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Old June 16, 2011, 05:46 PM   #1
hkusp45c_shooter
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.454 Casull loading question

I bought a RSRH Alaskan in the .454 casull a few weeks ago and now its time to start loading for it. I bought some of the hornady 250 grain xtp bullets to try first loading them in the 454 brass. I have the hornady 8th edition reloading manual. would it be better to use the standard 45 colt load data or should i use the (ruger only) 45 colt data. Using the standard data would all the empty space in the brass be bad or dangerous. I would most likely be using herco the manual states 8 grs. Or would using the (ruger only) with 20 grs of 2400 hundred be better.
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Old June 16, 2011, 07:31 PM   #2
SRH78
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The lighter loads also leave a lot of room in 45 Colt brass so I can't see the little bit of extra space being an issue, especially since your SRH is much stronger than the guns that standard 45 Colt loads are designed for. Imo, it just comes down to what you want to shoot.
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Old June 16, 2011, 08:10 PM   #3
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I prefer H110 with the 454, it always gives great performance with any weight of bullet. I've used it with 240gr all the way up to 405gr bullets and it's worked great.

If your worried about the open space you can alway use a filler like cream of wheat or malt o meal.
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Old June 16, 2011, 08:47 PM   #4
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CAUTION: The following post includes loading data beyond currently published maximums for this cartridge. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Neither the writer, The Firing Line, nor the staff of TFL assume any liability for any damage or injury resulting from use of this information.

Use 2400 and no worries about filler needed. I use 18.5 with a 300 XTP and it does great in my RedHawk 45 Colt.
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Old June 16, 2011, 09:36 PM   #5
hkusp45c_shooter
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ive loaded moslty low power 45 acp rounds and a few 44 mags when i had that gun. this willl be my first take at a powerhouse cartridge like the 454. i did not know if the empty space was bad. i plan on starting out with the 250 grain xtps then work up to the 300 grain xtp mags.
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Old June 16, 2011, 10:01 PM   #6
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CERTAIN POWDERS are dangerous with reduced loads

Certain powders are NEVER to be used for reduced loads. They are the slower powders and if they don't generate sufficient pressure are apt to have pressure spikes. These are completely unpredicatble and have given ballisticians fits for decades because they cannot be reliably reproduce in the laboratory. Someday, perhaps. They are still working on it.

H110 is probably the most well-known of the powders not to reduce. H110 is a really great powder, but NOT for reduced loads (according to its maker).

The advantage of the slower powders is that they (when properly pressurized) burn for a long time, impelling the bullet with steady pressure and less felt recoil. Faster powders don't have the burn time to reach high velocities unless you use a lot of them, which produces higher pressure over a shorter time than a slower powder, higher peak pressure to achieve the same velocity and more felt recoil.

The maker of H110 advises to not reduce the maximum load any more than 3%. Check their web site.

If you want moderate velocities, use faster powders. This is why we tailor loads and pick powders that 1) give enough pressure to expand the brass to seal against the chamber walls, 2) give enough pressure that the powder burns as it is supposed to, 3) produces enough pressure for a long enough time to ensure the bullet does leave the barrel and 4) produces pressure below that which will damage the gun or the shooter.

For every desired velocity, there is a powder that balances peak pressure and burn time for optimal efficiency. The handloader's task is to find it. It keeps those who are of a personality for it interested. Kind of like searching for the Holy Grail or working out a puzzle. A really LOUD puzzle.

Good Luck. Be safe always, all ways.

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Last edited by Lost Sheep; June 16, 2011 at 10:08 PM.
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Old June 16, 2011, 10:04 PM   #7
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I have a Freedom arms .454 for the last 20 years and I have never used anything but H110.
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