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Old September 25, 2011, 09:28 AM   #1
TX Hunter
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Triggers

I have noticed that alot of shooters like very light triggers, myself I have found that I prefer a fairly heavy trigger.
The other day I was shooting with my Son and a good friend of his, We had a few Centerfire Rifles, We all shot very well, but I found that I shot better with the heavier triggers than the lighter ones.
I wonder if anyone else Feels this way.
I think part of it with me, is that I work with my hands and the light triggers would go off way before I was ready
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Old September 25, 2011, 09:34 AM   #2
JACK308
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Well Tex you aint the only one who works with your hands I do also construction and my 308 had a 6 lb trigger I did not like it so I bought one that was lighter 3lbs and l like that alot better.
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Old September 25, 2011, 09:54 AM   #3
Pahoo
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It's always hard to switch back and forth

There is always a problem when switching back and forth between trigger pulls as well as lock-times. It all depends what you are shooting. I prefer a lighter trigger for bench work and slightly heavier for hunting. Often times when on the bench, I have to fire a few rounds to allow my brain to get with the program. My Contenders are set light and smooth and they always give me a problem when shooting from a heavier trigger. ....


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Old September 25, 2011, 10:09 AM   #4
TX Hunter
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It may be that I am used to a heavier trigger, I dont know the weight, When I am shooting a rifle I like to wait till mid pause in breath or half a breath, with slow steady pull to the rear the keeping my sights on the target.
I have shot very well like this for years.
When I shot the rifle with the very light trigger, the rifle would go off way before I wanted it to.
The owner of the rifle shot very well with it though, so I guess thats what matters.
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Old September 25, 2011, 10:10 AM   #5
mrawesome22
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Beiing suprised by the shot is a goood thing.
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Old September 25, 2011, 12:09 PM   #6
scoutman
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Beiing suprised by the shot is a goood thing

It's called the "open suprise break" and it is the correct way to utilize trigger action.
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Old September 25, 2011, 12:18 PM   #7
Jimro
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A "heavier" trigger can allow for a more deliberate pull, not necessarily a bad thing.

I do not like an extremely light trigger, but years of working with milspec triggers have built into muscle memory "finger on the trigger, eyes on the front sight post, take up the slack, eyes on the front sight post, BANG" and I still manage to shoot some tight groups.

But I'm no David Tubb or Sheri Gallagher...

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Old September 25, 2011, 01:31 PM   #8
SteelChickenShooter
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Interesting Topic

Prompts me to think about triggers I have had, used, and modified.

In one case, I had a trigger far too light, and I tended to fire a few times when not ready. Not being exactly steady, the gun would go off when I was off a bit off target.

In another case, a trigger was too harsh. It had a long rough pull and I would move off target by the time the shot broke. I replaced that with a Timney upgrade and had very good results.

I like the adjustable trigger, I think one maker calls theirs an accu-trigger. The little adjustment tool I find to be helpful to set a trigger for your own best results.

In a different case, one trigger had a detectable flaw or stopping point during takeup. As I held the rifle up and aimed at the tiny steel chickens, I could always tell (and pause if needed) just when the shot would break. I knew where that trigger was, and when I was back on the little white buggers, I'd snap it off.

For home defense cases where a shotgun or rifle might be used, I can see a long, hard, deliberate pull might be in order. I can see in cases where cold weather and gloves would be best used with a strong trigger pull. I also agree in other cases the lighter pull provides the best results.

I doubt there is no best or worst, right or wrong. Different people having different applications no doubt run the full spectrum from light to heavy.
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Old September 25, 2011, 06:13 PM   #9
4EVERM-14
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As a service rifle shooter I am required to have 4.5 lbs. triggers. So I am used to being a bit aggressive with this type setup. As with any weight trigger the release is a conditioned response. When the condition [the sight picture] is correct the response is the finger applying pressure to the trigger. This is supposed to occur without really thinking about it but it does take practice. Learning the trigger on a particular gun most of what it takes to shoot that gun well.
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Old September 25, 2011, 06:17 PM   #10
wingman
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Quote:
Learning the trigger on a particular gun most of what it takes to shoot that gun well.

Bingo;clear and to the point.
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Old September 26, 2011, 12:06 AM   #11
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Yep, I much much prefer triggers in the 1lb range, however it seems like it's hard to get that without spending quite a bit on a trigger for most guns. So anything 2.5lbs and under I can live with, but if it's heavier than that I really don't like it at all and I feel it does affect my accuracy.

I think it's really just a personal preference though. I've got a buddy that has used mostly shotguns his whole life and he hates light triggers.
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Old September 26, 2011, 10:05 AM   #12
tobnpr
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I prefer a 2-3 lb pull. Too light, and I end up breaking the shot before I'm ready.

I don't like the element of "surprise" and can't see how an unpredictable break can benefit accuracy... I need to know exactly when that trigger is gonna break, so it breaks when I want it to...
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Old September 26, 2011, 01:04 PM   #13
5whiskey
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Weight on the trigger is actually far less important than the overtravel and break point. I don't care much about take-up, I don't think it really affects trigger feel beyond mild annoyance. Overtravel is important. The break, however, should have no creep whatsoever in a rifle IMHO. That's why I prefer pre-accutrigger savage rifles. A very simple design with probably the cleanest breaking trigger I've ever felt. I have my trigger set for about 6 pounds, but it's a light six pounds.
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Old September 26, 2011, 01:19 PM   #14
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I've had Timney's and other good triggers set down to 2 lbs. and up to 6 lbs. I find that I like the 3-6 lb. range best as I can hold on zero and begin a nice steady "squeeze" while keeping on the center with a nice "surprise" fire. My main concern is that the trigger is short travel, crisp and smooth. I don't really care how much pressure it takes on it to fire.

I see guys at the range with these "hair" triggers and they don't squeeze like you're supposed to. They hold and keep "tapping" until it goes off. This is not the way you're supposed to shoot.

I shot competitive archery for years using a release aid. If you jam the trigger on one of those you really go off center. It taught me the squeeze along with the surprise always gave better results.
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Old September 26, 2011, 01:39 PM   #15
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Quote: I don't like the element of "surprise" and can't see how an unpredictable break can benefit accuracy

The purpose of the "open suprise break" is its teaching elements. It lets you know where your sights were (in relation to the aiming point) when the gun fired.
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Old September 26, 2011, 01:43 PM   #16
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There's only been two triggers that I've had a problem shooting due to being too light: a 3oz benchrest trigger on a Stohle action that a guy at the range let me try, and a 1oz Pardini pistol trigger. Those were ridiculously hard to control.

The lightest I ever had on my rifles was about 20oz on a Marlin, and whatever my Anschutz is set at now (probably 24oz or so).
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Old September 26, 2011, 01:47 PM   #17
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Try closing your eyes at the range (after first alligning the rifle) and "squeeze" one off. Try this with a round in the chamber and without a round in the chamber. If you have a buddy let him load (or not load) it for you so you don't know if it will kick or not. You'll either be surpised (good) or flinch (bad). If you don't use a squeeze you might be flinching on all your shots. This is why some shooters get tight groups and others never will.
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