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Old January 28, 2015, 12:44 PM   #1
Snookkrook
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45-70 Springfield

I enjoy restoring old firearms or firearms that people just dont care for. Reciently I had a friend that I work with bring me in a rifle she told me was her grandmothers. This friend herself is in her 60's. Anyhow, what she pulls out of her trunk is a Springfield 45-70 Trapdoor rifle 1881 US model 1873. I have informed her that she has a real great peice of American history here. I told her that I can not restore the weapon as I dont want to affect the value or history of the firearm. I will try to carefully clean the firearm with care, as I have read about curating care processes. I am looking for any info help that I can bring back to her with the gun once I am done. I will attach some pictures, any help is appreaciated.

SWP3.1.JPG

SWP4.1.JPG

SWP5.1.JPG
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Old January 28, 2015, 02:20 PM   #2
Dragonflydf
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Trapdoors are great rifles and are a joy to shoot as long as care is taken. When I cleaned mine, I took the rust off and went after the crud in the cracks and crevices, but I did not try to clean the wood.

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Old January 28, 2015, 06:53 PM   #3
SIGSHR
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Perhaps with more pictures we could know what you mean by "restore". Was it sporterized in some way ? Perhaps it is a Cadet rifle. Replacing anachronistic parts with period correct ones is one form of restoration and one that does not detract from value IMHO.
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Old January 28, 2015, 09:06 PM   #4
James K
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Those are reasonably good pictures, but we need overall pics of the gun, as well as pictures of the markings on the side of the stock, the lockplate, etc.

I will add my warning that more historic guns have been ruined beyond repair by attempts at "restoration" than were ever damaged in use "in the day."

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Old Yesterday, 01:52 PM   #5
Snookkrook
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As I stated, I am not going to restore, mearly clean. I do not want to hurt the value of the rifle. I am interested in how I may obtain any history of this particular rifle for the owner, if there is a way? I do have more pictures.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg SWP2.1.jpg (144.8 KB, 13 views)
File Type: jpg SWP10.1.jpg (136.7 KB, 12 views)
File Type: jpg SWP1.1.jpg (41.1 KB, 12 views)
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Old Yesterday, 03:51 PM   #6
Dragonflydf
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Depending on how far you take it down, if you want to remove the barrel and action, loosen the 2 large screws on the left side then tap them with a mallet to loosen the side plate. Do not attempt to take the main spring out unless you have a take down tool or main spring vise.

There is a great site on the Trapdoor you can go to and request a SRS check, you will need to give them the serial number.

http://trapdoorcollector.com/

Don't get your hopes up about being able to track your rifle to a specific place or time as records are very sparse.
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Old Yesterday, 05:57 PM   #7
SIGSHR
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Some full length pictures would help. In the ones you posted the wood looks very nice, the catrouches are sharp, the lockplate looks execellent.
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Old Yesterday, 08:45 PM   #8
James K
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That is a beautiful cartouche. I don't know what "SWP" stands for in your picture names, but in the cartouche it stands for Samuel W. Porter, Springfield Armory Master Armorer, whose stamp indicated that the rifle had passed its final inspection and had been accepted for service. Mr. Porter passed away on June 18, 1894, having lived to see his initials stamped on the first of the new Krag-Jorgensen rifles.

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Old Today, 09:44 AM   #9
Mike Irwin
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I woudln't really even clean it that much other than rubbing down with a good quality oil.

It appears to have a very good condition original finish, and the metal appears to be in excellent shape.

As such it likely has significant collector value, which could be badly damaged by overaggressive cleaning.
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