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Old October 11, 2011, 01:46 PM   #1
Jbotto
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Die ring set screws

I bought a set of Forster die rings, and was disappointed from the start with the cheap screws. I kind of figured this when I purchased them, but when I was reading the reviews, a person mentioned he replaced them with a good stainless 6-32x5/8" hex head screw. I went to the two small hardware stores in town here, and couldn't even order them from them. Anyone have a good source for them?

Thanks in advance for the help!

-Jbotto
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Old October 11, 2011, 04:43 PM   #2
Unclenick
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McMaster-Carr. Assuming it's a socket head cap screw, it is part number 92185A149. $3.30 for box of 25. The S&H will be more than the screws, I expect, so you may want to find other odds and ends to buy.

I was disappointed when Forster went from steel to aluminum, but maybe I'm giving away my age.
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Old October 11, 2011, 05:13 PM   #3
Jbotto
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Unclenick, Thanks very much! Have you ordered these, or are you being awesomely helpful?
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Old October 11, 2011, 05:37 PM   #4
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Fastenal and auto parts stores that do machine work will probably have them as well
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Old October 11, 2011, 06:05 PM   #5
mehavey
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FWIW: After getting tired of bunging up the threads with normal "locking" screws that screw directly into the die body, I just went out and bought a dozen Hornady rings that constrict the ring, not ding up into the threads. I then replace the original rings whenever I have to readjust a die body setting.

http://www.amazon.com/Hornady-Sure-L.../dp/B000LC116Y

(Or are you now going to tell me they're all made by the same people as Forster's ?)


.

Last edited by mehavey; October 11, 2011 at 06:32 PM.
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Old October 11, 2011, 06:34 PM   #6
Jbotto
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Mehavey, the Forster die rings are similar in that they don't really have a set screw but rather a locking screw.
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Old October 11, 2011, 07:24 PM   #7
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I realized that, and then worried that they were all made by the same manufacturer regardless of brand.
So far Hornady's rings (and screws) have served me well. (knock on wood)
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Old October 11, 2011, 07:30 PM   #8
NESHOOTER
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Setscrews

Ace hardware, should have them as well but, I was also unhappy with RCBS set screws so I also put on Hornady die lock rings.
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Old October 11, 2011, 07:38 PM   #9
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I made a bunch of stainless ones, like hornady's, on the cnc at work.
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Old October 11, 2011, 08:16 PM   #10
David Bachelder
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RCBS set screws:
I heard a good fix was to put a peice of lead shot between the end of the set screw and the die threads.

I'm going to have to try it one day.
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Old October 12, 2011, 01:09 AM   #11
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+1 on the Hornady rings. Looks like they are the same design as the Forster (cross bolt), but they use an allen screw.
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Old October 12, 2011, 11:44 AM   #12
serf 'rett
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Hornaday rings replaced my RCBS rings
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Old October 12, 2011, 12:33 PM   #13
mkl
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Quote:
RCBS set screws:
I heard a good fix was to put a peice of lead shot between the end of the set screw and the die threads.
My older RCBS dies came with the lead shot under the set screw. After the die is removed from the press, the lock ring is still fairly tight on the die. The trick to loosing the lock ring after the screw is backed off is to give the lock ring a firm tap with a plastic hammer.
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Old October 12, 2011, 01:02 PM   #14
Jbotto
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See, I use a Co-ax, so I like the perfectly round Forster's with the crossbolt as compared to the Hornady's. I like a round ring to slip right in to the Co-ax's die ring slot.
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Old October 12, 2011, 01:25 PM   #15
mehavey
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I could swear the dozen I got were round (but senior monents do catch up with me)
so quite possibly I got them from Sinclair.
http://www.sinclairintl.com/.aspx/pi...ock-Rings-3pk-

Last edited by mehavey; October 12, 2011 at 01:34 PM.
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Old October 12, 2011, 01:39 PM   #16
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The hornady are round also, but they have wrench flats and are the cats meow.
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Old October 12, 2011, 01:42 PM   #17
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Yeah, the wrench flats. I just wanted the full round ones. Personal choice is the only reason I went with the Forster.
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Old October 12, 2011, 01:48 PM   #18
serf 'rett
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Appears you are back to the option of - must order a bag of allen head (socket) screws. You've got good rings, just need the hardened screws to make them "work." Take care not to strip the interior of the screw, cause if you do, you will not like trying to remove the stripped allen head screw.
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Last edited by serf 'rett; October 12, 2011 at 01:53 PM.
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Old October 12, 2011, 03:41 PM   #19
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Quote:
just need the hardened screws to make them "work."
And thus screw up the die threads.

Either clamp type rings or a piece of 7 1/2 shot under the set screw work fine.
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Old October 12, 2011, 04:39 PM   #20
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My Redding’s come with brass screws. I don’t think that I would want a “good” screw due to the fact that if the screws are made of a very hard material they can damage the threading of the die.
Since many of my dies are used on different length cases like 44 and 38 and .223 (with or without crimp) I change the depth a lot. It takes little time to set them each time with a good gage.
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Old October 12, 2011, 09:55 PM   #21
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Sorry for suggesting another brand. You obviously have the rings you like (and they look like good ones), you just want better screws. Good luck.
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Old October 12, 2011, 10:06 PM   #22
Jbotto
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Thank you all for the suggestions of the lead shot and the softer screws. However the forster die rings are not the time with that kind of holding screw. They have a crossbolt screw, and it is was my fault for putting up the words "set screw" in the title as opposed to the crossbolt screw design. I have tried other rings that came with other dies I own and some are too wide to even fit in the Co-ax's slot. I did some research from Midway's customer reviews and came to the conclusion of going with the Forster's. I mean, they are made by the same company as the press after all. I guess I will just have to get the bag of them and be happy with that. Thank you to all who helped me out! It's much appreciated! Thanks for understanding Duke City Six! lol
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Old October 12, 2011, 10:14 PM   #23
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I know you guys don't like the Lee stuff, but their locking rings just use a rubber O ring underneath the locking ring and finger tightning is all it takes to lock the die in place, have had no slipage or problems with them in the past 7 years as to comming lose.

Jim


http://leeprecision.com/xcart/7-8-14...CK-RING-3.html
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Old October 12, 2011, 10:29 PM   #24
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Quote:
I know you guys don't like the Lee stuff, but their locking rings just use a rubber O ring underneath the locking ring and finger tightning is all it takes to lock the die in place, have had no slipage or problems with them in the past 7 years as to comming lose.
How do you remove those from the press without loosing your adjustment, though? That's the benefit of the locking rings that are being discussed here. I use mostly Lee dies and use the rings you're talking about for anything that's going to stay in a turret, but anything that needs to be switched around gets the Hornady rings.
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Old October 12, 2011, 10:32 PM   #25
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Hello, guys, back in the 70's, when I started metallic reloading, I always bought RCBS dies. The locking rings were of the set-screw type. There was always a lead shot under the setscrew. To adjust, a light tap with a rawhide or plastic mallet on the slightly loosened screw would always loosen rings.
In the 90's, the change to the split rings started..I actually prefer the set-screw..when tightening the split ringe, there is always a slight movement of the adjustment caused by the ring and die threads being torqued together.
Also about this time..the set screws were being made of brass..brass can and does deform threads..I wonder why they did this? Economy?
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