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Old December 27, 2011, 05:59 PM   #26
BIGR
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I agree peetzakilla. I had some pictures of one back in the spring.
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Old December 27, 2011, 06:08 PM   #27
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The DNR makes me laugh sometimes at their sheer stupidity and ignorance on subjects in which they should be the leading authority.
If they acknowledge it exists, then they have to "manage" it. If the animal simply "doesn't exist in this state", well, there's nothing to "manage".

Sometimes it's also simply better for the animal if it "doesn't exist".
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Old December 27, 2011, 06:10 PM   #28
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A quick-glance differentiation between a bobcat and a lynx, other than size, would be the grayer color of the lynx and the larger ear tufts.

I've only seen a lynx in a zoo, although I've been sorta up close and personal with a bobcat or two:

http://thefiringline.com/forums/atta...1&d=1122235264
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Old December 27, 2011, 06:51 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Eatman
A quick-glance differentiation between a bobcat and a lynx, other than size, would be the grayer color of the lynx and the larger ear tufts.
The long hind legs in proportion to it's body height, along with the thick fur on the legs are lynx characteristics as well. Helps them chase down bunnies in the heavy snow cover of the great white north.
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Old December 27, 2011, 09:23 PM   #30
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That's almost certainly a bobcat.

The stripes in the front legs and the tail in Pic2 almost exactly match the picture of the bobcat posted above
Yep, I apparently did not look at the pics very well the first time around. I didn't even see the stripes on the legs, pretty good sign. Also the coloration on the hind legs looks like a bobcat. Plus the 2nd and 3rd pics you can see the head better, it looks too wide for a fox and snout is short too.

Basically, it really doesn't look much at all like a fox, and a lot like a bobcat.
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Old December 27, 2011, 10:07 PM   #31
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Linx has big feet to help going through the snow ! It was a lynx !
One comment I saw was that a 30 lb lynx has bigger feet than a 200 lb mountain lion !!
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Old December 28, 2011, 12:09 AM   #32
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I'm not too sure the place I found the bobcat and lynx photos at really know which is which. Need to look on some biology source I guess but let's try this for now.....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynx

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobcat

Looks like a Lynx to me....


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Attached Images
File Type: jpg 762px-Canadian_lynx_by_Keith_Williams.jpg (63.2 KB, 18 views)
File Type: jpg Calero_Creek_Trail_Bobcat.jpg (213.5 KB, 18 views)
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Old December 28, 2011, 12:28 AM   #33
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Let's add a poll
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Old December 28, 2011, 11:22 AM   #34
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Back some fifty years ago, a family in Fort Lauderdale found a little spotted kitten. They took it in and raised it. But it was a fighting little dude, whipping the neighborhood dogs. In one fight it got a couple of cuts so they took it to the vet. When they got it back, the bill was up around $150. They were shocked and asked why so high.

The vet explained that Florida law required that he pull the eyeteeth and front claws, for people to be able to have a pet bobcat.
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Old December 28, 2011, 11:49 AM   #35
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Now that It's pointed out I do see the stripes on the animal
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Old December 30, 2011, 07:50 PM   #36
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The paws sure look lynxie.
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Old December 30, 2011, 08:47 PM   #37
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That's not really correct.

Puma, Mt Lion, Cougar, Florida Panther, Catamount, and Panther are all different names for the same species, Puma concolor.

Canadian Lynx (Lynx canadensis) and Bobcats (Lynx rufus) are distinct species, however they are both in the Lynx genus.
let me know the next time you go hands on with multiple of these. i have hand raised them, and i can say with all honestly. the are similar, they are NOT the same. there are ver certain differences. feel free to come over and i will intor duce you to two here at the house, and a few more that live down the street at my good friends house. i'm more than positive of what i say reguarding large cats. i dont think anyone on this entire board has the ability to challange my personal hands on experience. PERIOD
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Old December 30, 2011, 08:51 PM   #38
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Linx has big feet to help going through the snow ! It was a lynx !
One comment I saw was that a 30 lb lynx has bigger feet than a 200 lb mountain lion !!
a 30lbs lynx? that would be less then half grown. and as of yet, i have never met a 200 lbs cougar/mt lion etc. a typical on is 90 while a large one would be 120. i've never heard of one over 150.
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Old December 30, 2011, 09:03 PM   #39
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Vince, I don't think he was saying they were the same ......

Quote:
Canadian Lynx (Lynx canadensis) and Bobcats (Lynx rufus) are distinct species, however they are both in the Lynx genus.
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Old December 30, 2011, 09:12 PM   #40
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oh. my bad.
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Old December 30, 2011, 09:38 PM   #41
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I saw a post that said that bobcats and Canadian Lynxes were essentially the same species with only variations due to regional differences--like the regional subspecies variations in the single species, Puma concolor (cougar/mountain lion/Florida panther/puma/etc.)

I responded that they bobcat (Lynx rufus) and the Canadian Lynx (Lynx canadensis) are actually distinct (different) species, they are not the merely subspecies or regional variations. They are in the same genus, however.

Here's a factsheet on how to tell the difference between bobcats and lynxes.

http://www.vtfishandwildlife.com/lib...ke_of_lynx.pdf

As far as 30lbs being a half-grown Canadian Lynx, from everything I can find, the average size for adult males is pretty close to 30lbs--maybe even a little under that. It would seem that in the wild, anything over 40lbs is truly exceptional.

Maybe they get heavier in captivity.
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Old December 30, 2011, 10:01 PM   #42
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pick one up some time, it will be the heaviest 30 lbs you have ever lifted. i promise. canadians are probably a bit lighter then a siberian, but the are definatly well over 30 lbs. a coyote is 30 to 50 lbs, and they are much smaller
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Old December 31, 2011, 12:40 AM   #43
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Quote:
...canadians are probably a bit lighter then a siberian...
Based on what I can find, an adult Canadian Lynx is about half the weight of an adult Eurasian Lynx.
Quote:
...it will be the heaviest 30 lbs you have ever lifted.
Maybe they get heavier in captivity when they are fed regularly and don't have to run down their prey.
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Old December 31, 2011, 11:22 AM   #44
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Texas bobcats run 25 to 35 pounds; I've read that the more northern bobcats are heavier--which ties in with my previous comments in another thread about size differences between northern and southern critters of a species.

Siberian? A NatGeo program on Siberia claimed that the big male bears there could regularly go as much as a ton. I'd therefore not be surprised that other examples would show larger sizes than here in the US.
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Old December 31, 2011, 01:09 PM   #45
"JJ"
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Well I'm gonna throw in my $.02 here!!

As for the original post, Lynx all the way. I would guess it is one of this years juveniles.

BIGR SAID:
Quote:
While you guys are analyzing cats. Do think these pictures are of a Bobcat. I just recently got this one on the game cam.
I say bobcat all the way! The markings on the legs on the "BOBBED" spotted tail help me form my hypothesis!


As for Texas bobcats, 25-30lbs is not unheard of by any means, in NE Texas I think the average may be about 5 lbs lighter. I have seen pics of bobcats in the mid 30s from around here, but most of the ones I have seen are in the low to mid 20s. The local taxi I trade with mounted 54 bobcats from last Winter. I didn't see them all but got reports of the sizes and pics of the big ones. I watched as he and his apprentice mounted a few.

On to this size of a linx, I thinks it it depends on the location and the sub-species.

Part of an article on the subject:
Quote:
There are three different types of lynx with these being the North America lynx found in Canada and Alaska, the European lynx found in Spain and Portugal and the Asian lynx which is found in Turkestan and central Asia.

The North American lynx is the biggest species of lynx and some of these lynx individuals have extremely thick and fluffy looking fur which keeps the lynx warm in the freezing Canadian winter. The European and Asian lynx species are much smaller in size and have personalities that resemble those of a domestic cat, rather than a large feline.
Of course In North American we should just see the one species, but online research can give info on any of them. A mature lynx will USUALLY have almost a beard for the two tuffs of fur on the sides of its face growing together. The tuffs of fur on the ears are usually a bit more distinct the that on a bobcat. usually their tail will be solid with a darker tip. The majority of bobcats will have some spots on their tails and what appears to be a white tip. On closer inspection the white is on the underside of the tail but is usuall visible due to it being curled up.
Most information list a full grown North American lynx tom at 20-30 lbs, but they do get a LOT bigger!!

Here is a video of Loren Reese, an avid hunter/caller in Alaska who also make some great calls. This is a larger then average tom, but none the less BIG!
Big Lynx called in in Kenai, Alaska with Loren Reese of Reese Outdoors

It almost looks like the Grentch!!
Beautiful cat none the less!
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