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Old November 4, 2011, 11:29 PM   #1
TripHlx
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Join Date: October 10, 2011
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Equipment/Component Exposure

Hi guys! I have a quick (and probably repetitive) question. I'm currently building a reloading bench, buying all of my equipment for reloading/casting, and hopefully will be set up soon. My question is about the area I'm setting up in. I'm putting everything in a small (approx 10X10) outdoor storage building I built about two years ago that never got used for anything. The building is built solid as a rock, has two gas-filled locking windows, a steel door and solid locks. I think I'm ok to go on security. The thing I'm mostly worried about is exposure of gear and components to temp/humidity variables. The building is fully insulated, top bottom and walls. So far is also waterproof, despite some hellacious storms in the last two years. I live in SC, about an hour south of the NC/SC border. Should I be worried about how the weather and whatnot will affect my gear, or do you think I'm ok as it is? If not, what steps do you suggest I take to keep everything in top shape and extend component shelf life? Thanks again guys!
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Old November 4, 2011, 11:50 PM   #2
Sevens
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I am not sure what effect the environment will have on components. But one easy "fix" would be two large rubbermaid-type totes. Put your powder in one, primers in another and leave them in the house... take 'em out when it's time to work at the load bench.
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Old November 5, 2011, 12:22 AM   #3
Jim243
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First concern would be the concrete pad that the building stands on. Rather than have the floor sweat duing the summer and winter months I would seal the floor. They have an appoxy that is used for garage floors that looks nice and does a good job of sealing the concrete.

Second would be air-conditioning during the summer. Moisture will be your biggest problem so a dehumidifer of proper size would be a benefit as well. Next would be lightiing, put some good floresents overhead to give you plenty of light.


Good luck on your project.
Jim
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Last edited by Jim243; November 5, 2011 at 12:33 AM.
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Old November 5, 2011, 12:40 AM   #4
Indi
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LOL.... I asked a similar question. Just wasent as well stated. Good job.
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Old November 5, 2011, 12:57 AM   #5
TripHlx
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Thanks for the replies so far guys! I really appreciate it. For your knowledge, the building isn't actually on a concrete pad, its all treated lumber, reinforced (could easily park a multi-ton vehicle on it without any damage), and is sitting atop a moisture barrier. This was done so that when I eventually move from this duplex apartment, I can simply rent a truck and haul it away to my new home. I'm planning on using a window unit for a/c during the summer, and a flameless space heater with no exposed hot surfaces during the winter. I had considered a de-humidifier as well, after all, they're dirt cheap. Any other advice and concerns is welcome! Thanks again guys!
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Old November 5, 2011, 02:51 AM   #6
noylj
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You will want AC and heat for year-round use.
I like to keep the messy jobs (casting, cleaning cases and guns, etc.) in the garage or out building.
I like to do the clean jobs (almost all reloading), in the house.
As for a bench, they are never long enough.
As for cabinets, you never have enough storage.
Most presses and dies can rust pretty fast, particularly in hot/humid areas. Dies I keep in drawers with VCI paper.
If you mount the press(es) with wing nuts, you can remove the press(es) and store them in a safe with a heater/light to prevent rust.
Do not store powder or primers in a safe.
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