The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old August 21, 2011, 07:53 PM   #1
L2R
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 5, 2010
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 231
list of what to buy to start 327 reloading?

I have wanted to do this for years but have no one around to show me how. I have been reading posts until I am about cross-eyed.
Lots of opinions and threads are great but hard to find a simple list of what exactly to start.

If some would be willing, I would appreciate help with what specifically to buy.
Here is what I have purchased so far after reading so many threads. Please tell me what else I need to start (of course this will be limited production for now) or if something is seriously wrong.

Lee Classic press
Small & lg safety prime
Pro Auto disk powder measure
Adjustable charge bar
Riser for powder measure


As for materials, I am also at a loss. I have read that brass is the problem right now for 327 and I have some to start. So what, specifically, do I need.


please list what primers, bullets etc. that I should start with. (if left up to me,I would start with 100 gr. but willing to follow instructions).


Thanks in advance.
__________________
L2R


Evil cannot be reduced thru Legislation!
L2R is offline  
Old August 21, 2011, 08:48 PM   #2
Lost Sheep
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 24, 2009
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Posts: 2,996
In concert with your signature line "Chance favors the prepared mind", here is my first advice:

Get a copy of "The ABC's of Reloading". It is a compiled book by editors of many authors, so each edition is unique, but all have the essentials of reloading laid out in easily digestible prose. Under $20 almost everywhere, you can probably find a copy at your local library as well. No load data, though. In my opinion, every loading bench should have on on its bookshelf.

You called your press the Lee Classic. The Lee Classic Cast is a single stage. The Lee Classic Turret is a 4-station turret press. I assume you have the Classic Cast single stage. Please correct me if I am wrong and my answer will change, but only slightly.

The Lee Classic Press (the cast iron one, right?) is a good choice. It it the one with the breech lock (for quick die changes)? Very handy. Not essential, but handy.

Do you have dies yet? The Deluxe 4-die set is a bit more expensive, but handier, as installation and adjustment is simpler. The 3-die set uses the third die to perform two functions and the seating and crimping functions require separate adjustments that must be co-ordinated with each other. Once you know how, it is fairly easy, but always takes time. Once adjusted, though, you do save one step for each cartridge case being loaded. So, 3-die or 4-die is up to you and your personal loading style. 1) Simple setup and a 4-step loading process or 2) slightly more complex setup and a slightly faster 3-step loading process.

I recommend you use Lee Dies, since the Auto-Disk powder measure will work best with them. Whatever you get, get Tungsten-Carbide (also called Carbide or T-C) or Titanium Nitride. The alternative is tool steel, which requires that you lubricate the cases. Then wipe them clean. Two steps you can avoid if you use the (only slightly more expensive) Carbide dies.

While a scale is not ABSOLUTELY necessary for the physical steps of loading, it is the VERY NEXT thing I would buy (after Press and dies) Everything other than those 3 things just make loading more convenient, faster, more precise, more sophisticated or slightly safer. (Safety glasses - your shooting glasses are presupposed are not on my list because I assume you had those even before you got the press.)

If your press is the single stage, I don't think the riser is necessary. If the Turret, it is. Some people use two. I do. And the swivel adapter, too, which allows me to position my Auto-disk powder measure so its center of gravity is as close to the center of rotation of my turret as possible.

About which primers, powder, bullets and brass to use. I recommend you get at least two manuals. Lyman's is good. The "One Caliber, One Book" series of manuals are excellent. They are compiled of load data from many different sources. But they contain almost no educational material (like The ABC's of Reloading" does). Every other manual (like Lyman's, Sierra's, Speer's, etc) has its early chapters devoted to the "How-To" of handloading. The more different manuals you have, the more different writing styles and subject emphases you will experience. Get as many as you can afford. They don't all have to be recent issues, either. The techniques of loading have not changed much in the past 80 years. The "One Caliber, One Book" will have current recipes. Also, the powder manufacturers' and bullet manufacturers' web sites will also have current load data. Just double check them because typographical errors can happen.

When I mentored my friend loading his 500 Smith & Wesson, I researched a bunch of powders and settled on Trail Boss with lead bullets for him. I reasoned that a forgiving powder that was impossible to double-charge (TB is a "fluffy" powder that takes up a lot of volume). With a voluminous powder, it is easy to see if a case is under-charged or over-charged. Hodgdon (the maker of TB) recommends against using TB with jacketed bullets, so use either cast lead or copper-plated bullets with Trail Boss. You can use either magnum or standard primers.

See my next post for a list of web sites you may have missed. Sorry about your vision problems.

Lost Sheep
Lost Sheep is offline  
Old August 21, 2011, 09:19 PM   #3
Smaug
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 4, 2004
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 3,179
I'd start with the Lyman manual.

I'd also skip the adjustable charge bar; you don't need it. You'll be fine with the standard cavity sizes in the included disks.

You don't need a riser either.

You don't need a Classic Cast. I had one, and it was great. But not any better than the Challenger I have now with the steel linkages. Just a lot heavier and more expensive.

You'll need a caliper, and a 4-die set of carbide dies. (I recommend Lee)

Their scale is good too; simple, accurate, and cheap. I check my powder drops from time to time with this.

As for components, the brass doesn't matter much, but start with new brass for the first time. Starline (*---*), Winchester, and Remington (R-P) are all good.

A good all-around powder is Unique. You can make powder puff loads as well as light magnums with that. If you find you want more, step up to 2400 or H110, but you can't really load those down.

Primers: small pistol magnum. Brand doesn't matter.

Bullets: I like Berry's, after trying many different ones. (berrysmfg.com)

Loading trays, to keep things organized. I like Hornady's.

A dial caliper. (digital is nice, but they eventually need batts)

A inertia bullet puller hammer.

Check my signature links for more.
Smaug is offline  
Old August 21, 2011, 09:20 PM   #4
Smaug
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 4, 2004
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 3,179
Also, you may want to ask a moderator to move this to the reloading sub-forum. You'll probably get more response there. Lots of guys don't reload. I think you're on the right track though. This is one of those cartridges that may not be so hot normally, but if you reload, it opens a whole new world.
Smaug is offline  
Old August 21, 2011, 09:27 PM   #5
Lost Sheep
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 24, 2009
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Posts: 2,996
Oops. Forgot the simple list.

There isn't one.

Or, there is one, consisting of just three items. Initials P, D & M (named later)

Each individual's ideal list is different and tailored to the needs of the specific handloader.

Do you want large quantities?

Do you want extreme accuracy?

Are you mechanically inclined or all thumbs? (not a bar to handloading, but should modify your approach and your style)

and so forth.

Not on the list, but necessary are: Knowledge about the loading process, safety glasses and load recipes.

So, the three items of hardware/tools/gear all lists have in common.

Dies because fingers are not precise enough to form metallic cartridges

Press because fingers are not strong enough to form metallic cartridges. (Although, one kit does use a mallet to power the loading, we'll skip that for now)

Mete powder (a way to) because eyeballs are not precise enough to accurately gauge the amount of powder in a case. Some people measure by volume alone, but these handloaders are a rarity. Everyone else, whether the mete the powder out by volume or by weight, do so with the assistance of a scale.

So,
Press (mount it on a board and clamp the board to a table)
Dies
Scale

You have one of the three TOOLS you need to load. Get a set of Lee dies (compatible with your Auto-Disk powder measure) and preferably Tungsten-Carbide and a decent scale. Preferably balance beam, not electronic. The less expensive electronics are not reliable enough to use without a balance beam backup, and I would not even use an expensive one without such a backup.

Everything else just makes things faster, more precise, more convenient or slightly safer.

Things like a dropcloth to catch lost primers, spilled powder, debris from spent primers, etc. are nice to have.

A funnel to guide your measured powder charges into your cartridge cases is good, but you could make one out of paper if your budget is extremely tight.

A bullet puller is essential, but not until you have a loaded round you need to disassemble. I loaded for 7 years before I had one and another two decades before I ever had use for it.

Brass tumbler makes your brass shiny and clean, but you can achieve the cleanliness required with a piece of terrycloth or even an old undershirt. Shiny looks nice, but doesn't shoot any better.

Calipers are really good to have, but since component manufacturers are pretty good about sizing their product, I was able to get along without a pair for 30 years.

A powder trickler is handy for bringing a charge of powder (in your scale) up to a desired weight, but a chemist's spatula (for which a butterknife can substitute perfectly well) or a cartridge case twirled between your fingers to dribble powder one granule at a time into the scale's pan. But a powder trickler is more convenient (in my opinion).

Lost Sheep
Lost Sheep is offline  
Old August 21, 2011, 09:32 PM   #6
Lost Sheep
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 24, 2009
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Posts: 2,996
Other web site to look at

Let me share with you some posts and threads I think you will enjoy. So get a large mug of coffee, tea, hot chocolate, whatever you keep on hand when you read and think and read through these.

The "sticky" thread at the top of TheFiringLine's reloading forum is good, entitled, "For the New Reloader: Equipment Basics -- READ THIS FIRST "
thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=230171

The "sticky" thread at the top of TheHighRoad.com's reloading forum is good, entitled, "For the New Reloader: Thinking about Reloading; Equipment Basics -- READ THIS FIRST"
thehighroad.org//showthread.php?t=238214

The first draft of my "10 Advices for the novice handloader" is on page 2 of this thread, about halfway down.
rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=13543

rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=22344

"Budget Beginning bench you will never outgrow for the novice handloader" was informed by my recent (July 2010) repopulation of my loading bench. It is what I would have done 35 years ago if I had known then what I know now.
rugerforum.net/reloading/29385-budget-beginning-bench-you-will-never-outgrow-novice-handloader.html

rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=13543

Minimalist minimal (the seventh post down)
rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=107332

Thread entitled "Newby needs help."
thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=430391
My post 11 is entitled "Here's my reloading setup, which I think you might want to model" November 21, 2010)
My post 13 is "10 Advices for the novice handloader" November 21, 2010)

Thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=439810

thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=448410

Good luck,

Lost Sheep
Lost Sheep is offline  
Old August 21, 2011, 09:56 PM   #7
Colorado Redneck
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 6, 2008
Location: Northeast Colorado
Posts: 1,067
327 Fed Mag brass

The ONLY brass I have seen for the 327 Federal Mag is Federal brass. Right now you can buy it online at Midsouth Shooters. A little over $20 for 100.

I have just begun loading for this caliber. Haven't even had a chance to shoot my new SP101 yet! Dang!

I agree that you should start by reading loading manuals. Talk to people that have experience. Then start with fairly low charge rates and work up. Pay close attention to detail. We all started some way or another. Some have mentors that taught them, but others like myself started by reading, obtaining equipment, and then getting after it. It is fun!
Colorado Redneck is offline  
Old August 22, 2011, 05:05 AM   #8
L2R
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 5, 2010
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 231
following good advise

Thanks for the quick responses and I will follow all of it. But this is exactly why I had to post this. A newbie needs a place to start and follow a mentor until it becomes clear his/her preference. That being tools/equipment and the recipe for starters. So all your information and questions are good, it is helping me work thru this.

To answer a few questions:
-not all thumbs, pretty mechanically inclined.
-Already have a set of calipers and know how to use them.
-Bought Lee classic turret press.
-Want to make safe loads for starters, don't care right now about speed or accuracy until I get comfortable with the equipment.
-Midsouth and Midway both say they are 'getting' brass but don't have it yet. (maybe they had it and already out.) but I am on the wait list. If need be, I have other calibers to learn this on. 327 is what I don't have in the safe so it is where I wanted to start.
- I don't yet have any dies for this reason. I plan on carbide, Lee sets
The idea to buy a turret along with each set of dies as I go. All efforts to keep number of calibers to a minimum is long gone.
-forgot to mention I do have the lymans book # 19 I think.

Everything I have done so far, is what I have gleaned after sifting thru threads and opinions. If I missed it or got it wrong, I will correct it. The idea to get it right.


I will buy and read all the manuals but I only pick up 20% of reading material and maybe 70% while watching. Until my hands get onto a machine do I really get it. Only then can I go back and fully understand what is written. Maybe normal or a learning disability but it is my learning curve. It has kept me from this but jumping in now and with this forum's help, I will get thru this.

thanks guys, gotta go pay the bills and I will digest the post better tonight and follow what you recommend. I appreciate the advise more than you know.
__________________
L2R


Evil cannot be reduced thru Legislation!
L2R is offline  
Old August 22, 2011, 03:11 PM   #9
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,804
Things to take note of:
For moderate-to-full-power loads in the .327, you'll need small rifle primers. Small pistol magnum primers are not enough (with the exception of CCI, where small pistol mag happens to be exactly the same as a standard small rifle primer). If you substitute small pistol or small pistol mag primers, you'll end up piercing primers, and chasing a pressure gremlin that doesn't exist. For a new reloader, I imagine it would be a very frustrating experience.

We have a running thread for .327 load data, here on TFL: Share Your .327 Federal Mag Load Data.

Don't forget about the 'lowly' .32 S&W Long and .32 H&R. They would both do quite well in your GP100, and are fun to shoot. If you want a little more margin for error during your reloading learning curve, they may be a better starting point. (Or you could go with something else from your collection - 9mm, .38/.357, .44, .45 Auto, .45 Colt, or many rifle cartridges - whatever you've got.)


Published .327 data can be found in the following manuals:
Hodgdon 2011. (3 jacketed, 3 lead bullet weights)
Accurate 2011. (4 jacketed, 3 lead bullet weights)
Ramshot 2011. (4 jacketed, 3 lead bullet weights)
Hornady 8th (not 100% sure, mine is packed right now - double check before purchasing).
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."

Last edited by FrankenMauser; August 22, 2011 at 03:19 PM.
FrankenMauser is online now  
Old August 22, 2011, 03:25 PM   #10
Billy Shears
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 17, 2011
Posts: 604
Smaug wrote:
Quote:
If you find you want more, step up to 2400 or H110, but you can't really load those down.


I'm curious. I've been loading and shooting Unique for many, many years. Hot loads, fluff loads, everything. But I've never used H110. Why can't it be loaded down?
Billy Shears is offline  
Old August 22, 2011, 04:19 PM   #11
L2R
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 5, 2010
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 231
Just got home from work

I have a lyman 49th addition. I hope to start reading tonight. Meantime....

I am open to loading other calibers. I chose this because I have none and right now, this is the favorite flavor. I have had several pistols in my day, and this has amazing low recoil. I have bigger guns but this is a lot like a 38 special to me with a 3 inch barrel. SwEEEEEt.

If it makes sense to start elsewhere for some reason then that is fine. I plan on reloading 380, 38 special, 357 and 45 acp hand gun loads in time.

Whatever makes the most sense but I have more 38 special and 45 acp in the safe than anything else.

thanks for all the input and links. I did poke around for info before asking and threads are usually to debate or turn into one so lurking with no knowledge is like watching chinese TV. With no experience, one can't determine good info from great or bad. so thanks, each post has good info and I will explore all these links tonight as well.

Hate I waited so long to start reloading and looking forward to working this like an obsessed gambler with his own slot machine.
__________________
L2R


Evil cannot be reduced thru Legislation!

Last edited by L2R; August 22, 2011 at 04:53 PM.
L2R is offline  
Old August 22, 2011, 05:20 PM   #12
Billy Shears
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 17, 2011
Posts: 604
Quote:
Hate I waited so long to start reloading and looking forward to working this like an obsessed gambler with his own slot machine.

Heh heh. Just wait. A few months from now you'll be like so many of us...going to the range and shooting up box after box of ammo just so you have an excuse to do some reloading.

Welcome to the addiction.

Billy Shears is offline  
Old August 22, 2011, 07:32 PM   #13
L2R
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 5, 2010
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 231
midsouth got brass

update-

I checked yesterday and no brass nowhere.

checked today and midsouth said, 'limited supply'. It only let me buy 100 but it's a start. I still might start with another caliber if need be but at least I got a few more.

Wanted to pass along something back to those who have so graciously helped me.
__________________
L2R


Evil cannot be reduced thru Legislation!
L2R is offline  
Old August 22, 2011, 08:51 PM   #14
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,804
Quote:
With no experience, one can't determine good info from great or bad. so thanks, each post has good info and I will explore all these links tonight as well.
You already understand that experience is worth more that book knowledge, so you're getting a better start than most new reloaders.


If you're comfortable starting with .327 Federal, and have a good attention span (to catch mistakes, or double/triple check the process), don't let our suggestions hold you back. Putting together loads you want to reload will be more fun and better for learning, than working with a different cartridge that is currently unappealing to you.
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is online now  
Old August 23, 2011, 05:20 AM   #15
L2R
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 5, 2010
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 231
cross-eyed but the fog is beginnning to clear

Did alot of reading last night, the recipe for 327 here was a big help. Read alot of Lyman's first few chapters. I will have to read it another time or two for it to sink in.

All this voodoo is beginning to make a little sense. I am not a novice to manufacturing and I will follow the instructions to the letter.

That said, I still have alot of reading and will set up my work area as described in Lymans.

I guess that as the 327 has my interest, I will follow thru with it. I am going to buy Lee Carbide die sets, 32s. Still not sure about whether I need lube for this or not. I read that it is not always used with carbide.

It is curious that so little info is available on this fine cartridge even tho the .32 diameter sizes are many.

I am sure I will have more questions when I get a little closer.


P.S. I really do appreciate each and every post. I am on a Goldwing forum and regularly help those new to old wings. While I can't be of much help here (yet) I do return the favor to those I can. Hope to become a member of the 327 community here in the future and will explore other topics / calibers later.
thanks again.
__________________
L2R


Evil cannot be reduced thru Legislation!
L2R is offline  
Old August 23, 2011, 07:28 AM   #16
Billy Shears
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 17, 2011
Posts: 604
No need for lube on the .327 when using the Lee carbide dies.
Billy Shears is offline  
Old August 28, 2011, 07:11 PM   #17
L2R
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 5, 2010
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 231
looking a die sets

Been looking at die sets and as I now have a lee classicturret press and not too worried about speed, I thought I would keep it simple and get a lee deluxe 4 die set to make it easier to set up.

Here is the question, sounds like any 32 die set will work for 327. Looks like I have no options to buy at nachez or midway, out of stock. Don't see any 4 die sets offered at all.

So I googled lee deluxe 4 die set 32 and this is about all I can find.

http://www.titanreloading.com/lee-sp...stol-4-die-set

The other option is just to buy 3 die set I guess. I read that any will work but see the order numbers are different at midsouth the 2 available there.
http://www.midsouthshooterssupply.co...ADING+PRODUCTS

Any suggestions or opinions appreciated.
__________________
L2R


Evil cannot be reduced thru Legislation!

Last edited by L2R; August 28, 2011 at 07:21 PM.
L2R is offline  
Old August 28, 2011, 08:20 PM   #18
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,804
Don't get .32 S&W dies by mistake. Some of them are not 'dual purpose', to be used with .32 S&W Long and .32 H&R. (They aren't long enough. A .327 case cannot fully enter the die.)

Get something specifically labeled for at least .32 H&R. They're generally labeled as ".32 S&W Long / .32 H&R", or something similar. Right now, I believe RCBS is the only company specifically labeling their dies for .327 Federal, with ".32 S&W Long / .32 H&R / .327 Federal" (RCBS item number 21412 for the Carbide 3-die set).

If you really want the powder-through-expander die in the Lee set, I understand. I don't like it, though. If you're going to be using very many cast bullets, a Lyman 'M' die is well worth the cost. I have completely stopped using the other expanders I have for .32 S&W and .32 Long/H&R/.327, even for jacketed bullets. It's that good.

I coupled that with a Redding Profile crimp die, but it isn't necessary. If you go with a Lee die set, you should get a 'profile' crimp die in the set, any way (tapers to begin with, but turns into a heavy roll crimp, if you really crank it down).

As for me...
My personal preference is for RCBS or Redding, with the Lyman 'M' die added to the set. But, much of that is just personal opinion.
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is online now  
Old August 28, 2011, 08:41 PM   #19
excelerater
Junior member
 
Join Date: June 27, 2011
Location: Memphis TN
Posts: 694
for reloading to be cheap you need brass,range brass and 327 range brass is a no go.....

Id be curious what the cost per round is store bought VS reloads
and unless your plan on plinking 327 by the hundreds monthly Id
opt out...I shoot lots of different ammos but only reload 40 and 9
cause I blow through hundreds of rounds a month,brass is dirt cheap
as are common size bullets for 9 and 40.......
excelerater is offline  
Old August 28, 2011, 11:00 PM   #20
Crankylove
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 8, 2008
Location: The land of green Jello and vanilla icecream
Posts: 1,289
Quote:
for reloading to be cheap you need brass,range brass and 327 range brass is a no go....
Range brass may be nonexistent, but .32 S&W Long, and .32 H&R Mag are readily available for purchase, and aren't too bad in price ($15.99 per 100 cases for the last two bags I bought).

And while .327 Federal brass may not had as easily, when found it is not much more expensive than the other .32's. Even loading hot loads, the brass lasts quite a while, and loading moderate to low end will give a couple dozen reloads per case with ease.

It may not be as cheap as 9mm to reload, but its still certainly worth doing when you compare reloads with the price of factory ammo, and depending on bullet selection, I can actually load the .32's cheaper.

Using brand new brass and cast bullets, I can load .327 Federal for $0.27 a piece, or $13.50 per 50.

After the first loading, I don't count the cost of brass for any caliber, and the cost per 50 drops to $4.50, or about $0.09 each.
__________________
The answer to 1984 is 1776
Crankylove is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.12939 seconds with 9 queries