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Old December 24, 2011, 12:44 PM   #1
Colokeb
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Paint on Glow?

Is there a paint on raidoactive sight product available to buy?
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Old December 24, 2011, 01:38 PM   #2
Old Grump
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Ready Set Glo, http://www.readysetglo.com/products/...--Powder-.html

It's a powder you add to your paint. I use Testors paint and add the powder for my fishing lures.
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Old December 24, 2011, 08:45 PM   #3
Dfariswheel
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These paints are not radioactive.
They don't generate their own light like Tritium sights do, and the old Radium paint as once used on watch dials is so hazardous you can't buy it.

These paints only glow after being "charged up" by exposing them to light.
That means that if you put the gun in a holster or drawer, when you take it out, it won't be glowing.
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Old December 26, 2011, 03:45 PM   #4
Old Grump
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Just guessing here but I suspect he meant luminous not radioactive.
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Old December 26, 2011, 05:53 PM   #5
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The tritium sights are both. The purpose of the tritium gas in the vials is the beta particle radiation it emits that strike a phosphor coating inside the glass vials and make it glow. Having a source of light fueled by a radioactive source is called radioluminescence. Beta radiation can only penetrate about a quarter inch air and can't penetrate skin, so is fairly safe as long as you don't inhale the tritium gas. Tritium has a half life of about a dozen years.

It was unsafe gamma radiation from radium that caused it to be a health hazard. Too bad. It takes about 25 years just to lose just 1% of its energy, IIRC.

As for the recommended paint additive, they claim you can see it for 24 hours, but don't say how dim it is by then. Whether or not it would be bright enough to use by the end of the night, I don't know. It's a common practice to hit watch dials with a flashlight to get them glowing. Might need to do the same with it on sights.
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Old December 26, 2011, 06:06 PM   #6
drail
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If it is so dark that you need to have your front sight glowing how can you possibly see your target and identify it?
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Old December 26, 2011, 07:57 PM   #7
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By the muzzle flashes.

Actually, there are lots of reduced light conditions where you can easily make out a target but not have enough contrast to pick up a front sight quickly. These sights are aimed at enhancing speed of sight acquisition under those marginal condition rather than to promote shooting into pitch blackness. That's why they need a certain amount of luminous intensity. In pitch black even a fairly dim glow would still be visible.
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Old December 27, 2011, 01:11 PM   #8
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Quote:
If it is so dark that you need to have your front sight glowing how can you possibly see your target and identify it?
This is the reason I finally had to break down and start mounting slopes on my hunting rifles and one of my shotguns. After 55, diabetes and cataracts I could still see the deer and squirrel in the dim light of an overcast winter day but could not see the sights anymore. That ended my pistol hunting for deer and small game except on exceptional well lit days.

Since then I have discovered paint and got some of my handgun shooting days back even though my eyes continue to drift south while I mosey on north. Hi Viz on two of my shotguns make a huge difference too, even on good light days. Most of the guns I shoot regularly are now painted.
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