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Old November 1, 2011, 01:36 AM   #1
south.texas.dead.I
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Pro4 220v furnace wiring

I just got a 30A/50A plug that fits my dryer outlet I also got 10/2 wire 15ft the colors are grey white and bare. The colors from my pot are blue grey and green. I'm gonna connect them grey from pot to grey dryer wire. Blue from pot to white on dryer wire. And green to the bare for my ground. Can someone please double check this for me? Also how do you advise connecting these, soldering?


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Old November 1, 2011, 06:46 AM   #2
darkroommike
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220v wiring

Surely there are some electricians on this board but that doesn't sound right. 220v typically has two "hot" wires, a "neutral" and a ground, you can buy a pre-wired plug to fit your dryer that will use braided copper (superior to solid for this application) or use 10/3.

You do not want to solder connections in this case, solder has a lower melting point than lead! You need to make solid mechanical connections at the pot.

If you do not have an instruction sheet for this pot have an electrician do it, hopefully one that is a shooting buddy and will trade his time for boolits.

Last edited by darkroommike; November 1, 2011 at 06:51 AM. Reason: expansion of post
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Old November 1, 2011, 07:02 AM   #3
jaguarxk120
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Time to go back to who made the "pot". The mfgr should have a wiring diagram for wiring the pot.
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Old November 1, 2011, 07:46 AM   #4
south.texas.dead.I
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Ya...the pot has two hots and a ground for sure. The previous setup I had also two hots and a ground. But it also had a white for neutral that I just taped off


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Old November 1, 2011, 08:44 AM   #5
wcar
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A dryer typically uses a 30 amp. 220 volt circuit. If the connector is a three bladed connector there is a red wire, a black wire and a white wire. The red and black wires are the hot wires and the white wire is the neutral. The 'L' shaped blade is the neutral. If the connector is a four-bladed connector there is a red wire, a black wire, a white wire and a green wire. The 'L' shape blade is the white wire and the 'U' shaped blade is the green wire. The white wire is neutral and the green wire is chassis ground to the appliance. In most residential situations the white wire and the green wire are both connected to the neutral-ground buss at the breaker box. Electrically there isn't any difference between the black wire and the red one. They both measure 110V to ground and 220v between the two. The white wire (and green wire, if there is one) must be connected both for proper operation and to avoid a 'hot chassis' situation. Mechanical connections (wire nuts or screw terminals) should be used. And in real life 110V is actually 120 V and 220V is actually 240V. Be careful! 220 is a bitch.
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Old November 1, 2011, 09:12 AM   #6
Doyle
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Quote:
220v typically has two "hot" wires, a "neutral" and a ground
No, most 220v outlets don't have a neutral. The neutral is only needed if a particular appliance also needs to pull 110 from the same outlet (i.e. the dryer timer or the clock on a stove). Standard 220v is two hots and a bare ground.
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Old November 1, 2011, 09:25 AM   #7
south.texas.dead.I
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doyle View Post
No, most 220v outlets don't have a neutral. The neutral is only needed if a particular appliance also needs to pull 110 from the same outlet (i.e. the dryer timer or the clock on a stove). Standard 220v is two hots and a bare ground.
This is my situation I have a white grey and a bare for the ground which is weird cause according to the color code the white would be a neutral but the guy I talked to about this said my three pot wires blue grey and green match the white grey and bare for grounding on the dryer wire. Now since I'm not using a neutral would it be better to just not have a pin in the connector?


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Old November 1, 2011, 11:20 AM   #8
Doyle
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If you aren't using the neutral, just leave it unconnected. Take one of those little circuit testers (the kind with two wires and a little light diode) and connect one end to what you think is a hot wire in your outlet and the other end to the bare (ground) wire in the outlet. If the wire really is hot, then it will light up. Do the same with the other wire you suspect is hot. When you have confirmed that they are both hot, wire them to the blue and grey wires on your pot. Connect the pot ground to the bare ground wire in your outlet and you'll be good to go.
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Old November 10, 2011, 12:38 PM   #9
south.texas.dead.I
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For everything working good thanks for all the help guys


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Old November 15, 2011, 05:58 PM   #10
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To further complicate matters, a LOT of houses connect the ground wire to the neutral buss... usually a copper strip with all the grounds and white wires connected to it. This makes "neutral" and "ground" common to each other.
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Old November 15, 2011, 08:18 PM   #11
Doyle
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To further complicate matters, a LOT of houses connect the ground wire to the neutral buss... usually a copper strip with all the grounds and white wires connected to it. This makes "neutral" and "ground" common to each other.
It has been a while since I've seen the NEC, but if I recall correctly code calls for the neutral and ground to always be connected - but only at one spot (the buss bar).
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