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Old September 30, 2011, 09:10 AM   #1
Donna1
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AIRWEIGHT 38 SPL. CTG Model 37

Can someone help me.

This is the first gun I bought. Could you tell me about this revolver.

The serial number J9740xx.

I would also like to know what type of ammo to buy?

Any info would help me,

Thanks

Donna
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Old September 30, 2011, 10:27 AM   #2
lee n. field
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.38 Special. Available pretty much everywhere.

What I'm seeing right now isn't telling me if it's OK to shoot .38 Special +P in it.

You might want to peruse this: the Snubnose Files.
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Old September 30, 2011, 10:50 AM   #3
Yankee Doodle
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Carried a 37 for years. First as an off duty gun, then as my duty revolver. When I retired, I gave it to my son. Worst mistake I ever made. I can't convince him to give it back. Bought a 642 as a replacement.
Back to the 37. Never had any problem with the piece at all. Worked perfectly from the day I got it, and still works perfectly today.
As for ammo: According to S&W, it is NOT rated for +P ammo. That being said, it was always carried with the FBI load in it, And is now carried with the Speer 135 +P SB load. However, except for periodically firing a few rounds to check functioning and POI, it has always been fired with standard velocity loads. I am not confident that it will take a steady diet of +P rounds.
So, if you wish to take the chance, my experience shows that it will handle +P loads, shot occasionaly, just fine.
However, you do this at your own risk, and I cannot advise you to do so.
Besides, I am not too sure that there is all that much of a difference, as long as the shots are properly placed. There are some good standard velocity rounds available should you decide to play it safe. (Smart)
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Old September 30, 2011, 11:27 AM   #4
Shadi Khalil
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That's a great little revolver you got there. You want to only fire .38 special ammo out of it. Whether or not you want to carry +P (higher pressure rounds = more felt recoil, muzzle rise and wear on gun) is entirely up to you. If it were my 37, I'd follow the manufactures suggestions. There are plenty of standard pressure rounds that I feel perfectly comfortable carrying in my 637. Hornady and Federal JHP have some good standard pressure stuff.
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Old September 30, 2011, 01:52 PM   #5
mkk41
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I've owned 2 Model 37s , one is now owned and carried by my ex-G/F , a nurse. Yes , stick with standard velocity .38s for practice , but for carry , and occasional use +Ps will not harm it. Mine gets loaded with Glasers , which are +P rated. Federal has reintroduced the std.pressure 125gr Nyclad HP , a great SD round in snubbys.

There has never been AFAIK , a catastrophic failure of a Mod.37.

Remember , +P means it is loaded to higher pressure than industry standard , yet still below industry maximum pressures for .38 Special. SAAMI industry .38 Special standard pressure is kept very low because of the many old and low quality revolvers out there.

Last edited by mkk41; September 30, 2011 at 02:02 PM.
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Old September 30, 2011, 02:49 PM   #6
laytonj1
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Quote:
The serial number J9740xx
J9740XX = 1982.

Jim
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Old September 30, 2011, 06:31 PM   #7
Kreyzhorse
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As pointed out, it fires .38 Special ammo. I'd stay away from .38 Special +P.

Overall, you bought a great gun. I might suggest getting some formal training too. The NRA or your local gun shop might be able to turn you on to an instructor.
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Old September 30, 2011, 06:44 PM   #8
Webleymkv
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S&W did not rate any J-Frames of that vintage for +P ammunition (the cutoff was 1999 IIRC). While firing a limited amount in an all-steel gun like an M36 probably wouldn't hurt it, I would be much more hesitant to do so in an aluminum-frame revolver like your M37.

Quote:
Remember , +P means it is loaded to higher pressure than industry standard , yet still below industry maximum pressures for .38 Special. SAAMI industry .38 Special standard pressure is kept very low because of the many old and low quality revolvers out there.
That is not correct. +P ammo, by SAAMI's definition, may be loaded up to 10% over maximum standard pressure. The only "industry standard" ammunition loaded above +P is +P+, which can be loaded however the manufacturer sees fit since that is not a SAAMI recognized designation, and proof loadings which are typically in the neighborhood of 50% over maximum standard pressure.
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Old September 30, 2011, 09:53 PM   #9
Jeremiah/Az
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If you are a new shooter, you might want to shoot lead semi wad cutters. That is a light target load that will have less recoil. I reload them for my girlfriend, who is a new shooter, but you can buy them new too.
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Old September 30, 2011, 10:59 PM   #10
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I would second the advice of several to practice with and carry (for now) good quality standard pressure rounds. If this is your first gun you bought, Donna, plus P rounds will likely kick more than you might find comfortable in the beginning. Like you, the first handgun I ever bought (some time ago now) was an airweight J-frame. Nevertheless, an airweight J-frame is seldom considered to be a beginner's gun because the combination of a stiff load and a very lightweight gun produces, you guessed it, vigorous recoil. Not to scare you, you'll be fine and acclimate quickly, but there are some very good loads that are standard pressure and/or having light weight bullets that will afford you a good level of protection. not recoil excessively, and will likely make it easier for you to shoot the weapon more accurately. My favorite is the Federal 125 grain Nyclad, but Federal also makes a 110 grain personal defense, Winchester makes a 110 grain Silvertip, Hornady makes several standard pressure loads and I'm sure there are others. For the sake of your shooting pleasure and effectiveness and for the long term well being of the revolver, I would recommend sticking with standard pressure loads. For me, I have a goodly supply of Nyclads for my 37 and I call it good.
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Old October 5, 2011, 09:22 AM   #11
jrothWA
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For the M37 S&W, expect...

snappy recoil with standard loads.

Will have to aim lower as to get hit on paper centered.

Presently using Hornady 140gr XTP .38Spl and will switch over to the 125 gr XTP for carry.

Also using the GI hardball 130gr FMJ for practice.

No need for +P ammo.
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Old October 5, 2011, 10:50 AM   #12
Walklightly
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Quote:
AIRWEIGHT 38 SPL. CTG Model 37

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Can someone help me.

This is the first gun I bought. Could you tell me about this revolver.

The serial number J9740xx.

I would also like to know what type of ammo to buy?

Any info would help me,

Thanks

Donna
No mentioning about +P
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Old October 5, 2011, 04:05 PM   #13
Webleymkv
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Originally posted by Walklightly
Quote:
No mentioning about +P
Well, the OP did ask the following:

Originally posted by Donna1
Quote:
I would also like to know what type of ammo to buy?

Any info would help me,
Since, from the title of the thread, the OP obviously knows that the revolver is chambered for .38 Special and because +P is a type of .38 Special ammunition, I think it's quite pertinent to the information that was requested as to whether or not the revolver can fire +P ammo.
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Old October 6, 2011, 03:50 AM   #14
Walklightly
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Ok, no +Ps?

I have a 37, don't shoot +Ps, never well, and I don't feel the need.

In fact, it's loaded with a 147g wadcutter first shot, and the rest are 158g SJHPs.

Best $150 I ever spent. It looks a little beat up, but that just gives it charm.
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Old October 6, 2011, 08:24 AM   #15
Laz
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Completely aside from whether or not one should fire plus P ammo in a Model 37 is the fact that the OP said this is her first gun and people are simply suggesting she might have a more harmonious outcome by utilizing standard pressure ammo in a gun weighing something under 15 ounces. It ain't rocket science.
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Old October 7, 2011, 08:48 AM   #16
jrothWA
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Recommend you try...

Pachmyar "gripper" grips instead of the wood grips (if still on revolver), as these Pachmyar are longer for and aft direction and narrower in width, Will allow a better grip and reduce the felt recoil.

Ask more questions Doona. Also go to PAX's website the: www.corneredcat.com

VERY helpful info.

If you hvaen't shoot before, get a tube a tennis balls and use one to build up hand and wrist muscles.

Use thumb and all finger then thumb and single fingers to help hold and control the revolver.
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Old October 7, 2011, 09:00 AM   #17
MLeake
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Perceived recoil in a J-frame...

... can be lessened quite a bit by getting a set of grips that fit your hand well.

Some aftermarket grips cover the backstrap, but most don't. Advantages to covering the backstrap are a bigger grip (good for long fingered types, like me), and possibility of some cushioning material. Disadvantages to covering the backstrap are a bigger grip (may cause excessive double action trigger reach for shorter fingered types) and a bit tougher pocket carry due to bigger grip.

As far as reach goes, you want to be able to get the first joint of your index finger on the trigger, while keeping the backstrap of the gun in the web of your hand, between thumb and index finger, so that the barrel is aligned with the long bones of your forearm. Too long a reach will force you to rotate your grip around the gun, possibly aligning it into the drumstick of the thumb, which will greatly reduce recoil control and increase perceived recoil and pain.

Some aftermarket grips are boot type, so they stop, vertically, at the base of the metal of the grip-frame. Most of us have our little fingers dangling under the boot grip. Boot grips are easier to conceal, but the little finger has a lot to do with controlling muzzle rise. Slightly longer grips, that allow the little finger a good resting place, are better for controlling muzzle rise, but harder to conceal.

Rubber grips, such as Pachmayr and Hogue, offer more cushioning, but also have more of a tendency to grab cover garment fabric and reveal the gun. (Pachmayr is typically less grabby than Hogue, but YMMV.)

Wood grips don't grab fabric so much, but can beat up your hand a bit more.

Personally, I like wood, and have checkered, oversized (covered backstrap), finger-grooved Altamonts on my 442. I typically shoot 50-100 rounds at a session, with no pain or blisters. Again, YMMV.

Edit: Note that I also lift weights, do a lot of pull-ups, and use grip strengtheners from Captains of Crush.... However, my friend's wife shot the 442 last month, and had no trouble with it, and she's a little thing. OTOH, my wife is a farmgirl and former pro horse breeder/trainer, and is used to tossing hay bales around, but she does NOT like the 442, so again, YMMV.
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Old October 7, 2011, 10:36 PM   #18
Eagleks
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If the recoil ends up to much, go to one that is not an airlight, featherlight, or any of those terms.... as they will have more "felt" recoil than a standard .38 spcl. J frame.
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Old October 7, 2011, 11:11 PM   #19
Mello2u
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Quote:
Donna1
AIRWEIGHT 38 SPL. CTG Model 37

This is the first gun I bought. Could you tell me about this revolver.

I would also like to know what type of ammo to buy?
The Smith & Wesson Model 37 is a light weight alloy framed model of the same dimensions as the older S&W Model 36 5-shot .38 Special revolver. Due to its lighter weight it will have greater felt recoil shooting the same loads than in a heavier gun.

As others have posted, your handgun is designed to use the .38 Special cartridge. It is offered in at least 30 different factory loads, ranging from 110gr up to 180gr. There are also snake loads which shoot small shot, sort of like a tiny shotgun.


As MLeake posted getting some after market grips can help deal with that. My sister appreciates a grip like the one below.



You might consider getting the least expensive factory ammo you can get to practice with, so you can save money or shoot more. For defensive use there are many loads which will do, but usually cost more. Some people like a relatively light bullet for a light gun and short barrel such as a 125 - 130gr hollow point, others like a heavier bullet such as a 158gr for more penetration.
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Old October 8, 2011, 08:13 AM   #20
MLeake
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I personally like the 158gr both for penetration, and also because my 442 seems to be regulated for 158. Point of impact is closest to point of aim with that weight round.
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Old October 8, 2011, 04:25 PM   #21
rodfac
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Donna...my wife has the same revolver, a S&W 637...which she has modified somewhat by adding Crimson Trace Laser grips. With her hand in the firing position, a small button on the front side of the grip activates the laser sighting dot. The point of impact for the laser coincides with her fired shots...great for night time use...across the bedroom, cellar...etc, but still affords use of the regular sights in bright sunlight...expensive (we paid $220 for her set of grips)...b ut very useful.

That said...your gun shoots .38 Special ammunition, regular velocity or +P. For home defense or carry, I'd recommend 125 to 130 gr Jacketed Hollow Point ammunition. In my tests (Pics of the recovered expanded bullets are posted elsewhere in this forum) expansion was excellent with several brands of jacketed hollow points but best with Remington's Golden Saber 125 gr JHP's. My wife now uses this type of ammunition for night stand or carry daily. Velocity across our chronograph was about 950 fps, and the expansion is truly impressive...a good, moderate recoiling defense load, allowing faster follow up shots...very controllable, and she's no "handgun nut" like her husband!

HTH's , PM me if you need add'l information. Rodfac
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