The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > The Harley Nolden Memorial Institute for Firearms Research

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old November 25, 2011, 10:27 PM   #1
vmiguard
Junior Member
 
Join Date: November 25, 2011
Posts: 4
My father's S&W 22LR revolver

I was wondering if someone could help me with a firearm identification problem:

I inherited a Smith and Wesson 22 Long Rifle CTG. It is a 6-shot double action revolver with a 6 inch barrel. It is a black metal gun with wooden handles with a diamond cutout in the center (around a screw). The rear sight is adjustable.

On the base of the handle there is what I believe to be a serial number: K 325XXX

When I open the cylinder there is a "Y", "3", "3", and another character which looks like a "9" inside a circle stamped from top to bottom. They are definitely vertical, but they are not lined up. On the swing out arm itself is stamped what appears to be the number "53518" or "S3518" and the letters "DG". Based on comments to jbwalther in: http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=322815, I am assuming the gun was manufactured before 1957 (possibly 1955). Because it was suggested that guns of that age needed specific descriptions or photos, I have attached a photo of the gun (below).

There is a narrow rib, which is grooved, on the top of the gun which runs the length of the barrel. This grooved pattern is continued on both the back and front of the metal portion of the grip. The blade which comprises the front sight is squared off at the rear of the blade.The logo is on the right side of the frame and is about the size of a nickel (at least including the banners with the words "Trade" and "Mark" at the top and the bottom of the logo circle. There is a screw just below the rear sight as well as on the front of the trigger guard. The cylinder is 1 5/8 in length.

Any help you could give me would be greatly appreciated!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg SW22LRCTG.jpg (265.4 KB, 70 views)
vmiguard is offline  
Old November 25, 2011, 11:30 PM   #2
30-30remchester
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 18, 2009
Location: mountains of colorado
Posts: 977
Your gun is a K-22. In 1957 Smith & Wesson gave their guns model numbers and they asigned this particular gun as a model 17.
30-30remchester is offline  
Old November 26, 2011, 06:15 AM   #3
gyvel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 30, 2009
Location: Northern AZ
Posts: 5,229
Bit of info from Supica's book: According to his listings, your gun was (supposedly) made in 1958 (K317823-K350547.) He also states that model numbering began in 1957, so, according to his data, your gun is a Model 17.
gyvel is offline  
Old November 26, 2011, 10:29 AM   #4
PetahW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 19, 2008
Posts: 4,679
FWIW, AFAIK the K-22/M-17 was S&W's premier target revolver of the time.

It would be most accurate if shot single-action, manually thumb-cocking the hammer for each shot, using target-grade ammo.

.
PetahW is offline  
Old November 26, 2011, 11:47 AM   #5
vmiguard
Junior Member
 
Join Date: November 25, 2011
Posts: 4
Wow! Thank you very much 30-30remchester, gyvel, and PetahW. I really appreciate the information.

Is it likely that S&W manufactured my gun in 1958 and had already named it the M-17, but did not stamp a model number in it anywhere? Based on the information in the prior thread I mentioned, I assumed it was made before 1957. Either way, I am glad I have the information you have provided. It is nice to know something about the gun.

PetahW, you are right. I took it to a range yesterday and shot 20 or so rounds through it. It was lots of fun! It's a good gun.
vmiguard is offline  
Old November 26, 2011, 06:37 PM   #6
PetahW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 19, 2008
Posts: 4,679
IIRC, the frame, inside the crane (open the cylinder to observe), should be stamped: "MOD 17".

.
PetahW is offline  
Old November 26, 2011, 06:44 PM   #7
vmiguard
Junior Member
 
Join Date: November 25, 2011
Posts: 4
Nope, when I open the cylinder there is a "Y", "3", "3", and another character which looks like a "9" inside a circle stamped from top to bottom. They are definitely vertical, but they are not lined up. On the swing out arm itself is stamped what appears to be the number "53518" or "S3518" and the letters "DG". There is definitely not a Mod 17 or even a K-22 stamped there.

But, from reading some of the other threads, it appears this was not necessarily unusual during that time frame.

Thanks very much!
vmiguard is offline  
Old November 26, 2011, 08:16 PM   #8
RJay
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 2, 2005
Location: Arizona
Posts: 1,665
as you have already found out, it was not unusual for guns built in 1958 to not have the Model number under the crane.
__________________
Ron James
RJay is offline  
Old November 27, 2011, 05:11 PM   #9
Winchester_73
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 20, 2008
Location: Pittsburgh PA
Posts: 2,859
So the gun is officially a model K-22 target masterpiece. Its not a model 17, and its also a 4 screw, FWIW. A nice gun.
__________________
Winchester 73, the TFL user that won the west
Winchester_73 is offline  
Old November 27, 2011, 06:25 PM   #10
salvadore
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 1, 2007
Location: Idaho
Posts: 1,864
Quote:
It would be most accurate if shot single-action, manually thumb-cocking the hammer for each shot, using target-grade ammo.
I've never been able to shoot my M-17 as accurately single action as I do double action. I believe that is because it has an excellent D/A trigger and a shorter lock time.
salvadore is offline  
Old November 27, 2011, 06:34 PM   #11
vmiguard
Junior Member
 
Join Date: November 25, 2011
Posts: 4
What is the 4 screw thing about? Is it significant that it is the 4 screw model? Is the difference that there are screws adjusting the sights? What is the alternative (i.e., how many screws is the other model)?
vmiguard is offline  
Old November 27, 2011, 07:33 PM   #12
30-30remchester
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 18, 2009
Location: mountains of colorado
Posts: 977
Ok here goes. Smith & Wesson started out with 4 sideplate screws and one trigger guard screw. When Smith stopped using the top sideplate screw they retained the triggerguard screw for a couple years. They soon redesigned the internal works and eliminated the triggerguard screw thus resulting in the standard 3 screw design we see today. When the grips are removed you should only see 3 screws connecting the sideplate to the frame. Look in front of the triggerguard and you should see the 4th screw.
30-30remchester is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.09004 seconds with 10 queries