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Old July 16, 2011, 01:48 PM   #1
hogdogs
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Recipe Thread

To begin with we are going to start 2 new threads. One will be a recipe thread and the other will be a meat handling thread.
The meat handling thread will be for every tip or question regarding from the time the game is down to when it is thawed...

The recipe thread is everything we do from thawed to plate... I know there is a bunch of folks with way more skill in both subjects than me and I have learned a bunch over the years from forums from these folks.

Each will be a single thread and each submission will be done as "replies".

With plenty of use, these will become a string that might have some confusion and frustration but with enuff activity, Art can go to the "higher ups" and request they be converted to a subsection as you see in General discussion regarding the "Photo Contest" section or the Law and Civil rights regarding the old "legal and political" which happens to be locked but you can view the old threads.

If we don't get a decent amount of traffic and activity, we can easily kill these stickys off without getting others involved...

Brent

Last edited by hogdogs; July 16, 2011 at 05:02 PM.
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Old July 16, 2011, 01:56 PM   #2
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Feral pork done easy...

One tip I have is for thick cuts like hams and roasts...

Stuff it...
Take a knife such as fillet or boning and stab holes from 2-4 inches deep with a little wiggle to make these about 1-1.5 inches wide.

In these you can pack many ingredients...
I have used fat back bacon for keeping it juicy, massive pieces of garlic, pieces of juicy onion, cubes of various citrus including oranges, grapefruit and lemon as well as apple chunks.

I have made up a blend of herbs and spices and tossed these tidbits in it before packing into the stab wounds with excellent results.

If you are using herbs, DON'T forget the married flavor of the sage... Sage is where "sau(pork/pig)-sage" comes from.

Very soon I will resubmit my personal "stuffed pig' recipe/method.

Brent
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Old July 16, 2011, 07:22 PM   #3
m17s_guy
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game birds

i take my breast of (insert bird here) and butterfly it, so that it looks like a little turkey breast taco, and stuff in some prosciutto, a small piece of provolone, some sage, and a little ground garlic, wrap in more prosciutto and then bread it with some breadcrumbs before baking in the oven. makes a great main course.

the only bird this is almost impossible to do this with is dove, because the breast is so small, you cant get the flavor in the meat before you are done cooking
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Old July 16, 2011, 08:49 PM   #4
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Fear not the bacon blanket with game meat. It goes particularly well with venison and feral pig meat loaf. Use a raised loaf bottom so it doesn't sit in the drippings.

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Old July 16, 2011, 09:47 PM   #5
Chuck Dye
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CARBONNADES


Flour for dredging
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 pounds boneless chuck, cut into 1-inch cubes
¼ cup salad oil

6 medium onions, sliced
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1 12-ounce bottle or can of beer
1 tablespoon chopped parsley
1 bay leaf
¼ teaspoon thyme


1. Combine flour, salt, and pepper. Dredge the meat in the seasoned flour.
2. Heat oil in a skillet. Add onion slices and garlic and cook until tender but not brown. Remove the onions from the skillet.
3. Add the meat and brown on all sides, adding a little more oil if necessary. Return the onions to the skillet.
4. Add the remaining ingredients.
5. Cover and cook over low heat until the meat is tender, about 1¼ hour. Serve hot with boiled potatoes, noodles, or spaetzel.

I always find myself using a good deal more than 12 ounces of beer.

The choice of beer will make quite a difference. I generally use mildly hopped microbrewed ales, such as nut brown ale, for mildly flavored meat such as elk, and venture into more strongly flavored brews for more strongly flavored meat.

The recipe also works for fowl.

The cooks I learned about spaetzel from all mushed their dough out to ¼ to ½ inch thick on a cutting board and then sliced it into strips about as wide as they were thick. For carbonnades, I omit the parsley and other decorations.
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Old July 16, 2011, 11:24 PM   #6
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fisherman, That "quilt" looks like the perfect blanket... Now I need a raised loaf pan... What is up with the "cloth" under the bacon?

Chuck, That recipe sounds great even for domestic meats.... 'Cept mine will have fresh "jail-ee-pee-no" peppers and possible a snot load of 'shrooms too!

Pics would help... nevermind... on second thought you might want to keep them to yerself!

Brent
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Old July 17, 2011, 12:39 AM   #7
Chuck Dye
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ALL recipes, except those baking recipes that rely on stoichiometry for success, are mere jumping off points for real cooks.

Another recipe-less favorite is to bone out a shoulder or ham and stuff the cavity. For pork or venison* I like a blend of wild rice, or Thai red rice, or Thai black rice, or all three, with brandy soaked dried fruits and suitable herbs and spices. Or just the brandied fruits. This can be roasted in the traditional manner or in a tightly covered roasting pan with a sufficient quantity of a suitable liquid (wine, liquor, or broth.) If the cavity is stuffed with only the brandied dried fruit the stuffing can be removed when the roast is done, blended to a puree, and reduced to a sauce for the table.

*Correctly, venison is the meat of any game taken in the hunt, not just deer.
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Old July 17, 2011, 12:48 AM   #8
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WRONG TIME OF NIGHT... Chuck!

This thread is gonna be blamed for many drool ruined keyboards, growlin' stomachs and all sorts of tongue gone wild injuries... I can see it now!

Brent
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Old July 17, 2011, 08:42 AM   #9
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Deer neck sandwiches!

Take one deer neck roast and put it in a crockpot, with some Cavanders greek seasoning sprinkle moderatley to kinda cover it lighly with the seasoning. Then add one cup of your favorite BBQ sauce by pouring it over the roast, (we sometimes add onions and other vegetables like celery, or small pieces of carrots etc.) Set the crockpot to medium heat and cook until the bone will easily come out of the roast. Shread the meat into a large cast iron frying pan that you can cover with a lid, Add chopped vegies, and more BBQ sauce and stir until it simmers together. If I add onions at this point, I usually simmer until onions are clear, an adding sauce until its good and juicy.
Put it on an onoin-bun dellllllllicous!!!
This recipe is easy for us men who wants cool pulled meat sandwiches, and like eating the deer necks!! enjoy!
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Old July 17, 2011, 10:46 AM   #10
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Italian Sausage

Thanks, Brent and Art. I have been wondering about just such a thread. Here's my almost famous Italian sausage recipe:

Mike’s Spicy Italian Fennel Venison/Pork Sausage

Yep, it’s pretty spicy!

INGREDIENTS:

8 lbs of meat, preferably pork shoulder and venison or wild pork in equal parts. Bone and cut into chunks around one inch.
3 tbs salt, some say iodine free is best
4 tsp fresh ground black pepper
1 tsp crushed red pepper
5 tbs minced broadleaf parsley-I used most of a small bundle with the stems removed
8 tbs crushed fennel seeds
1 head of garlic, 8 cloves or so

PREPARATION:

Crisp fennel seeds in a 325 degree oven for 10 minutes.

Chop garlic, toasted fennel seeds and parsley in a chopper or food processor. Thoroughly blend with meat chunks in a large bowl and all other spices in a large bowl. Cover and refrigerate for 12 hours.

Grind using the coarse/large plate of your food grinder. Thoroughly mix a second time and fry in butter or olive oil to verify proper seasoning.
Attached Images
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File Type: jpg 009.jpg (231.7 KB, 99 views)
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Old July 17, 2011, 11:02 AM   #11
hogdogs
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That sausage does sound good and easier than I ever thought...

I never buy iodized salt... First off... It "cannot be used for bait rep" regarding saltwater baits and rigging.

But I figure I will end up with enuff iodine in my diet no matter what...

Brent
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Old July 17, 2011, 11:03 AM   #12
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Nuther "Top Secret" Recipe

Ya'll won't tell, will you?

Mike’s Italian Sausage Hearty Tomato Lasagna


Ingredients:


2 tbs olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped fine
6 medium cloves garlic, minced or pressed
1 lb Italian sausage-removed from casings (I like my Italian fennel recipe, of course.)
¼ cup heavy cream
28 ozs canned tomato puree
28 ozs canned diced tomatoes
15 ozs ricotta cheese
2 ½ ozs grated parmesan cheese
1/2 tbs Italian seasoning herb blend-may use fresh herbs if available
1 tbs dried basil
1 large egg, lightly beaten
½ tsp table salt
½ tsp fresh ground black pepper
12 no-boil lasagna noodles
16 ozs shredded mozzarella cheese, whole milk or skim



Cooking Directions



Pre-heat oven to 375

Heat oil in large deep cast-iron skillet over medium heat, add onion and garlic. Cook and stir until softened-about 2-4 minutes. Add herb blend and cook/stir an additional 2-4 minutes. Increase heat to medium high and add sausage and cook, stirring and breaking up meat with wooden spoon. Cook until pink is gone but not brown-about 5-8 minutes. Add cream and simmer, stirring occasionally until liquid evaporates-about 5-8 minutes. Transfer meat mixture to saucepan and add tomatoes and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat and simmer slowly until flavors are blended, at least 30 minutes. Set sauce aside.

Mix ricotta, 1 cup Parmesan, basil, egg, salt and pepper in medium bowl with fork until well blended and creamy; set aside.

Coat bottom of 9X13 baking dish with ¼ cup meat sauce. Place 3 noodles on top of sauce. Drop 3 tbs ricotta mixture down center of each noodle. Spread evenly. Sprinkle evenly with 1 cup shredded mozzarella. Spoon 1 ½ cups meat sauce evenly over cheese.

Repeat layering of noodles, ricotta, mozzarella and sauce two more times. Place three remaining noodles on top of sauce, spread remaining sauce over noodles, sprinkle with remaining cup mozzarella, then with remaining ¼ cup Parmesan. Lightly spray a large sheet of foil with nonstick cooking spray and cover lasagna. Bake 30 minutes, remove foil. Return to oven and bake until sauce is bubbling and noodles are soft, about 30 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool about 10 minutes before serving.



This recipe borrows heavily from one by Cook’s Illustrated on Yahoo! Food website but I made numerous substitutions and a few corrections so I decided to write a recipe I could use.
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Old July 17, 2011, 11:21 AM   #13
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Chuck, have you tried your carbonnades with broth instead of beer? I'm allergic to beer but it sounds too good not to try.
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Old July 17, 2011, 11:46 AM   #14
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It would never have occurred to me to make carbonnades with anything but beer or ale but, as I wrote above, all recipes are merely jumping off points for real cooks. Making a good stock is as easily done with game as with domestic meats. I might try a fair bit of wine with the broth, selecting a wine and quantity that will compliment, not overpower, the meat. (I was once served elk chili with a sauce that so overpowered the elk that the meat could have been almost anything. Why waste elk so?) If you try carbonnades without beer or ale and it works for you, let us know.
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Old July 17, 2011, 12:15 PM   #15
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I believe I will, thanks. I wish I had more freezer space to save hog bones for making stock. Guess I could put a big stock pot or two on the stove while I'm processing and make it at the same time. I use broth when steaming rice or cooking beans in a crock pot as well as stews, should work OK here. I like the wine idea as well. I've been known to "wash out" a pasta sauce jar with wine or add it to a homemade sauce but haven't tried it for much else.
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Old July 17, 2011, 12:20 PM   #16
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Quote:
fisherman, That "quilt" looks like the perfect blanket... Now I need a raised loaf pan... What is up with the "cloth" under the bacon?
I haven't taken pictures of my bacon blanket, so I pilfered that off goggle images. I think the cloth is a "press-form" with a waxy side.

The bacon blanket is the cheap version of how many force meat terrines are wrapped in caul fat.
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Old July 17, 2011, 07:08 PM   #17
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My grandfather had built a neat little barbecue pit, and I usually had a bunch of deer meat...

So: Barbecued venison ham.

I used the cheapest storebought barbecue sauce I could find, and then added various spices as the mood struck. Plus, Lea&Perrins "Whigglewiggie", butter, a little water, maybe. Always different, but never wrong. Absolutely no salt anywhere along the way.

I'd start with a high heat, with sauce slathered on and turning every five minutes or so--tongs, no fork--until the sauce was glazed. Then, spread the coals (mesquite and live oak plus a little charcoal) to about the equivalent of a 300 degree oven or a bit less.

I'd do a turn-and-baste every twenty minutes or so. Budweiser as needed to keep the cook lubricated but not too well-oiled.

Somewhere around four hours and it would be right at well done, but still quite juicy. That's why the no-salt and use of tongs: Keeps the moisture in.

Had a bunch of these Saturday Sessions. Lots of picking and grinning going on. A fair amount of Sangria, too. I had a standing offer to any "newbie" that if they didn't like the deer meat, I'd cook a tenderloin steak for them. Never did have to make good on that offer.
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Old July 17, 2011, 08:41 PM   #18
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Smoked Venison Backstrap and Loins....
Brine the meat, smoke, and slice.

Brine is a simple formula, 1-1-1, one gallon of water, one cup of sugar, one cup of salt. Mix it together and soak the meat for 24-to-48 hours. Drain the meat and let it remain on a cookie sheet in the refrigerator for another 24 hours. This process forms a dried film on the outside of the meat and seals in the moisture. Smoking was about 4 hours at 170 degrees. The brine process eliminates need for a rub, and has a pleasant light salted taste.




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Old July 17, 2011, 08:51 PM   #19
phil mcwilliam
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I was once treated to Eland backstraps from an old Bull I'd shot in South Africa. The guide had cut the backstraps into 1 inch cubes, lightly seasoned with ground coffee & then flash fried for 40 seconds in a wok at high heat. Melt in your mouth delicious. Served on toothpicks, accompanied with cold beer.
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Old July 18, 2011, 02:30 PM   #20
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you can use corn husks as a sausage casing instead of regular casing.



after years and years of smoking and barbequeing, smoking and barbequeing, smoking and barbequeing...ect, I have started to craving a different style of cooking, so, I am in the process of building an outdoor brick oven and I am gonna get into some old-world style stuff. And of course pizza!!! I will post later on when I am finished and let yall know how it goes.

BTW excellent Idea on the Threads.



And WOOOOHOOOO @ the bacon blanket
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Old July 18, 2011, 05:54 PM   #21
phil mcwilliam
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Giraffe Biltong

Attachment 72081I tried this a few weeks ago in Zimbabwe after a mate had taken a Giraffe on a plains game hunt.
We used about half of one backstrap or about 30 pounds of meat. Remove as much sinew & fat as possible. Cut the meat into half inch strips along the grain. Dip each strip into vinegar before layering in a large plastic wash tub. On top of each layer sprinkle with salt, pepper, ground coriander & spice mix. Special biltong spice mix is available, but I think any spice mix will work.
We had the layers about 8 inches thick when we were finished this step.
Leave the meat to marinate for 24 hours, turning/mixing by hand every 6 hours.
We then hung the meat to dry & were chewing on giraffe jerky 4 days later. A longer drying time may be required but we had dry weather with a light breeze & were keen to try the giraffe.
We had giraffe liver, fried in butter, seasoned with salt & pepper ,the afternoon it was shot, & we had fillet steaks the following night.
After the skinners & helpers were done butchering the animal on the site it was shot, all that was left was a blood stain & the stomach contents- all the approximate 2,000 pounds of animal was used including internal organs such as stomach & intestines.
Giraffe actually tastes nice.
Hopefully the attachment shows the layers of meat marinating in a plastic wash tub.

Last edited by phil mcwilliam; July 22, 2011 at 09:16 PM.
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Old July 23, 2011, 07:31 AM   #22
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Butterfly backstaps!

Here's another hooligan1 fave,,,, Butterfly deer backstraps on the grill.

1. take a deer backstrap and cut it into butterflies; make 1 inch cuts not quite through the strap, then make the next cut all the way through.
2. Stuff butterfly with japaleno rings, and season with Cavanders Greek Seasoning, lightly to taste.
3. wrap a stip of bacon around the edge as to hold the contents inside the butterfly, and secure with a toothpick.
4. over a hot direct-heat fire, ( I also use apple chips for smoke but any good smoke will do nicely) I lay the fillets on the grill and turn them only after they've browned on the bottoms.
5. I usually cook them until the bacon is pretty well done but I also take care not to "overcook" them.
6. they always please the crowd and go super with cold suds!!
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Old August 4, 2011, 02:38 AM   #23
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Antelope with Wild Rice

I've been wanting to post this for a while, but I don't cook by any means that really allows proper measurements. (Throw stuff in the pot, until it's delicious.) So, I couldn't find a proper way to do so. But, I'll toss it out there...

One note:
Any "Wild Rice" blend is good enough, but I prefer 'Rice Select' brand "Royal Blend". It has more Indian Rice ("Wild Rice" - it's actually a grass seed), than other brands. Straight wild rice is horribly expensive, and not recommended.

Here's the basic recipe:
Antelope meat - about 1-1.5 lb, slice into 3/8" thick medallions
Wild Rice
1 stick Butter - 1/4 cup. No margarine.
1 small Shallot - thinly sliced, or diced. You can substitute with diced onion and garlic (about 1/8 cup, total, 65% onion, 35% garlic).
Mushrooms - whatever you prefer - diced.
Salt and Pepper - to taste.
Water
Dinner Rolls - The good, old fashioned, yeastie kind. No potato rolls.

Slap the slab o' butter down in a 10" skillet, and get it melting (cut it up, if you're in a hurry). Sear both sides of the Antelope meat, while the butter is melting (don't cook it - just sear it). Set the meat aside.

Add a little salt and pepper. Cook the mushrooms and shallot (or onion/garlic) in the butter for about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat, add meat back into pan, and take a rough guess at how much water and rice you need, to get the pan filled. Add water and rice. Bring to boil. Reduce heat. Simmer until desired thickness and doneness (may need to be covered, in some climates). Season with salt and pepper, if needed.

Serve however you wish, but I like stuffing the buttery mixture into "mini bread bowls" made from home made dinner rolls. My wife prefers simply dipping the rolls into the mixture, and eating the Antelope separately. (She loves properly cared-for Antelope flesh.)
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Old August 4, 2011, 09:55 AM   #24
hogdogs
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Rabbit Salad Samiches...

If you run out of ways to eat Bugs Bunny or just want a different recipe...

Rabbit Salad Samich...
Take some boiled and deboned rabbit meat and plop in the food processor and give it a whirl or 3...

When chopped/shredded to a stringy consistency, put in a mixing bowl.

Add what ever you want but I like celery, onion, salt and pepper like you are making chicken salad or tuna salad.

Now add the mayo to desired stiffness of mixture.
Slop on bread and chomp down...

Now blow away the first person who asks what yer eating with what ever snarky statements you can think of!


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Old August 4, 2011, 02:10 PM   #25
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Simple cream based pasta with Cottontail

After skinning, gutting and cleaning the Cottontails, soak them in some salt water overnight in the fridge.

After the soak, boil rabbits for 2-3 hours (longer for larger rabbits- my guys were small, so 2 hours was fine). The meat will basically be falling off the bone.

Boil up some fettucini or linguini, drain and set aside. This can be done simultaneously while preparing the sauce.

Separate meat from bone.

Bring saucepan to a medium heat and brown a spoon full of crushed garlic with some olive oil and add pepper to taste. No salt! I'll tell you why at the end of post.

Add rabbit and brown a bit more.

Shoot with a splash of wine- white or red... hell, beer will do fine as well.

Add some heavy whipping cream. Mix it up. Should start to bubble up fairly fast.

Add a handful of freshly grated parmesan cheese- you can find the fresh pre-grated stuff at your local supermarket, or use the canned crap>>> your sauce will come out better with the fresh stuff.

Push to one side of the saucepan and add add pasta, toss and scoop into bowl or onto a plate.

As a side, I like to serve with fresh grown tomatoes from my yard cut into slices with salt, pepper, granulated garlic, and bit of red wine vinegar.

Enjoy with a glass of wine (or bottle in my case...) or a frosty glass of your favorite beer!

As I stated before, do not add salt to the pasta until after you have tasted it! Two reasons why: First, the rabbit was soaked in saltwater overnight, and will retain some of the salt flavoring in the meat. Second, parmesan cheese (both fresh grated and canned) has a considerable amount of salt in it.

You can always add more salt to the dish, but you can never take any out!

Also, if you have extra Cottontail meat that you don't use in the pasta, lightly coat with olive oil, cover and refrigerate. The cooked meat should hold for 10 to 12 days in the fridge.

This is just a simple base recipe. Feel free to add/experiment! Any and all feedback would be greatly appreciated!

Afterthought: For those who dig on the seafood, throw some baby clams up in the mix.
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