The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Hunt

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old September 15, 2011, 10:55 PM   #1
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,650
Sometimes, the High Points of a Hunt Don't Involve Animals

I filled my tag, but that only set off a chain of events that lead to a 6-hour ordeal involving body damage and electrical issues with my truck.

Approx 3 year-old doe, double-lung, about 250 yards, no meat loss, due to the use of a 140 gr Partition and not hitting the shoulders. Rifle is a Ruger M77 Mk II ("Sporter"?), .270 Winchester, wearing Leupold VX-3 3.5-10x40mm, with a Harris model H ultralight bipod.


But, even while exercising the demons, the majesty of the desert was still surrounding us. (Stowing some cables, after a secondary battery was donated by the Camper Special {dual batteries}, to the ailing Ranger - note the antelope legs and home-made big game carrier sticking out of the bed.)

Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_1814_crop_800.jpg (129.5 KB, 1732 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1817_800.jpg (189.4 KB, 315 views)
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old September 15, 2011, 10:59 PM   #2
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,650
But, as the title suggests....
The high points of this year's Pronghorn Antelope hunt were all courtesy of Mother Nature. (I have dozens of great landscapes from this year's hunt. Only my three favorites are posted below.)





Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_1771_crop_800.jpg (75.1 KB, 257 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1739_800.jpg (90.0 KB, 255 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1775_800.jpg (86.3 KB, 255 views)
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 03:12 AM   #3
bswiv
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 4, 2006
Location: NE FL.......
Posts: 1,081
So different from where we live...............beautiful.......even if I think I would miss the trees......
bswiv is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 08:26 AM   #4
PTS1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 15, 2006
Posts: 246
I agree. A hunt with a scenic view is always a successful hunt.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg CIMG0350.jpg (253.8 KB, 43 views)
PTS1 is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 08:32 AM   #5
globemaster3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 28, 2006
Posts: 1,194
Frankenmauser, that's just incredible. Those are worthy of hanging on the wall!

I could get lost just sitting there staring at that while on a hunt.

I think you'd hear something along the lines of "Antelope? What antelope?"
globemaster3 is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 08:35 AM   #6
jimbob86
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 4, 2007
Location: All the way to NEBRASKA
Posts: 6,702
Quote:
Approx 3 year-old doe, double-lung, about 250 yards, no meat loss, due to the use of a 140 gr Partition and not hitting the shoulders
Perfect placement, there, FM!

I miss the wide open spaces of my youth ..... but November is coming, and the annual pilgrimage will begin!
__________________
TheGolden Rule of Tool Use: "If you don't know what you are doing, DON'T."

http://nefirearm.com/
jimbob86 is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 08:57 AM   #7
AllenJ
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 11, 2009
Location: Northern California
Posts: 1,251
FrankenMauser you could not be more right. Beautiful country and good friends make the trip worth it.
AllenJ is online now  
Old September 16, 2011, 08:57 AM   #8
Saltydog235
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 20, 2010
Location: Pawleys Island
Posts: 1,090
Beautiful scenery though I'd go crazy without the trees, swamps and rivers.
Saltydog235 is online now  
Old September 16, 2011, 09:40 AM   #9
ZeroJunk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 14, 2006
Location: Browns Summit NC
Posts: 2,471
Beautiful.
ZeroJunk is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 10:09 AM   #10
doofus47
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 9, 2010
Location: live in a in a house when i'm not in a tent
Posts: 1,252
yep.
doofus47 is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 12:37 PM   #11
FrontSight
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 9, 2005
Posts: 1,712
God Bless!
__________________
To kill something as great as a duck just to smell the gunpowder is a crime against nature. - Alan Liere
Democracy is a device that ensures we shall be governed no better than we deserve. - George Bernard Shaw
FrontSight is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 01:16 PM   #12
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,650
Thanks, guys. I hoped a few people would enjoy the photos. Feel free to share your own.

To add a bit of history to the mix....

In two of these photos (first two in second post), you're actually looking across the Oregon/California Trail.
From the small hill next to our camp site, you can see about 13 miles of the trail, with its sandstone (historic) and concrete (modern) markers.
In previous years, we've had to drive down the Oregon Trail, to retrieve game. (In some areas, the original ruts are preserved, and vehicles are prohibited. In other areas, the current roads follow the original trail.)


PTS1- great shot. Hunting in the desert has a beauty of its own.

Jimbob - Thanks. I shake too much to pull it off on my own, and like to sit for a while, watching the animals move across the land. So, I rely on the bi-pod. The Partition is way too tough for Antelope, but it is the most accurate hand load I have for that .270. I always try for head shots on does, but the variable winds left me doubting the success of trying a craniotomy.


Quote:
Originally Posted by globemaster3
I could get lost just sitting there staring at that while on a hunt.
It happens all the time.
Just before taking that doe.... I spent about an hour sitting cross-legged, rifle in my lap, on top of the hill by our camp, just taking in the beauty. Eventually, I happened to notice the Antelope making their way toward me (they were about a mile out, when I got lost in the abyss). So, I worked my way, about 600 yards, down the far side of the hill; and sat low in the sagebrush, again, for 20-30 minutes, before they grazed their way into view.
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 01:30 PM   #13
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,650
And...
A few more.

A storm rolling in (looks like we ended up with some distortion here).


Though you can see more character with the naked eye, the land may as well be as flat as the photo suggests.


And... Last year's Elk hunt. Taking a breather, after climbing several miles through a gnarly dead-fall area. They may look like small hills, but our camp site was at 8,800 ft asl, and the photo was taken above 9,500 feet. We're on top of the mountains, here.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 1772_800.jpg (134.3 KB, 206 views)
File Type: jpg 1717_800.jpg (135.3 KB, 206 views)
File Type: jpg 1207_800.jpg (155.8 KB, 205 views)
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 01:32 PM   #14
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,650
And...

Just like that, I can leave the trees behind, and drop into the desert.

(The trash in the photo belonged to a hunter that was returning to the area. At least ONE person up there wasn't a pig. )
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 1273_800.jpg (207.0 KB, 206 views)
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 01:38 PM   #15
Sarge
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 12, 2002
Location: MO
Posts: 4,895
One of the beautiful aspects of dove hunting is that it reminds us to look at the sky.


__________________
Visit us at The Sixgun Journal or the archive, at http://sargesrollcall.blogspot.com/
Sarge is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 03:02 PM   #16
BUFF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 27, 2011
Location: Augusta, KS
Posts: 220
Those are some beautiful pics. Wish I had some to add.

I have seen some really nice days while out on the hunt. Makes you believe in a higher power. In the field is where I can go and just watch the world go by and not think about anything but the beauty all around.

Besides, if you harvest something, that's when the work begins.
BUFF is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 03:06 PM   #17
jimbob86
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 4, 2007
Location: All the way to NEBRASKA
Posts: 6,702
I still say the finest sight in the outdoors is watching your children (or better yet, your grandchildren!) expertly doing something you taught them to do.
__________________
TheGolden Rule of Tool Use: "If you don't know what you are doing, DON'T."

http://nefirearm.com/
jimbob86 is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 03:16 PM   #18
jimbob86
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 4, 2007
Location: All the way to NEBRASKA
Posts: 6,702
Quote:
The Partition is way too tough for Antelope
Seemed to work.

The Speedgoat is a giant pulmonary and circulatory system propelled by some sinewy legs and nourished by a smallish gut ...... the whole point of which is to enable the animal to be propelled at speeds that will wreck a 4WD vehichle if it attempts to follow it across it's native terrain..... The trick is to poke a hole, any hole, in those giant lungs before the running begins. The animals' giant eyes make getting close enough to do that ....... problematic.
__________________
TheGolden Rule of Tool Use: "If you don't know what you are doing, DON'T."

http://nefirearm.com/
jimbob86 is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 04:17 PM   #19
markj
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 27, 2005
Location: Crescent Iowa
Posts: 2,965
Yes I miss hunting the antelope since I moved to Iowa. I saw one hung up in a fence once, he got stuck and died there, seemed kinda sad so we moved him to the ground. Fast animals that come to water often so set up by the water hole and wait...
markj is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 06:19 PM   #20
Jo6pak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 5, 2010
Location: West Coast...of WI
Posts: 1,451
Great pics guys.

I've been out on "the plains" a few times, and the vastness to me is almost claustraphobic. I can't explain it, but just being able to see that far and have nothing around feels very odd to me. It's not really a bad feeling just different I guess.

I'm much more as home in the coulees and timber of western Wisconsin.
__________________
NRA Life Member, SAF contributor.
Jo6pak is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 09:00 PM   #21
Sarge
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 12, 2002
Location: MO
Posts: 4,895
We were driving north of CO Springs last March, and watched a herd of antelope cross the highway at 40 mph+. The little does squirted under the fence but the buck nailed it, bounced back and shot across the highway the other direction, picking up speed as he went. He repeated this performance again, each time losing enough fur to stuff a pillow. Finally he crossed again and got under, losing another big patch of fur off his rump as he flew under the fence, where he rejoined the herd.

Sure was a show!
__________________
Visit us at The Sixgun Journal or the archive, at http://sargesrollcall.blogspot.com/
Sarge is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 11:29 PM   #22
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,650
Nice photos, Sarge.


Quote:
The Speedgoat is a giant pulmonary and circulatory system propelled by some sinewy legs and nourished by a smallish gut ...... the whole point of which is to enable the animal to be propelled at speeds that will wreck a 4WD vehichle if it attempts to follow it across it's native terrain..... The trick is to poke a hole, any hole, in those giant lungs before the running begins. The animals' giant eyes make getting close enough to do that ....... problematic.
Absolutely.
Antelope have one of the most forgiving "butter zones" of all North American game (in my opinion). But... it comes at a price. The small amount of large muscles on the animal means that hitting a shoulder is a terrible waste. Taking out both shoulders, is worse than throwing away an entire hind quarter.

As for getting close... It's a lot of fun.
The animals react differently, every year. So, I have to read them for a day, or two, before I feel I can make a successful stalk.

But... We hunt in the same place, every year. As such, we have learned the basic grazing patterns and natural funnels of the area. The goats never seem to deviate from their inherited patterns. Since our camp is almost perfectly centered in a set of water holes (ranging from a natural spring, to a cattle trough, to natural low spots) that approximately form a six pointed star, we get a lot of grazing traffic, and have a great view from "our" hill.
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old September 16, 2011, 11:31 PM   #23
cons14
Junior Member
 
Join Date: July 6, 2011
Posts: 7
Great pics. Thank you for sharing.
cons14 is offline  
Old September 17, 2011, 02:30 PM   #24
Crankylove
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 8, 2008
Location: The land of green Jello and vanilla icecream
Posts: 1,274
Quote:
We hunt in the same place, every year. As such, we have learned the basic grazing patterns and natural funnels of the area.
It also doesn't hurt that most of the roads into that area are overgrown two-tracks from the lack of travel over them the last few years (used to be much more travel over them, but in the last 3 years, I think we are the only ones using those roads anymore). Most years we go up, you can still see our tire tracks and marks in camp from the last year.........and this last hunt we only saw 3-4 other people in our area.

It is quite nice to be the only ones out there, almost our own private game preserve.
__________________
The answer to 1984 is 1776
Crankylove is offline  
Old September 17, 2011, 08:32 PM   #25
kaylorinhi
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2010
Location: The brown eye of america
Posts: 463
from the back door...

I awoke to the first frost, in my first house to this sunrise!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMGP4357.jpg (238.7 KB, 29 views)
__________________
Buy your guns by Yardline,
Not Looks.
kaylorinhi is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.13666 seconds with 10 queries