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Old August 10, 2011, 01:08 PM   #1
lkutschmanoltmer
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TOWER GR w/CROWN 1420 FLINTLOCK

Greetings,
I purchased a Tower "GR" w/crown, flintlock at an estate sale and am having difficulty in determining it's age and/or maker. The only marks are the Tower, GR+ Crown and the number 1420 on the barrel. Handle looks machine made as does the stamping of "Tower" On the other hand it does not look quite like the Japan examples from the 70's. Any feedback would be appreciated.
001.jpg

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Regards, 001.jpg
Christian
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Old August 10, 2011, 03:22 PM   #2
Scorch
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Your pistol is a reproduction flintlock pistol, quite likely produced during the 1970-1980 period. First clue: flintlock actions were not introduced until the early 1600s and not widely adopted until the middle of the 17th Century, supplanting earlier matchlocks (for reliability) and wheellock mechanisms (for simplicity and lower cost). Another clue: stamped hammer and springs. These parts were typically forged in early guns due to the strength needed for repeated firings. And finally: varnish finishes did not become the norm until the 1800s, prior to that time, oil finishes of various types were the norm for military arms.
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Old August 10, 2011, 03:40 PM   #3
lkutschmanoltmer
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Tower Flintlock

Thank you!! Does the gun have any value or is it simply something for my son to enjoy?
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Old August 10, 2011, 03:56 PM   #4
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It is most likely a fully functional weapon that an inquisitive 12 year old with access to firework and marbles can use to punch holes into furniture and playmates. As such the "something for my son to enjoy" needs some qualification
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Old August 10, 2011, 03:59 PM   #5
Hawg Haggen
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Japan imported these by the boatload in the 70s. I remember Dixie selling these for 49 bucks in 72 and offering to tune the locks to make them spark for another 10. It would be best served as a wall hanger.
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Old August 10, 2011, 05:27 PM   #6
James K
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Another clue to a repro is the presence of a serial number to comply with modern laws. Very few genuine antiques will have a serial number, and none will have a "COO", a Country of Origin marking, required by U.S. law after 1896.

Jim
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Old September 6, 2011, 07:12 PM   #7
Brim5player
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Same Gun, Only Different

I have the same gun only there are a few things different, the pins next to the crown on his gun are closer and the pin on the left side, i do not have that. Also i took the gun apart to clean it up and i found various numbers such as 272, 682 and 82. Also my gun isnt varnished it has an oil finish. My email is cod2expert@gmail.com email and ill send the pictures to whomever can help me.
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File Type: jpg IMG_0511.jpg (244.5 KB, 63 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_0507.jpg (254.4 KB, 50 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_0510.jpg (244.7 KB, 50 views)

Last edited by Brim5player; September 6, 2011 at 07:26 PM. Reason: adding pictures
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Old September 6, 2011, 09:02 PM   #8
jamesicus
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It is an approximation (reproduction) of a British Light Dragoon Pistol. Here is a reference page relating to British Military flintlock firearms manufacture and markings.

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Old September 7, 2011, 05:20 PM   #9
James K
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I like the term "approximation". We need a word for those guns that are neither replicas, or reproductions, both of which imply close copies. But there are many modern guns that resemble ("approximate" as a verb) antiques, like those .44 caliber "Navies" and brass frame "Confederate" revolvers, that sort of resemble antiques but are "guns that never were."

Good word, "approximation."

Jim
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