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Old August 9, 2011, 09:51 AM   #26
LarryFlew
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I just hope that when I'm gone my wife doesn't sell stuff for what she thinks I paid for it.
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Old August 9, 2011, 02:02 PM   #27
GregInAtl
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I fount his thing at Home Depot, I think it will work perfectly and for $79
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Old August 9, 2011, 02:12 PM   #28
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You better buy that bench right now, 'cause if you don't, I'm gonna get it...
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Old August 9, 2011, 04:02 PM   #29
GregInAtl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Strangelove
You better buy that bench right now, 'cause if you don't, I'm gonna get it...
No problem, they got a big stack of about 10 of them stacked up behind the display
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Old August 9, 2011, 04:13 PM   #30
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You can build this for $60.

6ft x 3ft. I will say I reused the peg board portion. Other than that I made this table for $60. Well not including the beer traded to use my buddies tools.

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Old August 11, 2011, 06:08 PM   #31
gtullar
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Dear GregOnAtl

I,ve been reloading off and on for 30 years and have built many benches and storage areas over the years due to relocation. I see that this thread is dated however, if you've yet to begin, or for others not yet started, here is my experience.

PLAN FOR GROWTH! If you can... build your bench twice as large as you've planned and build lots and lots of shelves. Shelves will keep your work area workable and allow you easy viewing and access to all of your components and reloading data. A plastic portable table is NOT the way to go. It is BEST if your bench does not flex, bend or move. It will affected how your press performs. Try to mount the bench to the wall or build a continuous shelf spanning all four legs and weight it down with components or anything to keep the bench from moving.

I built an eight foot long bench and added three presses in a couple of years. This year I built a second loading bench, free stannding in the middle of the room, that is 4' x 6' on 4" x 6" legs. It has a 4' x 6' shelf 12" off the floor and it is full of heavy stuff... it's not moving! A forth press was added.

All this work area does not include a 3' x 3' top mounted to an old chest-of-drawers for gun cleaning and maintence.

And lots and lots and lots of shelves.

If you don't plan for growth while building your bench some day sooner than you think you will say to yourself... "I should have made this bigger!" Can you tell I love reloading and shooting!

Hope this helps someone during the planning stage.
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Old August 11, 2011, 06:15 PM   #32
gtullar
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Prefab?

As for buying a ready made bench vs buying lumber and building it yourself... do it yourself. Materials are cheaper and you can build a bigger bench tailored to your exact size, shape and need.

My Two Cents...
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Old August 15, 2011, 11:30 AM   #33
GregInAtl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by praetorian97
You can build this for $60.
Do you have any instuctions for building this? Some of the reloading books have instructions and a list of needed materials for building your own bench.
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Old August 15, 2011, 02:25 PM   #34
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Sam's and Costco sell a "gorilla" brand rack system that can be set up in two pieces side by side to give you an 8' long bench. Taking a sheet of 5/8" plywood and doubling it up and fastened to the rack, it is as solid as can be. If you want the top a little deeper. add a stock piece of kitchen counter on top of that (supporting the overhang from underneath). Each shelf will hold around 1200# - that's a lot of brass and bullets
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Old August 15, 2011, 02:48 PM   #35
GregInAtl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by praetorian97
Bolted. But you can bolt to a piece of wood/metal and clamp that to a table.
Just curious cause I was thinking of doing this. It seems that if you bolted the press to a piece of wood and then used clamps to clamp it to the table that the bolts would stick out the bottom side of the piece of wood and it woudn't lay level on the table.
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Old August 15, 2011, 02:49 PM   #36
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Sorry I don't. Here's what I did. Determine the bench size... bigger is always better, and cut a sheet of plywood (3/4 or 5/8 minimum) to that size/shape and lay it face down on the floor. Using 2 x 4's cut them to make a frame the same size as the plywood. Laying them on top of the plywood as a reference and to keep them square, screw them together through the ends. You are not attaching the frame to the plywood just making the frame. ALWAYS USE SCREWS NOT NAILS. If you make a mistake you can unscrew it and redo it. I always buy 50% more 2 x 4's than I think I need... enough said!

Determine your bench height, I stand to reload and use a Strong Mount under my press and my benches are 39 1/2" tall. I hate bending over to work on my guns or to do anything. Higher is better! Using 4 x 4's or 4 x 6's for legs, cut them to your desired bench height less the thickness of the plywood (39 1/2 less 3/4 equals 38 3/4). Place them standing up INSIDE the four corners of your frame and screw them together, through the frame into the 4 x 6's. I use a second drill to create a pilot hole for each screw before screwing two pieces together. Mark your wood, drill pilot holes and start your screws before fastening the two pieces together. It will make the task easier.

Measure and cut 2 x 4's to build a second frame for the inside of the four legs to be used as a full size shelf. Unlike the top frame, this frame will have two longer sides spaning from outer leg to outer leg, and two shorter sides fastened between them. This should be anchored so it is positioned at least 12" from the floor when the assembly is turned right side up. This is so you can store ammo cans on the floor, under the shelf. Now flip the frame and legs over so everything is upright.

Depending on the size of your bench you may need some support 2 x 4's inside the two frames before you fasten the plywood. I used metal hangers (Home Depot). They are cheap, strong and easy to install. Just measure the longest inside dimension of each frame and cut 2 x 4's, attached the hangers and insert the 2 x 4's. You can then screw the hangers to the 2 x 4's. Remember, everything needs to be flush to the tops of the frames because you want the plywood to lye flat.

Cut a second sheet of plywood for the shelf so that you can slide it between two of the legs. Fasten it with screws into the lower frame and support members. Now place the top plywood on the top frame an attach in the same manor. That's it!

If you can push your bench up against a wall it's best to anchor the bench to the wall. Find the studs, drill pilot holes through the top frame and let-her-rip!

If you can find a helper to hold or keep a board from moving during assembly you may prevent your children from learning new words... enough said!

Good Luck.
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Old August 15, 2011, 02:56 PM   #37
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Quote:
The first thing I wanted to find out is how much room is needed and how messy is this.
How much room is needed depends entirely upon what set-up you use: My brother loaded nearly 3,000 9mm rounds since last November with a Lee hand press, and kept everything in two shoe boxes under his couch...

.... that said, he is getting into loading other calibers, so we built him a very nice bench in his basement this week, for less than 90 bucks. 8 feet long, 3 feet deep, with shelves and pegboard. It is made from 2x6's and is secured to the basement walls with PL400 and concrete screws- he can do all the case-forming he wants and not rock his scale..... it's as solid as the basement walls themselves........

Quote:
how messy is this
How messy are YOU?

Quote:
You won't save any money. It's a lie. It's an excuse used to convince the wife to let you start reloading. You'll have lots of fun, but, you will NOT save any money. For starters, just add up the cost of everything that was just recommended.

IF you shoot much, the equipment will pay for itself quickly in savings on ammo- I did the math awhile back and a Lee 50th Anniversary Kit would pay for itself in 300 rounds of 30-06 or .270 WIN ........

But I have found I did not save any money: I still shoot myself broke. I just get to shoot a whole lot more doing it. It is a sickness, and I have it bad: I have bullets and dies for calibers I don't even own ...... yet.
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Old August 16, 2011, 04:17 PM   #38
GregInAtl
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But I have found I did not save any money: I still shoot myself broke. I just get to shoot a whole lot more doing it
Everybody says that. I found a pretty good set of instructions on the web that should make this pretty easy.

http://www.scottfam.us/useful/Workbe...structions.pdf

yields:

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Last edited by GregInAtl; August 16, 2011 at 04:23 PM.
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