45 Colt loads.
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Old December 30, 2011, 08:47 PM   #3
Shotgun693
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Quote:
the Magtec 250 grain rounds for it and and some Corbon HJunter Rounds, High Velocity Ammo.
Those rounds are just not needed in a carry gun.
Unless you're hunting very big game the 'standard load 'Colt will handle all your shooting needs. A 'standard Colt' load will allow you to shoot a 255 gr bullet at 900fps easy.
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Old December 30, 2011, 09:02 PM   #4
TexasJustice7
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Quote:
Shotgun693: Those rounds are just not needed in a carry gun.
Unless you're hunting very big game the 'standard load 'Colt will handle all your shooting needs. A 'standard Colt' load will allow you to shoot a 255 gr bullet at 900fps easy.
Thanks, I will return them tomorrow and exchange them out. I have to go back tomorrow shopping for a fanny pack big enough to hold this N frame handgun. They may have to put an order in for them. Do you happen to know if the S&W 625-5 works with moonclips. I have never bought any of those, mostly carry HKS Speedloaders for my CA 44 Spl and my S&W 38 Spl. I can't wait for it to get warm enough for me to get to the gun range with the S&W 625-5. Also any particular brand you would recommend for it? Standard long colt rounds.
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Old December 30, 2011, 09:14 PM   #5
orionengnr
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--Value--I'm going to say $650-750, assuming VG to EX condition. I had a 4" and a 6", and both fell within this range.
--Moon clips are typically used for "rimless" rounds such as the .45acp, and typically require machining the cylinder to provide relief for the clip itself.
--There are speed loaders available for the M25-5.

I had two 25-5s and currently have a 25-13. I have shot limited numbers of +p in each (10-15 rounds).
I would not shoot "Ruger/Contender Only" loads out of my M25s, although if you read John Taffin's article, he says that an M25 can hold up nicely to a good number of very stout loads, so a few +ps is not going to grenade the cylinder, or stretch the frame.
http://www.handloads.com/articles/default.asp?id=12
Linebaugh also has something to say about it:
http://www.customsixguns.com/writing...g_the_myth.htm

Each of these guys has a bunch more experience with the .45LC than most of us will ever dream of, so I take what they say pretty seriously.

BTW, I responded to your holster question on the other thread by pm. If you would like pics, etc, pm or email me.
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Old December 30, 2011, 10:00 PM   #6
feets
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The 625 is much stronger than an old Colt SAA style gun. It will take some +p loads. However, it will not take the +p+ loads.

There are essentially three types of Colt loads.
Tier 1 are for SAA type guns and cowboy action shooting. Expect to deliver 255 gr lead below 800 fps. Great for "social work" and plinking.
Tier 2 step things up a bit. You're looking at 250 gr lead moving up to 1200 fps or so. This is more than enough to anchor just about any game animal you're going to find in North America. Keep these out of SAA clones if you like having fingers, hands, and eyes.
Tier 3 is everything above the Tier 2 stuff. 300 gr bullets moving at 1300 fps. 250 gr bullets nearing Casull velocities. Big stuff. Ugly stuff. There's no real need for it unless you're trying to reach waaaaay out there or need to put down rampant Peterbilts that have gone feral.

Call CorBon and ask them. That's what I did when I found their 300 gr load at 1300 fps back in the mid 90s. My gun is a big Vaquero and will handle that stuff.
I can tell you that those kind of loads will be a handful in that gun.
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Old December 30, 2011, 10:24 PM   #7
mes227
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I have three 625s: two in .45Colt and one in .45acp. And a .325 Night Guard also in .45acp. It's a fantastic platform and an equally great caliber. I also agree about the comments on ammo - standard .45Colt loads make great self defense rounds - it's a very effective caliber against those with felonious intent. The higher power rounds that you picked up would be good if you're worried about larger critters, like perhaps wild boar.

One challenge with the .45colt is retail ammo availability. Most shops, in my experience, only carry a few options and they tend to be expensive. Best option is to hand load (which then makes this one of the more flexible calibers available) or to buy on-line (where you'll have a wide selection at prices comparable to other large bore rounds (check out CheaperThanDirt.com and Georgia Arms).

You also have the option of having the revolver's cylinder cut to accept .45acp with moon clips (and still also chamber .45Colts). this costs about $100 and is something to think about. This gives you broader ammo selection, reasonable cheap retail options, and a convenient way to quickly reload a carry piece (keeping loaded moon clips with the gun can be more convienent than loose rounds).
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Old December 30, 2011, 10:37 PM   #8
Andy Taylor
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I own two S&W M25-5s in .45 Colt.
feets described three levels of .45 Colt loads. The S&W are great for tier one and tier 2. Stay away from tier 3. I speak from experience on this point. It is also the reason I have a Ruger Redhawk in .45 Colt.
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Old December 31, 2011, 08:03 AM   #9
TexasJustice7
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Thanks for all the advice. I appreciate it. I know very little about the S&W 45's. I think since I am not likely to have to use it on a wild animal, I will stick to standard rounds, maybe some hollow points if I can get them. Looking forward to shooting this handgun at a local range when the weather gets warm enough. I hope that I can find a fanny pack at a local shop today that will hold the gun, and some more ammo for it. Last time I shot a 45 was in the Marine Corp in the early 60's, and it was not a revolver.
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Old December 31, 2011, 11:12 AM   #10
robctwo
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I've been shooting and reloading for the .45 Colt for a few years. All previous information is right on.

I have some "Ruger only" rounds that I shoot from my Rossi Puma 1892 20" rifle only. 340 gr at 1,200 fps. With the steel butt plate, not many at a time.

For range sessions I like a mild 200 gr swc. I've loaded a lot of Red dot, clays and Trail boss. Currently I'm using 6 gr of Bullseye.

My 25-13 is full of 255 gr lead swc with Universal Clays to run about 800 fps. out of the 4" barrel. Plenty of pop and good for follow up shots.

The .45 colt is one of the most versatile rounds going, but you really need to reload to get that versatility and to afford to shoot it much. Excluding the cost of brass the 200 gr with Bullseye is costing me about $12 per hundred.
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Old December 31, 2011, 11:43 AM   #11
feets
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I wouldn't bother worrying about hollow points with a Colt. The typical cowboy load is packing far more momentum than the cutesy high profile rounds loaded in the bottom feeder pistols.

Nines and 40s are well known to go through people with substantial exit velocity. That means they can go through multiple people.

If you're concerned with social work, stick with a typical low velocity load of average weight. A 250 gr hunk of lead at 800 fps is a fairly destructive thing. It will penetrate car doors and reach deep into the bad guy on the other side.

There's this little thing called inertia. A body in motion tends to stay in motion. More mass means more tendency to stay in motion. The bullet will travel far enough to get the job done but not so far as to take out three other people.
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Old January 2, 2012, 05:02 AM   #12
arentol
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Given that I have recently acquired a .45 colt rifle that can handle tier 3 rounds and a revolver that can only safely handle Tier 2 rounds (same as your S&W), I have done a little research into what is available. So far I found the following in terms of best prices and/or greatest power:

Cheapest Tier 1 practice rounds I could find:
HSM RNFP can be had for about $0.50 per round.
Fiocchi Cowboy Action for about $0.60 per round.

(HSM is the more powerful of the two.)

Best* defensive rounds (Tier 2) I could find:
Corbon Self-Defense JHP which is 200 grains, 1100fps, 537 ft/lbs, for about $1.45 per round.
Double Tap, either 185 grain nosler JHP or 250 grain nosler JHP, both at about 525 ft/lbs energy, both about $1 per round. Make sure not to get the +p stuff on accident though since Double-Tap makes both.

Best* hunting ammo:
For hunting Buffalo Bore makes a Keith style semi wad-cutter at 255 grains and 1100 fps, 566 ft/lbs that sounds pretty good. About $1.75 per round.
Corbon has a 335 grain hunting round that is one of only two rounds (both corbon) I have found so far that is above 600 ft/lbs and below 900 ft/lbs. I don't know if I would trust it in your gun though as it is on the high end at 820 ft/lbs. I certainly won't trust it in mine.

The Tier 3 stuff generally leaves the muzzle with more than twice the energy of the above Tier 2, and 3 or 4 times that of Tier 1. Definitely don't use Tier 3 stuff in any revolver short of a Blackhawk level firearm.

*(When I say "best" I am not speaking definitively or authoritatively. This is just what I found so far in my search that sounds good. If someone has better suggestions I would love to hear them).

And I second robctwo on not firing the Tier 3's too many at a time from a Rossi 92. The gun handles them just fine, but it will beat the heck out of your shoulder with that steel butt plate. Wouldn't complain for a second if I was firing them at a charging bear, but for general fun shooting, they aren't that much fun. The HSM RNFP rounds are a blast though and don't hurt a bit.
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Old January 2, 2012, 09:26 AM   #13
Hal
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I'm curious here.
Has anyone actually called S&W and asked them what level load is ok?
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Old January 2, 2012, 02:30 PM   #14
Jim Watson
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I strongly doubt S&W will publically approve of anything other than SAAMI specification 14,000 psi ammunition. This will get a 250 gr bullet to 900 fps which I think suitable for any of MY handgun uses.

Tex, I just don't understand a couple of things in the OP. You say

"I bought a S&W 625-5 Colt 45 CTG 4 inch barrel and holster for
what I think is a good price."

and
"So can someone tell me what it is worth...?"

Are you afraid you paid your friend too little? Too much? Or what?
The gun is bought, the money is spent, you say you won't sell it, so what is some stranger's appraisal going to do for you?

Nothing personal, the question is asked frequently on the gunboards and I just wonder what the point is.
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Old January 2, 2012, 05:53 PM   #15
TexasJustice7
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Quote:
JimWatson: Are you afraid you paid your friend too little? Too much? Or what?
The gun is bought, the money is spent, you say you won't sell it, so what is some stranger's appraisal going to do for you?
No, I don't want to know for the purpose of ever selling it, as I just won't. I am not in the best of health and when something happens to me, one of my family members will inherit my guns, and I want to pass that info on to them. I am certain he gave me a good price on it. In fact my friend in this case has offered to buy it back from me if I should decide I do not like it or want it.

I looked on the S&W website and notice they have the S&W 625-JM something, was wondering if that gun is much different from a S&W 625-5
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Old January 2, 2012, 06:44 PM   #16
feets
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The JM is tweaked slightly with beveled chambers for faster reloading with speed loaders and it's got a different grip. There may be other differences too.
I thought all JMs were chambered in 45 ACP. Maybe I'm wrong. I'm not a S&W guy.
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Old January 2, 2012, 07:10 PM   #17
Dale53
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The Jerry Miculek Special is a .45 ACP. It has an interchangeable front sight. The hammer and trigger is forged and flash chromed. Big "J M" engraved on the side. It also has a special set of JM grips. I have a 4" JM Special (625-8) and a 5" Model of 1989 (625-6) both in .45 ACP. I shoot them a LOT and consider them some of the finest guns available, period!

If you wish information on handloading for the .45 Colt in the Smith 625-5 you can hardly do better than John Linebaugh's treatise on this combination:

http://www.handloads.com/articles/default.asp?id=12

Congratulations on purchasing a fine gun.

Dale53
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