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Old August 10, 2011, 12:37 AM   #1
oo0juice0oo
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Can't stop shaking

So I've come across a problem lately with my pistol shooting. I've started shaking pretty badly. This used to only be an issue during extended range sessions, but now I can hardly make it through a single magazine before it starts. Any ideas on what could be my problem? I'm shooting a Glock22 utilizing a weaver stance.
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Old August 10, 2011, 12:41 AM   #2
BarryLee
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There are a variety of health issues that could cause this, so you might want to consult your Physician. An easy thing to try might be to cut back on caffeine, energy drinks and sugar.
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Old August 10, 2011, 12:50 AM   #3
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The other thing is to make sure you have a good meal beforehand. If you are hungry or possibly hypoglycemic, you will be a lot less stable. Hopefully it isn't a medical condition.
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Old August 10, 2011, 12:56 AM   #4
Edward429451
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Make sure you're well hydrated also. It's been very hot lately and if you don't compensate by drinking more water you will become dehydrated and hello tremors.
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Old August 10, 2011, 12:57 AM   #5
kozak6
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It could be some dehydration, an electrolyte problem, or maybe low blood sugar. You could cut the caffeine and try some Gatorade and see if it helps. It could also be from a lack of sleep or stress.

Or, it could be a sign of a serious medical condition. Perhaps a doctor's visit is in order.
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Old August 10, 2011, 07:16 AM   #6
jrothWA
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It sounds like you have...

over-exerted yourself, tryin g for the perfect shot.

RELAX and enjoy, now it the time to MAKE lousy shots, the paper doesn't mind it!

Have you ever tried a bowling pins shoot for instant reaction and effect of being timed??
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Old August 10, 2011, 07:40 AM   #7
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It could be a sign that you need to start working out. I have seen my shooting improve as I have improved the muscle strength in my shoulders and arms.
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Old August 10, 2011, 08:23 AM   #8
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Try an experiment. In the comfort of your home, get out your favorite pistol and pretend you are at the range. Hold it up, sight down the sights, and pretend to shoot. Do this for the duration you would normally do at the range.

If you don't get the shakes at home, then that would leave me to believe the problem is either fatigue, dehydration, or recoil/sound related. I.E, something that is introduced at the range itself.

If you do get the shakes at home, that would lead me to believe you have a neuro/muscullar problem (either lack of strength or a medical issue).
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Old August 10, 2011, 02:55 PM   #9
g.willikers
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You might just be gripping the gun way too hard.
That will start a case of the shakes in the gun hand and arm.
Unless you're shaking elsewhere, too, that is.
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Old August 10, 2011, 08:48 PM   #10
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You may be gripping the handgun too hard or have muscles that are too tense. You may also not be breathing enough. Not breathing enough can cause muscle tremors. I would look at these possible causes to see what happens and STILL consult with your doctor.
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Old August 10, 2011, 09:07 PM   #11
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I notice that when dry-firing at home, I am much more stable than in real life at the range. I am convinced that it's a psychological phenomenon -- probably related to impending recoil and blast . It really disturbs me sometimes too, because I know I can do it without shaking, but my mind becomes my enemy.

I actually think this is one of the most compelling aspects of the shooting hobby. I'm really fighting against my own limitations, and every time I learn something that makes me better it feels like a real victory.

The comments on gripping too hard may be related too. I don't know if I dry-fire with a looser grip. I should do some experimentation...
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Old August 10, 2011, 10:14 PM   #12
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The grip should be like a firm handshake and not a death grip. The support hand also provides most of the grip pressure.
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Old August 10, 2011, 10:19 PM   #13
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Sounds like "chicken finger". You need to practice more, using less powerful ammo and/or better hearing protection. Also you might be waiting too long to take the shot.

Lifting weights wouldn't hurt, but I don't think that's the problem unless you are waiting a *really* long time before you shoot.
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Old August 11, 2011, 12:27 AM   #14
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This might be a matter of having to take your gun to the doctor's office to demonstrate the condition so he can make a proper diagnosis
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Old August 11, 2011, 01:10 AM   #15
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I had this happen once. I hadn't been shooting in a while, and was very shaky, even shooting a .22LR lever action. All it was was, apparently, was either dehydration or low blood sugar. I hadn't eaten or drank anything but water in about 14 hours. I had about a pint of OJ, more water, and ate a sandwich with a few carrots and I was cured.
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Old August 11, 2011, 01:24 AM   #16
PoorRichRichard
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I go to a public trap range that sells $2 beers. I shoot best between #2 and # 4. Before anyone get all Captain Crazy on me, let me state that I'm not breaking any rules, and that it's totally legal at this particular trap field. I'm not advocating drinking while shooting. This is just what works for me.
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Old August 11, 2011, 01:38 AM   #17
Nnobby45
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In my early fifties, after back surgery, I started lifting weights and doing other excercises as rehabilitation. (I joined a gym). Been doing it for over a decade, and I spend time on the bicycle, and then do weights--three times a week. Spa's nice, too.

It has made a noticeable difference, for the better,in my shooting. I'm definately steadier.
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Old August 11, 2011, 10:53 AM   #18
microman
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Quote:
You might just be gripping the gun way too hard.
This is the first thing that popped into my mind. I've had this
happen to me before at the range. Sometimes I am waiting
for the recoil and hold on a little too tight.
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Old August 11, 2011, 01:21 PM   #19
oo0juice0oo
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I already workout 5 days a week, I've been power lifting with some old Corps buddies for a little over a year now, so I don't think thats a problem. And I doubt it's dehydration because I have a strange obsession with water, so I drink 3-5 gallons a day (it's a lot easier than you'd think). I'll try relaxing my grip a bit (I grip it like my life depends on it), and I'm gonna do some extended dry fire exercises at home. Thanks for all of the replies fellas! We'll see if this works out the dysfunction in my function.
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Old August 11, 2011, 02:18 PM   #20
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Quote:
I have a strange obsession with water, so I drink 3-5 gallons a day
That is an extraordinary amount of water for one person to drink in a day. You should see a doctor and get a chemistry panel and urinalysis done to see if there is a medical reason linking your obsessive thirst and the shaking. If your GP finds nothing, s/he may want to refer you to an endocrinologist. Diabetes mellitus ("sugar" diabetes), kidney diseases, hyperadrenocorticism (Cushing's disease), diabetes insipidus, and other diseases should be evaluated with that much water intake. Although it seems counter-intuitive, with these and related diseases you can actually drink huge amounts of water and, because the kidneys are erroneously dumping more fluid that is appropriate, still be marginally dehydrated.
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Old August 11, 2011, 02:21 PM   #21
Nnobby45
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Quote:
I already workout 5 days a week, I've been power lifting with some old Corps buddies for a little over a year now, so I don't think thats a problem.
Well, do you shake when you're doing any other activities?
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Old August 11, 2011, 02:58 PM   #22
Brian48
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I find this only happens to me when I'm tired and start to grip the gun too hard to compensate. Relaxing and taking a short break usually helps.
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Old August 11, 2011, 03:04 PM   #23
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Ditto on the low blood sugar. I got the shakes the last time I went shooting. It was hot, I was sweating a lot and there i was, pointing my pistol down range, looking through the sights and watching my pistol shake. I put the gun down, took a short rest, and it kept happening. I can just tell when my blood sugar gets low, and that's all it was. Not something that happens all that often.
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Old August 11, 2011, 10:01 PM   #24
MikeNice81
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If you are drinking that much water, and shaking, get checked for diabetes.
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Old August 11, 2011, 10:40 PM   #25
Alaska444
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Actually, the most common cause of tremors is something simply called a benign tremor. They are more common the older we get. One of the other entities in this consideration is Parkinson's Disease. Doctors are trained to tell the difference between these two entities. Those are the two most common neurological causes of shakes.

Diabetes with low blood sugars from too much medicine, too much exercise or too little food would come with other symptoms such as sweating, heart racing as well as anxiety.

If the only time you exhibit these shakes is when shooting, I believe I would be hard pressed to know the cause of that as a physician. Medical causes for this should be evident in other activities as well. If it doesn't occur at other times as well, it may be a bad habit negatively reinforced over time and may be a symptom of recoil sensitivity. Lastly, there may be a possibility of peripheral nerve compression like carpal tunnel aggravated by the recoil. Doctors should be able to diagnose that by a physical exam, but in this condition I would also expect other symptoms at other times as well.

If it is only an isolated issue when shooting, then practice with dry fire at home might be a way to start to overcome this issue.

i hope this gives you some place to start.
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