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Old November 19, 2011, 12:20 PM   #26
Hawg Haggen
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I thot we were talking about the 60.
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Old November 19, 2011, 01:24 PM   #27
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Hawg

I think you were and I think I should have been.
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My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government. Thomas Jefferson
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Old November 19, 2011, 03:23 PM   #28
Hawg Haggen
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Most clones except for the newer Pietta Remingtons use the same sight configuration as the originals. My 51 hits point of aim, at least up to 25 yards.
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Old November 21, 2011, 04:09 PM   #29
bprevolver
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Dixie Gun Works 1860 Army is NOT a Navy Arms

What Dixie Gun Works is advertising as a "Navy Arms" 1860 Army is a regular Pietta. Navy Arms has not imported any percussion revolvers since 2002. The last marking found on a Navy Arms percussion revolver import is, FRONTIERSMAN NAVY ARMS COMPANY, UNION CITY, NJ. This marking is extremely rare and only used less that a year.
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Old November 21, 2011, 07:51 PM   #30
Model-P
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Quote:
Then why is it documented that small arms fire started several woods fires during the Civil War?
I wonder who sat around determining the source of the fires while battle was being waged around the observer. There's a heck of a lot going on in a battle, including artillery.

Nonetheless, I thought we were talking about a fire being started in one's home. The more easily ignitable a substance, the shorter a sustained flame needs to be to start combustion. Dry grass is wonderfully easy to ignite. Add a full charge from a rifle while lying in grass, and I don't doubt fires were started by "small arms". I'm having trouble thinking of anything in a hallway or living room that is nearly as flammable as dry grass though.
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Old November 21, 2011, 08:44 PM   #31
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In today's homes, the emphasis on product safety and flammability has pretty much reduced if not fully eliminated the likelihood that a bp gun discharge would start a fire. In my grandmother's home, however....
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Old November 22, 2011, 02:22 AM   #32
Doc Hoy
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How about today?

There are plenty of re-enactments these days during which a line of infantry fires multiple volleys. Plenty of CAS events during which a lot of shooting goes on.

For those events which happen to be held in an area where there might be dry grass just in front of the line, does anyone know of any any reports of fires started just in front of a line of infantry or in front of an artillery piece?

Do reenactors get the encouragement to check the area in front of a line to make sure nothing is amiss?

How about fire prevention rules at CAS events? Safety rules are written in blood. If there are rules about fire prevention, they came to be written because someone had a problem with it or at least thought they might have a problem with it.

I don't have a feeling one way or another nor have I had any experience with CAS or reenactments. Just wondering.
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My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government. Thomas Jefferson
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Old November 22, 2011, 06:12 AM   #33
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I have personally set the dry grass in front of our covered 100 yard range on fire with the patch from a long rifle while working up a load. If you're using the right load your patches won't be smoldering after leaving the barrel, but I have had it happen (very rarely) when using a heavy load (meaning overloaded, beyond the sweet spot) and a tight ball/patch combination.

I have also seen a sandbag smolder after a revolver was fired with the barrel resting on the bag; I suggested a different technique for using a pistol rest to the shooter.
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Old November 22, 2011, 06:28 AM   #34
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At last...

...Some hard and current evidence.
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