The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting > Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old May 26, 2011, 11:02 AM   #1
south.texas.dead.I
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 5, 2011
Posts: 262
Lee pro 220v furnace trouble!!

I'm having some trouble wiring this, I got a 250v extension cord with 4 lead ins they are red back white and green. The pot has 3 which are brown blue and green. Tge green to green for grounding. Now the lee tech said that the white from the extension is supposed to be ignored and red was hot black is cold and greens are ground. The guy from home depot and lady from general electric said that black and Rex are tied in togethor as hot, white is cold which ties into the blue and green to green are grounding. Can someone who got this pot help me out.


iPhone using Tapatalk
south.texas.dead.I is offline  
Old May 26, 2011, 11:11 AM   #2
Hawg Haggen
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 8, 2007
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 11,429
I'd listen to the Lee tech.
Hawg Haggen is online now  
Old May 26, 2011, 11:33 AM   #3
hornady
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 6, 2009
Location: SWPA
Posts: 428
Personally I would call Lee again, I am not an electrician and do not pretend to be.
I think the information you got from GE was to hook the pot up 110. Are you sure this is a 220 pot. The reason I ask. For 220 you should have 4 wires two hot, a ground and a neutral.
Three wires would indicate 110 a hot, ground and a neutral
hornady is offline  
Old May 26, 2011, 11:37 AM   #4
south.texas.dead.I
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 5, 2011
Posts: 262
Ya I'm sure this is a 220 it says so on the model


iPhone using Tapatalk
south.texas.dead.I is offline  
Old May 26, 2011, 12:05 PM   #5
IllinoisCoyoteHunter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 23, 2008
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 1,497
I also would call Lee...or go start a good hot fire and place a cast iron pot over it with your ingots in it. You will be castin' in no time!

I know you are very frustrated...I would be too. Lee tech should help ya get things straightened out. Good luck and let us know how it turns out!
__________________
~~IllinoisCoyoteHunter~~

~NRA LIFE MEMBER~
~NRA CERTIFIED INSTRUCTOR~
IllinoisCoyoteHunter is offline  
Old May 26, 2011, 12:33 PM   #6
hornady
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 6, 2009
Location: SWPA
Posts: 428
This may help you I did a search and came up with this.


http://garagegunsmithing.com/forum/v...php?f=37&t=878
hornady is offline  
Old May 26, 2011, 01:01 PM   #7
zxcvbob
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 20, 2007
Location: S.E. Minnesota
Posts: 4,021
Quote:
Three wires would indicate 110 a hot, ground and a neutral
No it doesn't.

Did the pot come with a plug? I think you screwed up getting a 220V, but it can be made to work. If you plug a 220V pot into a 110V outlet, it should warm up but at one fourth its rated output (which would really suck, but not as bad as burning it up)

What does the plug look like, and what does your outlet look like? You want a NEMA 6-15 outlet unless the pot has a NEMA 6-20 plug for some reason. NEMA 6-15 (15A 220V) has two horizontal blades with a round ground pin underneath.
__________________
"The only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is with a good guy with a gun"
zxcvbob is offline  
Old May 26, 2011, 01:08 PM   #8
zxcvbob
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 20, 2007
Location: S.E. Minnesota
Posts: 4,021
Quote:
I'm having some trouble wiring this, I got a 250v extension cord with 4 lead ins they are red back white and green. The pot has 3 which are brown blue and green. Tge green to green for grounding. Now the lee tech said that the white from the extension is supposed to be ignored and red was hot black is cold and greens are ground. The guy from home depot and lady from general electric said that black and Rex are tied in togethor as hot, white is cold which ties into the blue and green to green are grounding. Can someone who got this pot help me out.


Tape up the white wire. You don't use it but it shouldn't just float around in there where it could short out. Connect black-to-blue, red-to-brown, and green-to-green. (or black-brown and red-blue, it doesn't make any difference)
__________________
"The only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is with a good guy with a gun"
zxcvbob is offline  
Old May 26, 2011, 01:54 PM   #9
hornetguy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 14, 2011
Location: on the north side of DFW
Posts: 776
yep... you just have an extra wire in there. Don't need to use it at all. There should be two "hot" wires that each will measure 115V to ground, or 230V between the two. Those, and one ground wire should be all you need.
The color wire that you use (other than the green) is strictly up to you, depending on the plug configuration, of course.
It sounds like you bought a cord designed for three-phase power. (4 conductor) Your pot should be single phase. (3 conductor)
hornetguy is offline  
Old May 26, 2011, 02:05 PM   #10
zxcvbob
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 20, 2007
Location: S.E. Minnesota
Posts: 4,021
The supply cord has 2 hot wires on opposite legs of the service (red and black), a neutral wire (white), and a ground (green or bare.) It's for a normal 220V 4-wire circuit, like for a modern electric stove or dryer. The white wire is for the timer, clock, motor, electronics, etc that runs on 110v
__________________
"The only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is with a good guy with a gun"
zxcvbob is offline  
Old May 27, 2011, 12:35 AM   #11
south.texas.dead.I
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 5, 2011
Posts: 262
Got it running and cast about 400 bullets so far thanks for yalls help


iPhone using Tapatalk
south.texas.dead.I is offline  
Old May 27, 2011, 03:09 PM   #12
hornetguy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 14, 2011
Location: on the north side of DFW
Posts: 776
Quote:
The supply cord has 2 hot wires on opposite legs of the service (red and black), a neutral wire (white), and a ground (green or bare.) It's for a normal 220V 4-wire circuit, like for a modern electric stove or dryer. The white wire is for the timer, clock, motor, electronics, etc that runs on 110v
Got it... the white is the neutral for a 120V circuit. I've dealt mostly with industrial electrical stuff.. wasn't aware of the 4 conductor for home use. Thanks for the info.
hornetguy is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2013 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08011 seconds with 7 queries