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Old September 21, 2011, 07:15 PM   #126
Jo6pak
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This may be a bit late to the party. But when we were dicussing using an AK-style gas system, I remembered that a company makes an adjustable gas block for a PSL
http://www.copesdistributing.net/pro...oducts_id=1336
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Old September 21, 2011, 11:33 PM   #127
Bill Akins
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Quote:
Stephanie B wrote:
It'd be ugly, but if you used a piston driving a small rotating wheel, with the gun's mechanism being operating by a connecting rod coming off the wheel, you could align the piston in almost any direction. That way, if the thing were to come apart, it would blow away from the shooter.
Good point Stephanie. If the gas were tapped to say a vertically reciprocating piston (not reciprocating horizontally in line with the shooters face) and that piston turned a wheel that operated the mechanism to cock the hammer, then as you said, if the system came apart nothing would fly to the rear into the shooter's face. I like how you think Stephanie. Although not exactly the same (because I hadn't envisioned a vertical piston), that's kind of similar to what I was thinking of earlier with using a toggle/locomotive train wheel that the piston would turn and would redirect that piston's force and travel back forward again. But Akumabito's latest self adjusting gas pressure valve may obviate the necessity for a complicated linkage like that. But as you said, no matter if it looked ugly, it could still work.

Quote:
Stephanie B quoted Bill Akins who wrote:
the operation of a steam locomotive's strut and wheels and how when the straight strut went back it turned the wheel a certain distance, then the inertia and counterweight on the wheel made it go the rest of the way around the circle.
Quote:
Stephanie B wrote:
Well, not exactly. Those pistons were double-acting, so they had power strokes in both directions of travel. The action of the piston on the other side of the locomotive was offset by 90 degrees, so that when the piston on one side was at either end of its travel, the other one was midway. (Three-cylinder locomotives had their piston-actions offset by 60 degrees.)
Anyway, you probably knew all that, but other folks might not have.
A good thing to mention for folks Stephanie. I did know that, but I just mentioned the flywheel part of it only to avoid describing how the whole locomotive wheel worked. Which is a deviation from my usual writing a book on every little detail Lol! I did know that the opposite side of the trains wheel strut was located so that as the other side's wheel reached the limit of its travel, the other strut had not and so it helped carry the other opposing wheel past its strut's end of travel binding point.

The flywheel helped to balance out that difference between the strut difference in travel in relation to each other between the opposing wheels, although the counterweight on the wheels does aid via inertia in helping the wheels to get past their end of strut travel "binding" point.

As you mentioned, the train wheel's struts have a power stroke both forward and rearward. Even though it could still operate with just a power stroke in one direction, (just with less power), because even if it only had a power stroke in one direction, the opposing wheel's strut being offset from the other wheel, would always carry the other wheel's strut past its point of wanting to bind at the end of its travel.

I have always been fascinated by how the locomotive wheel works. It has so many possibilities in other applications. When the strut of one train wheel reaches the limit of its forward travel, it has to have something get it rotated just a little past that point so it won't bind, to where the strut can now travel to the rear. So if opposing train wheel struts were timed to where as one reached the limit of its forward travel, and the opposing wheel had just reached the limit of its rearward travel, they would both bind up and not turn. Because neither wheel would be helping the other ones strut to continue past its binding point. So the opposing wheel's struts have to be offset enough from each other so that each opposing wheel and strut helps the other opposing wheel and strut past its end of travel "binding" point.

I've built three prototypes of air and water cooled (truly working water cooled barrel) dress up kits for the Ruger 10/22 that resemble the Maxim and Browning medium machine guns. I use several different brands of crank fire trigger activators on them. You turn the crank just like a pencil sharpener crank (or Gatling gun crank) and that causes a cam to actuate a strut to poke out and function the trigger as the crank is turned. Most of the time 4 times per crank revolution, but there are some cranks that do it 6 and 8 times per crank revolution. Anyway....

I experimented with making offset strut locomotive wheels that I attached to the spindle of the crankfire device in place of the crank handle. I plan to make a mini thimble thumb crank located between the spade grips so that I can literally crank the system to fire (using my two thumbs) as I hold onto the spade grips and the locomotive struts and wheels turn the spindle to function the trigger. That way I can keep both hands on the spade grips while still crank firing the gun. As can be seen in this below video I made of me experimenting with that. If you watch carefully, you can see where as one strut reaches its forward limit of its travel rotating one wheel, the other sides strut is offset so that it hasn't reached its forward limit yet, and thus continues to turn the spindle and that gets the other wheel's strut past its binding point. Thus each wheel always helps the other wheel past any forward or rear travel strut bind point.

I could use more wheels and struts connected together or a mini bicycle type chain/sprocket linkage, a belt, or even gears to connect the locomotive wheels to get to my mini thumb crank between the spade grips. I don't have the mini thumb crank for between the spade grips fabricated yet, but you can still see the basic idea of it working by my just working the struts.......

http://good-times.webshots.com/video...99763970ivXHkP

And another video with me putting the crank handle back on one side of the crank fire trigger activator's spindle, and then putting just one locomotive style wheel on the other side....seeking to use what is now wasted movement of the other side of the spindle to power another operation......

http://good-times.webshots.com/video...99763970qFLrCs

I just wanted to share that, to show how a locomotive train wheel and strut has applications to not only power a system by a piston reciprocating in virtually any direction and it doesn't matter to the wheel it turns whether the piston is vertical or horizontal just as you suggested and pointed out Stephanie, but to also show how the locomotive strut and wheel can redirect a piston's rearward force back forward again, and vice versa. As well as how just a single locomotive wheel on the opposite side of a spindle that is already being rotated by a source that does not require offset wheel struts, can allow that single locomotive type wheel to operate another function and therefore not waste that motion that is already being used anyway.

I still like the locomotive wheel/toggle linkage concept for redirecting the piston's force and direction. But Akumabito has shown a really good system for an adjustable gas amount valve, that once the plug is screwed in to a certain point, will self adjust to where no matter how much gas comes to the valve, it will only allow just so much gas to pass and the rest of the gas is vented outside the gas tube. I have to admit that is a much less bulky and less complicated system than locomotive wheels/toggle linkages.

But still, after reading your post Stephanie and continuing to think about locomotive wheels, allow me to indulge in a bit of fanciful thinking, which although fanciful and cumbersome, would still work.....

Visualize a gas trap over the end of the barrel on the 1858 Remington revolver. Now visualize TWO short gas tube chambers attached vertically from that gas trap powering two separate pistons vertically and which turn two separate wheels at the upper front area of the barrel (your front sight would be BETWEEN the two wheels). Now visualize two offset struts going rearward from those two front of barrel locomotive wheels at the gas trap, going to and connecting to two more locomotive wheels that are located over the hammer at the rear of the revolver. When the shot fired, gas would go into the gas trap, then go to TWO short vertical gas tubes, powering TWO pistons, which would turn TWO locomotive wheels, which would have TWO offset struts going to the rear to another set of TWO locomotive wheels attached over the top of the hammer. Then a cam on the spindle connecting those two over the hammer locomotive wheels would cock the hammer as the wheels rotated!

We could even use Akumabito's latest pressure limiting relief valve and hook that up to a little steam whistle so that excess steam...er...gas from the valve, would toot the whistle! The steam whistle could even be the front sight. Then shout "All aboard!" just before we fired. Lol! We could even put a little cow catcher on the front of the gas trap to aid in protecting the front vertical gas tubes/wheels and struts when they were funneled into a monster of a holster!

With it having four wheels on top in line with each other, if we made it full auto and tied the trigger back, we could even turn it upside down, put it on the ground, pull the hammer and release it, and it would roll along on its own for six shots like a kid's toy train shooting and tooting! Lol! You know...."It's for the children". The anti-gunners would love that. Laughing so hard I think I hurt myself!

Hilarious though it sounds....it would work!

But anyone even contemplating building such a six shot, semi-auto, muzzleloading revolver of mass destruction should be immediately sent to a re-education camp, forced to wear pink and listen to Yoko Lennon songs and with toothpicks holding their eyelids open like in "A clockwork Orange" forced to repeatedly watch Rebecca Peters re-education videos extolling the horrors of guns in the hands of anyone other than the police of the new world order funded by George Soros, until they "got their mind right" like Paul Newman in "Cool hand Luke".

But seriously, Baronet Sir George Cayley built, and perhaps flew, using internal and external combustion gunpowder-fueled model aircraft engines in 1807, 1819 and 1850. That's a true fact. So don't laugh, okay go ahead and laugh Lol.

Or we could do away with the front wheels, and just have copper tubing running back on both sides of the barrel, bringing the gas from the gas trap, back to the rear, to two separate vertical gas tubes/pistons connected to two wheels over the hammer that have a cam on the wheel spindle to cock the hammer. Hmmm, that would actually look kinda cool and be a lot less cumbersome at the front of the barrel than a four wheeled version. I actually kind of like that idea. Instead of one long piston traveling to the rear, (in line with a persons eye), instead gas traveling rearward in copper tubes from the front of barrel gas trap, would power two small vertical pistons in small short gas tubes either over the hammer, or to each side of the hammer. Then those pistons would turn two small locomotive style wheels located over the top of the hammer. And a cam on the spindle of the wheels would cock the hammer. Every time you fired, the two pistons attached to struts would move up and down and rotate the wheels which would turn and the cam on the wheel's spindle would cock the hammer.

It would not only be a "Steampunk" gas operated, semi-auto muzzleloading revolver....It would be a "Steam LOCOMOTIVE punk" gas operated, semi-auto muzzleloading revolver. The ULTIMATE "steampunk" weapon if ever there was one. LOL!!!

Okay, the aliens are coming anytime now to kidnap me for this new steampunk gun technology I just revealed!

Sorry, just had to indulge in that. But seriously, the principle is sound and it could be built and actually work! That's the hilariously funny thing about it!

Okay, I've stopped laughing at my own fanciful silliness now. Back to discussing the best design for this muzzleloading semi-auto revolver.

Can't wait to see what Akumabito's latest rendering will be, based on mine and his last posts regarding his pressure limiting spring valve concept, and the system speed concerns I listed in my last post.

And I appreciate you Stephanie B, Jo6pak, Blue Train, Akumabito, and all the other members who have participated thus far in this thread. It's been and continues to be a fun discussion into possibilities. Hopefully it will lead to some interesting prototypes.


.
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"To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target".

Last edited by Bill Akins; September 22, 2011 at 05:15 AM.
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Old September 22, 2011, 12:45 AM   #128
Bill Akins
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Quote:
Jo6pak wrote:
This may be a bit late to the party. But when we were dicussing using an AK-style gas system, I remembered that a company makes an adjustable gas block for a PSL
http://www.copesdistributing.net/pro...oducts_id=1336
Thanks for that gas block link Jo. That looks very interesting. I read the description and was hoping it would explain exactly how it operated. But it didn't and only mentioned its effects and how to install it. I wonder if it operates on the same gas limiting spring valve like Akumatibito was proposing?
Anyone here know how it operates internally? I see a nut that obviously has some effect, but I wonder if it just makes the expansion chamber in front of the piston larger or smaller, or partially covers the gas tap hole or acts like Akumabito's sliding valve, self limiting, spring loaded, gas valve concept?
I think I'll give them a call and ask them. But whew! $100.00 for a gas block unit.



.
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"This is my Remy and this is my Colt. Remy loads easy and topstrap strong, Colt balances better and never feels wrong. A repro black powder revolver gun, they smoke and shoot lead and give me much fun. I can't figure out which one I like better, they're both fine revolvers that fit in my leather".
"To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target".

Last edited by Bill Akins; September 22, 2011 at 04:17 AM.
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Old September 22, 2011, 01:37 PM   #129
Stephanie B
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Quote:
Baronet Sir George Cayley built, and perhaps flew, using internal and external combustion gunpowder-fueled model aircraft engines in 1807, 1819 and 1850.
Why not? If I remember correctly, the very first diesels were designed to operate on coal dust.
Quote:
a locomotive train wheel and strut has applications to not only power a system by a piston reciprocating in virtually any direction and it doesn't matter to the wheel it turns whether the piston is vertical or horizontal
The Heisler logging locomotive is a fine example of that.
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Old September 22, 2011, 04:51 PM   #130
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@Bill. A co-worker is considering this gas-block for a PSL build. That's how I knew about it. If he orders it soon, I can get a look at it, and see how it functions.

As soon as he mentioned it, I immediately thought of this project
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Old September 22, 2011, 11:50 PM   #131
Bill Akins
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Quote:
Jo6pak wrote:
@Bill. A co-worker is considering this gas-block for a PSL build. That's how I knew about it. If he orders it soon, I can get a look at it, and see how it functions. As soon as he mentioned it, I immediately thought of this project
Thanks Jo. Yes please let us know how it operates after you look at it.

You know as soon as Akumabito showed his concept rendering of a adjustable gas pressure relief valve, I immediately thought of a similar type of pressure relief valve that is on my air compressor. That when too much pressure in the compressor's air tank is present, it automatically opens to vent pressure from the tank so it won't over pressurize. But that valve in my air tank is set to just one pressure rating and is not adjustable.

What would be great to find is, an off the self (so it doesn't have to be fabricated) adjustable pressure relief valve that is about 1/2 inch or smaller in diameter so that it could screw into the front of the gas tube where the gas tube meets the gas port hole coming from the gas trap. So the valve could be easily unscrewed from the gas tube assembly for cleaning. I thought about looking into an adjustable air pressure valve, but it would be best to have one that didn't use O rings that could be damaged by the heat or pressure of hot gas blowing by and by not having O rings would not collect as much fouling which could build up around O rings. The best would be to have one that was all brass or steel with no rubber O rings.

But since a lot of air compressor valves do use O rings and sometimes even cone shaped rubber ends on their valves (like mine does), I have to look for one that doesn't. Or perhaps look for a STEAM pressure relief valve, that is already made to take high heat, that would either have no O rings, or have high temperature O rings. And again, it has to be the correct diameter to screw into the frontal area of the gas tube. I think that would do the same thing as Akumabito's concept, but be an off the self item ready to utilize and make fabricating this system much easier. Akumabito's idea is a really good one and I'm going to start a hunt for the right kind of adjustable off the shelf valve. But if one doesn't exist exactly like is needed, I may have to make one.


.
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"This is my Remy and this is my Colt. Remy loads easy and topstrap strong, Colt balances better and never feels wrong. A repro black powder revolver gun, they smoke and shoot lead and give me much fun. I can't figure out which one I like better, they're both fine revolvers that fit in my leather".
"To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target".
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Old September 23, 2011, 09:48 AM   #132
Lou G.
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Semi-Auto Black-Powder Guns

A U.S. patent issued to C. E. Barnes in 1856 for a rapid-fire gun (#15,315) included a provision for automatically pushing the hammer to full-cock by means of gas escaping rearward from the nipple. Obviously, this principle could have been applied to a typical percussion revolver of the time: gas escaping through an enlarged nipple channel and blowing the hammer to full-cock would have rotated the cylinder in the usual manner.

The earliest patent I've found for a true gas-operated revolver is Br. Pat. #14,130 of 1886, issued to Richard Paulson. Gas tapped off under the barrel acts on a spring-loaded piston attached to an operating rod, which slides rearward through a hollow cylinder pin to cock the hammer. Details are given in A.W.F. Taylerson's book "The Revolver, 1865-1888."

Last edited by Lou G.; September 23, 2011 at 11:50 AM.
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Old October 4, 2011, 03:50 AM   #133
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Interestingly, both ideas were re-invented in this thread.

Bill had the idea to enlarge the nipples, allowing more gas to escape out the rear. Otto and myself came up with ideas of pushing back the hammer through a modified arbor pin.

Anyhow, I've been buy with work for the past few days, but now I'm back to kick this thread back to page 1 where it belongs :P

Most commerically available regulators are rather bulky. I've found this manufacturer that is making a nice and compact unit, but with a base price of $150, plus nearly a hundred more for a modicum of protection against BP residue, I don't think it's a viable option.

So then I started looking at commercially manufactured airgun regulators. There's these which go for $80. There are a few more, but they tend to be for very specific applications. There are also paintball regulators. A little too large in most cases, plus they tend to be sealed units, making maintenance prtty difficult.

I'll have to poke around some more, but for now it seems the DIY route would still work out best..
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Old October 5, 2011, 06:40 AM   #134
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It's too bad that one is so expensive Akumabito. In looking at the drawing of its internals at that first link, that one might have been just the thing. I saw the regulator at your second link, but nothing there about its internals. We would definitely need one that would be adjustable over a range of pressure.


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"This is my Remy and this is my Colt. Remy loads easy and topstrap strong, Colt balances better and never feels wrong. A repro black powder revolver gun, they smoke and shoot lead and give me much fun. I can't figure out which one I like better, they're both fine revolvers that fit in my leather".
"To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target".
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Old October 5, 2011, 07:31 PM   #135
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This is all great, and you guys have come up with some nice ideas. However, I don't see anyone discussing how to add a DISCONNECTOR to the 1858 Remington lockwork. And without a disconnector the hammer will just follow the piston back to the cylinder without setting off the cap. Just another thing to think about.
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Old October 6, 2011, 02:29 PM   #136
Bill Akins
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Quote:
Batja wrote:
This is all great, and you guys have come up with some nice ideas. However, I don't see anyone discussing how to add a DISCONNECTOR to the 1858 Remington lockwork. And without a disconnector the hammer will just follow the piston back to the cylinder without setting off the cap. Just another thing to think about.
Good thinking Batja, but if you will re-read back through the thread, you will see that I mentioned multiple times in my posts that the lockwork would have to be modified so that when the trigger was functioned and the hammer cocked semi-automatically from the shot, that the hammer would stay to the rear even though the trigger was still depressed, and that the trigger would then have to be released so it could reset in order to drop the hammer when the trigger was functioned again. Otherwise as you recognized, without modifying for a disconnector as you mentioned, the hammer would just follow the piston back forward and might not have enough inertia to pop the cap....or even if it did pop the cap, it would go full auto, and the idea here is to make a semi-auto 1858 Remington, not a full auto one.

In fact I just received a stainless 1858 hammer in the mail today that I bought on gunbroker with the idea of modifying it so that when the trigger was functioned and the hammer pushed back from the shot, that the hammer would stay in the cocked position even though the trigger was still depressed. Then when the trigger was released that would reset the sear so that when the trigger was functioned again that would drop the hammer.

So good thinking on your part Batja, and be assured we are well aware of that.


.
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"To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target".
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Old October 8, 2011, 08:35 PM   #137
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You Won't BE The First!

I recall reading somewhere that in the 1600's an inventor demonstrated a firearm that fired semi-automatically in England. Unfortunately, he didn't patent it and no description of the gun has survived the years.

Go to a local technical college that has teaches CAD/CAM courses and design your gun on a computer! See how the computer model would work!

GOOD LUCK!
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Old October 28, 2011, 10:55 PM   #138
Bill Akins
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Sorry I haven't been posting recently as much fellas. I've been busy with some projects. I'll continue to try and post more when I can but things have been pretty hectic lately. When things slow down a bit, I hope to get back on figuring out and making some of these concepts we've been discussing. In the meantime, continue posting your ideas and I'll try to get in here when I can to read them.


.
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"This is my Remy and this is my Colt. Remy loads easy and topstrap strong, Colt balances better and never feels wrong. A repro black powder revolver gun, they smoke and shoot lead and give me much fun. I can't figure out which one I like better, they're both fine revolvers that fit in my leather".
"To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target".
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Old November 6, 2011, 05:21 PM   #139
Asgardnz
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Mysterious Island(2005) guns

I know the man that made the harmonica rifles used in the movie. As I recall some were fully functional, some blank firing and some non firing. There may have been a breachloading one. I will ask him. He used to manufacture and export black powder firearms from New Zealand years ago. He is an amazing engineer. I also know the armourer who worked on the film and he may remember why there are continuity problems between shots. I remember playing with one of the rifles and this weekend just bidded on a blank firing one at an auction(Militaria.co.nz).
Just spoke to a friend who said some of the rifles where chambered for .38 cartridges. He said the director kept telling the actor to turn the cocking handle the wrong way and the rifle maker was on set but the director refused to listen to him.

Last edited by Asgardnz; November 6, 2011 at 11:17 PM.
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Old November 7, 2011, 03:47 AM   #140
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I found the man who was the asst movie armourer for the Mysterious Island 2005 movie harmonica rifles. His name is Kevin Godkin and as you mentioned Asgardnz, he is in New Zealand where you live. I wrote to him from his Moviearmourer.com website and he responded.

My inquiry.....

To: admin@moviearmourer.com
Subject: Movie Armourer: Your being armorer on the harmonica rifles of "Mysterious Island 2005"
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2011 00:19:49 -0500
From: Akins_Bill@yahoo.com

This is an enquiry e-mail via http://moviearmourer.com/ from:
Bill Akins <Akins_Bill@yahoo.com>

Dear Mr Godkin.

For some time I have tried to research and find out more about the Captain Nemo harmonica rifles from the 2005 movie "Mysterious Island". But I was unable to find any information. There seemed to be nothing on the internet in the way of pictures of text information about those harmonica rifles.
I did download the movie and by watching and replaying the segments of the harmonica rifles firing, I was able to understand somewhat how they operate. I found out that you were an armorer on that movie and was hoping that you might be able to provide me with more accurate information on exactly how they worked, what happened to them, if they still exist and if any of them are available for purchase. Any pictures or information that you could provide would be much appreciated.
Sincerely, Bill Akins


Mr Godkin's response....

Hi Bill ,
I cant give you all the info at present as i'm in Bangkok what country are you in, I will not be back in NZ about next week ,we have been planning to put some pictures of one on our web site but as you may see its still under construction we have one in our armoury and I know where the rest are.
Regards Kevin Godkin.


I wrote to Mr Godkin in the middle of Sept, and except for his above response, I haven't heard back from him since then.


Asgardnz, sounds like you may be knowledgeable with how these harmonica rifles operated and advanced the harmonica block. What a stroke of luck that you actually know the man who built them Asgardnz. Did Kevin Godkin actually build them or was it someone else? Would you please fill us in on anything else that you know about them that you haven't already mentioned? Also if you know of any more pictures of them that might be available online. Did they have any pics online from that auction where they were selling one you mentioned?


.
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"This is my Remy and this is my Colt. Remy loads easy and topstrap strong, Colt balances better and never feels wrong. A repro black powder revolver gun, they smoke and shoot lead and give me much fun. I can't figure out which one I like better, they're both fine revolvers that fit in my leather".
"To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target".
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Old November 10, 2011, 08:48 PM   #141
Asgardnz
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Hi Bill

I know Kevin Godkin very well. I'll talk to him about the film and the rifles. I bidded for a blank firing one at auction a couple of weeks ago. I haven't got an invoice yet as they are slow sorting out postal bids, but my bid was higher than the selling price so maybe I got it. If I did I'll try and post video and photo's online.
The person that built them was Brian Redwood of Redwood Engineering. He has talked about making some more, although he has had some health issues lately.
All the rifles he built were for the person that ordered them. I saw one for sale a few years ago. The one I've bidded on sounds like it is a good one as the desciption says all brass. I believe some had aluminium mags that were anodised. Apparently the mags cost more than the rest of the rifle to make.
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Old November 10, 2011, 09:04 PM   #142
Asgardnz
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The auction company was Militaria.co.nz. They did have it in a photo in their online catalogue, but I think they have taken it down. I downloaded it, I just have to figure out how to upload it to my post.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Harmonica.jpg (71.7 KB, 21 views)
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Old November 10, 2011, 09:08 PM   #143
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I think the photo is there ok. It was lot number 1635.
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Old November 11, 2011, 02:48 AM   #144
Bill Akins
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Thanks for that info Asgardnz. Do you know if the blank firing one you bidded on is capable of firing, or being converted to fire live cartridges or black powder loads or if it is incapable of ever live firing? Be sure and let us know if you get it and post lots of pics here. Because the only other still pics I've ever been able to find are the screenshots I made from the movie and now the one you posted. But the one you posted from the auction doesn't show it close enough to make out details well. Not your fault though, it was from the auction. It would be great if you get it, if you could do a whole report for us on its operation. It's really great that you personally know Mr Godkin and also Brian Redwood the original maker of the rifles. It would be great if Brian Redwood would make some more of them in bulk, in percussion, for black powder shooters.


.
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"This is my Remy and this is my Colt. Remy loads easy and topstrap strong, Colt balances better and never feels wrong. A repro black powder revolver gun, they smoke and shoot lead and give me much fun. I can't figure out which one I like better, they're both fine revolvers that fit in my leather".
"To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target".
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Old November 11, 2011, 06:08 PM   #145
Jo6pak
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Join Date: August 5, 2010
Location: West Coast...of WI
Posts: 1,461
Thought I'd give a update.
My co-worker has changed his mind on the PSL build for now. So I won't be able to get hands on the adjustable gas-block.

I'm going to try an sneak out to the range this weekend with my muzzleloaders. But with gun-deer season starting next weekend it may be crowded tho.
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Old November 11, 2011, 06:09 PM   #146
Asgardnz
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Join Date: November 4, 2011
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 35
Hi Bill. I've just been on the phone to Kevin and we discussed doing an article. I used to be a photographer years ago. So I will photograph his, and mine(if I got the one at auction) and I will go and see Brian and talk to him about an interview. Kevin reminded me these rifles were originally built for a TV series called Greenstone. I had forgotten about that series- I was an extra on that playing the part of a soldier. Kevin said he was the one who had rifles converted to take 38 cases to make the rifles quicker to reload on set. He wanted to use .44 cases for a bigger powder load and thus bigger flash, but Brian thought that the chamber walls would be too thin. Kevin has been talking to another mutual friend called "Chopper", who supplies firearms for film work about improvements that could be done to the actions to make them smoother. Kevin recalls that the barrels are all smooth bore, but that Brian did make at least one spare rifled barrel. I'll check with Brian on that. I'll try to see Brian during the week.
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Old November 12, 2011, 12:21 PM   #147
Bill Akins
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Join Date: August 28, 2007
Location: Hudson, Florida
Posts: 1,030
Quote:
Thought I'd give a update.
My co-worker has changed his mind on the PSL build for now. So I won't be able to get hands on the adjustable gas-block.
I'm going to try an sneak out to the range this weekend with my muzzleloaders.
Thanks for trying anyway Jo6pak. Have a great time at the range.


.
__________________
"This is my Remy and this is my Colt. Remy loads easy and topstrap strong, Colt balances better and never feels wrong. A repro black powder revolver gun, they smoke and shoot lead and give me much fun. I can't figure out which one I like better, they're both fine revolvers that fit in my leather".
"To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target".
Bill Akins is offline  
Old November 12, 2011, 12:24 PM   #148
Bill Akins
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Join Date: August 28, 2007
Location: Hudson, Florida
Posts: 1,030
Quote:
Asgardnz wrote:
Hi Bill. I've just been on the phone to Kevin and we discussed doing an article. I used to be a photographer years ago. So I will photograph his, and mine(if I got the one at auction) and I will go and see Brian and talk to him about an interview. Kevin reminded me these rifles were originally built for a TV series called Greenstone. I had forgotten about that series- I was an extra on that playing the part of a soldier. Kevin said he was the one who had rifles converted to take 38 cases to make the rifles quicker to reload on set. He wanted to use .44 cases for a bigger powder load and thus bigger flash, but Brian thought that the chamber walls would be too thin. Kevin has been talking to another mutual friend called "Chopper", who supplies firearms for film work about improvements that could be done to the actions to make them smoother. Kevin recalls that the barrels are all smooth bore, but that Brian did make at least one spare rifled barrel. I'll check with Brian on that. I'll try to see Brian during the week.
That sounds great Asgardnz! Please keep us updated.


.
__________________
"This is my Remy and this is my Colt. Remy loads easy and topstrap strong, Colt balances better and never feels wrong. A repro black powder revolver gun, they smoke and shoot lead and give me much fun. I can't figure out which one I like better, they're both fine revolvers that fit in my leather".
"To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target".
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Old November 16, 2011, 10:34 AM   #149
Asgardnz
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Join Date: November 4, 2011
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 35
Hi Bill
I got the auction invoice yesterday confirming that I got the harmonica rifle along with a couple of old pistols. I am really pleased with the price. All up the rifle will cost me less than $400. Originally I think the rifles were sold to the film company for $1000 each. I will make arrangements today to get them shipped. I need the police to approve the shipping as the guns are coming from a different city. Once the rifle arrives I will take it to Brian for a check over and photograph it. I'll then talk to him and post the photo's and interview.
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Old November 18, 2011, 05:17 AM   #150
Bill Akins
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Location: Hudson, Florida
Posts: 1,030
Great! Can't wait to see your pics and report.


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"This is my Remy and this is my Colt. Remy loads easy and topstrap strong, Colt balances better and never feels wrong. A repro black powder revolver gun, they smoke and shoot lead and give me much fun. I can't figure out which one I like better, they're both fine revolvers that fit in my leather".
"To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target".
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