The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Dave McCracken Memorial Shotgun Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old June 20, 2011, 05:04 PM   #1
.300 Weatherby Mag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 6, 2008
Posts: 1,777
I hate 23s and 24s!!!

I would sure be nice if I could break through and shoot a 25 on the skeet range!!! Getting this close is driving me nuts!!! Any tips Zippy???
.300 Weatherby Mag is offline  
Old June 20, 2011, 07:37 PM   #2
oneounceload
Junior member
 
Join Date: April 18, 2008
Location: N. Central Florida
Posts: 8,518
Skeet and trap are about not trying to miss; therefore making sure your foot placement, muscle memory/movement, hold off the house, etc., are consistent.

This differs from sporting clays where the object is try and hit as many as possible and hold points, etc. are all different.

Do you have any particular station that is the nemesis, or is it a random situation?
oneounceload is offline  
Old June 20, 2011, 07:44 PM   #3
.300 Weatherby Mag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 6, 2008
Posts: 1,777
Low 6 is my nemesis at the current time...
.300 Weatherby Mag is offline  
Old June 20, 2011, 08:16 PM   #4
zippy13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2008
Location: SoCal
Posts: 6,416
.300 Weatherby Mag, I feel your pain.

What are you missing -- consistently the same target(s), or random ones? There are a lot of common mistakes that are hard to pin down without watching you shoot. And, there are tricks that some folks don't share.

Skeet is a game of inches:
Where do you put your feet for each target presentation?
Is your mount consistent? Does your gun REALLY FIT you? Flinching?
Where is your hold point for each presentation -- how do you adjust for wind?
Do you have a consistent look-point, pick-up point, lead, and smooth follow through with each target?
Have you experimented with all of the variables, at each presentation, to lean what works best for you?

Many shooters get their gun above the flight of the target, so they lose sight of it. They respond by raising their head off of the stock, not lowering the gun. It's a great way to miss a target and get whacked in the face as a bonus. I don't know how many shooters go straight until they get to Station 8, and then their wheels come off.

Do you shoot with folks who are better shooters than you are? You're not going to learn much in a blind-leaning-the-blind scenario. Have you been to any clinics, or watched videos? My scores improved after I buddied-up with a first team All-American.
zippy13 is offline  
Old June 20, 2011, 08:23 PM   #5
krimmie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 11, 2007
Location: S. Florida
Posts: 175
Quote:
Low 6 is my nemesis at the current time...
The single or double? It kept me from a few 25's also...I was missing the low 6 double and found I was hurrying it to get back to the high. In my case, I took my time with it and the 25's started coming. Unfortunately, that was right before duck season, and after a 3 month break from clays, I have developed more problem targets
krimmie is offline  
Old June 21, 2011, 01:17 AM   #6
zippy13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2008
Location: SoCal
Posts: 6,416
Ah, Low 6. Sorry it missed it earlier, I was writing my reply when you described your problem puppy. I've seen a lot of 100-straights lost on the fourth round at Station 6.

Low 6, like its opposite number High 2, is one of the fastest birds on the field. Because you have to be quick, you have less time to make corrections. My first suggestion for station 6 is to give yourself a slight advantage by standing as far from the low house window as possible. If you're not already there, try crowding the left side of the shooting station. I prefer the left front corner. Trap shooters are expected to stand in the middle of the box, but Skeet shooters can stand with "any part of both feet within the boundaries of the designated shooting station." As long as you feet are barely in the box, you're legal. Give yourself as much distance (and time) as possible. Once you get in the advantageous location, you'll have to fine tune your exact foot position. Some suggest starting with you belly pointed at the window (RH shooters).

Most shooter soon learn the proper lead at Low 6, the problem areas seem to be.
  • Anticipating (jumping) the target: Nervousness can and does happen at Station 6. Wait until you see the target before you make your move. Otherwise, a slow pull will kill you. It's easy to develop bad habits if you use a voice activated system and start your swing just as you call for the target.
  • Holding too high: It's easy to get over Low 6 if you hold too high. If your gun is below the target, you can always come up to it, but it your over it, you're out of luck. Low 6 gives you little time to make corrections. As you're waiting for your turn to shoot, observe the bird's path and hold below it (do this for all targets).
  • Look and hold points: Like High 2, it takes some experience to learn what hold and look points work best for your vision and reflexes. As I've gotten older, I hold a lot farther out than I did 40 years ago.
  • Consistency: Attempt to break the bird at the same spot every time. The gun and ammo are designed to break the target best right over the center stake.
  • Follow through: Keep you head down and follow through, especially on the doubles. Short swinging the low target is a good way to Dutch a pair at 6.
If your club allows, why not spend some time just at Station 6? I recall when Olympic Champ Kim Rhode was about 11, or 12, her dad had her spend all afternoon on Station 5 -- probably a 100 targets at that one station.
zippy13 is offline  
Old June 21, 2011, 02:46 AM   #7
.300 Weatherby Mag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 6, 2008
Posts: 1,777
Zippy,

Thanks for all the advice... My father was a A shooter with a 20 gauge, B shooter with a 12 and I do not recall his classifications with a .410 and 28 but he's a good shot... We don't get to shoot as much as I'd like but he is why I shoot as well as a I do.. The one issue is that he's a lefty and its difficult to learn some of the stuff from him because of that...
.300 Weatherby Mag is offline  
Old June 21, 2011, 10:31 AM   #8
BigJimP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 23, 2005
Posts: 11,420
+1 on zippy's idea to go out to a problem station ....and groove your hold point, vision focus point, foot position, etc ....until you can solidly break 10 of 10 on that station ( before they get to the center stake).

Get a buddy to help you ...he or she might see things that you can't see...vs going out and using a voice pull to pull your own - and grade your breaks / and your shots.

My hunch is its more of a confidence thing than anything else ...and once it gets in your head as a miss ...its hard to get back on track (at least for me). You have to get to that Zen place ....quiet and calm confidence ...its already dead attitude ( no doubt at all ) ...
BigJimP is offline  
Old June 21, 2011, 02:28 PM   #9
.300 Weatherby Mag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 6, 2008
Posts: 1,777
Wind was blowing hard today... Wasn't happy with my scores of 22 and 23 but I hit every low on station 6!! The high six was the issue today... The way the wind blows through this range, it makes the high house do some weird things...
.300 Weatherby Mag is offline  
Old June 21, 2011, 06:19 PM   #10
LSnSC
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 5, 2010
Posts: 514
High 2 was my nemesis for a while. If I dont have time to shoot a hundred, I'll shoot 50 on High 2, 3, 4, 5 and low 6.
LSnSC is offline  
Old June 21, 2011, 08:54 PM   #11
PJR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 31, 2000
Posts: 1,127
I like 23s and 24s better than 21s and 22s.

Any problems I've had with low 6 are directly caused by a hold point too close to the house.
PJR is offline  
Old June 21, 2011, 11:25 PM   #12
30-30remchester
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 18, 2009
Location: mountains of colorado
Posts: 977
I have the destiction of being the only man in our club to get a tripple at skeet. I was shooting my double from the low house and broke both of the clays with one shot, not unusal at all, but the unlucky morning dove that was occupying the same patch of sky at the same time made it a triple. My shooting partner at the time was a game warden and it was 2 days before dove season. He informed me that was my ONE freebie, and dont count on any compasion on any other violations I might commit.
30-30remchester is offline  
Old June 21, 2011, 11:29 PM   #13
.300 Weatherby Mag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 6, 2008
Posts: 1,777
Quote:
I have the destiction of being the only man in our club to get a tripple at skeet. I was shooting my double from the low house and broke both of the clays with one shot, not unusal at all, but the unlucky morning dove that was occupying the same patch of sky at the same time made it a triple. My shooting partner at the time was a game warden and it was 2 days before dove season. He informed me that was my ONE freebie, and dont count on any compasion on any other violations I might commit.
When I called pull on the Station 6 double.... I get the low house then a suicidal bird flew right through my line of sight and I hesitated and didn't pull the trigger on the high till it was way too late...
.300 Weatherby Mag is offline  
Old June 22, 2011, 07:12 AM   #14
Rugerismisticness
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 22, 2010
Posts: 909
They're all nemisises, I really need to either
1. Focus deliberatly on each bird
or
2, run through the stations as fast as I can

There is no happy medium for me, I'll usually run 23/24s with that.
Shooting in squads is a different animal all together, it takes darn near 45minutes to shoot one round. I usually shoot 24/25 with this kind of time limit. I also note that getting distracted between stations helps my score, maybe because it smoothly passes the time and relieves any anxiety.
Rugerismisticness is offline  
Old June 22, 2011, 08:20 AM   #15
zippy13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2008
Location: SoCal
Posts: 6,416
"Shooting in squads is a different animal all together, it takes darn near 45minutes to shoot one round."
Yikes, I can see how you'd lose concentration under that scenario. A round of Skeet, with a 5 member squad, should take about 20 to 25 minutes. In competition, a squad is expected to shoot 100-targets in 90-minutes. It sounds like you're shooting with undisciplined and/or inexperienced folks.
zippy13 is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.09265 seconds with 9 queries