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Old October 28, 2011, 05:04 PM   #26
dmazur
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Big thing is that you can't be distracted for any reason, else you'll lose track of whether or not you've already charged the case.
When running a 550B, your left hand indexes, then places a bullet on the case in Station 3. Your right hand places a new case in Station 1.

If you've already seated a bullet and haven't indexed, you'll find a seated bullet at Station 3 and a resized case at Station 1. So index and proceed. Case at Station 2 gets one powder charge.

However, in the desire to move quickly, I'm sure confusion is possible and then you most certainly can pull the handle twice, seating an already seated bullet and resizing/repriming an already resized case. Now you've charged the case at Station 2 twice.

I've read of an excellent practice for 550B owners: If you are interrupted, leave the handle down. That way, when you return, you know you are mid stroke without examining cases. Pull the handle up, push back for primer seating, index and continue.

Avoiding interruptions, having a strong light aimed at Station 2, and paying attention to what you're doing are the important things. But, if you are interrupted, leave the handle down.
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Old October 29, 2011, 06:15 AM   #27
Kevin Rohrer
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This question has been repeated by many others just wanting to get into reloading. The correct answer is to start slow w/ a single-stage press and after a couple years of experience, move up to a progressive. Single-stages are much more forgiving of mistakes than progressives.
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Old October 29, 2011, 03:00 PM   #28
Beanie-Bean
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Beanie - nice lamp fix. Do you know if the Hornady makes this process easier?
Well, Hornady press I have is the single-stage press, so I don't really use a light to check the powder charge, since it is managed by this guy, the RCBS ChargeMaster:



The resized/primed/flared cases are put on the loading block, and the RCBS dispenser does all the measuring, so I just dump the powder into each case.
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Old October 29, 2011, 08:03 PM   #29
clocktime
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Red or Blue?

I had a LNL and liked how the press felt and caliber changes were a snap. But there were lots of problems with high primers and primers that didn't go in straight (inserted at an angle). None of the suggested fixes worked. I found out that Win SR in 223 Rem and meticulous primer pocket prep helped, but didn't always work. Finally, after a couple AR-15 slam fires, I had to just hand prime. In addition, I could never load Sierra 80 loads that had less than .005" runout. I shoot across the course with the AR and you nust need to have a good finish at 600 to do any good. I believe run out kills accuracy at 600. I called and called Hornady, and none of their suggestions worked. What was worse is the primer ram was wearing a divot in the frame. I fixed that with a glued on piece of hacksaw blade. So, after endless hours of frustration, I sold the thing.

Then I got a XL-650 with a casefeeder and haven't looked back. I still use the Hornady powder measure and a case activated powder measure adapter thing.

If you load pistol and want to fool around with different brands of primers, go for the LNL. My XL-650 is kind of tempermental with primer brands, but at least, I can prime with it.

Best of luck.

Mike
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Old October 29, 2011, 08:04 PM   #30
clocktime
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Join Date: November 13, 2009
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Red or Blue?

I had a LNL and liked how the press felt and caliber changes were a snap. But there were lots of problems with high primers and primers that didn't go in straight (inserted at an angle). None of the suggested fixes worked. I found out that Win SR in 223 Rem and meticulous primer pocket prep helped, but didn't always work. Finally, after a couple AR-15 slam fires, I had to just prime by hand. In addition, I could never load Sierra 80 loads that had less than .005" runout. I shoot across the course with the AR and you nust need to have a good finish at 600 to do any good. I believe run out kills accuracy at 600. I called and called Hornady, and none of their suggestions worked. What was worse is the primer ram was wearing a divot in the frame. I fixed that with a glued on piece of hacksaw blade. So, after endless hours of frustration, I sold the thing.

Then I got a XL-650 with a casefeeder and haven't looked back. I still use the Hornady powder measure and a case activated powder measure adapter thing.

If you load pistol and want to fool around with different brands of primers, go for the LNL. My XL-650 is kind of tempermental with primer brands, but at least, I can prime with it.

Best of luck.

Mike
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