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Old May 22, 2011, 11:41 AM   #1
shafter
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Flintlock question

How do you guys keep the power in the pan from going into the touch hole when your toting a flintlock? I know there's supposed to be some powder in there of course, but last time I was out hunting with it I opened the pan and most of the powder was gone. Is this normal?
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Old May 22, 2011, 12:43 PM   #2
arcticap
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How do you know that the powder is going into the touch hole and not dribbling out of the seam that's under the cover?

If the powder were going into the touch hole then maybe a threaded vent should be installed to prevent that from happening.
However if it's leaking out of the seam, then beeswax can be used on the lip of the pan to create a seal.
Another option would be to determine which carry positions are best to hold the gun at in order to prevent the pan from emptying and to check it often.
For instance, if the gun is held with very little cant (side to side angle variation) so the powder in the pan remains fairly level, then the powder shouldn't be leaving the pan unless there's excessive leakage in or out from carrying the gun at a bad angle.
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Old May 22, 2011, 01:11 PM   #3
Rifleman1776
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articap answered the question.
I would bet the lock you are using does not have a good fit from the frizzen to the pan. That is not uncommon on cheap locks. Some work with files can correct the situation in some cases.
My locks are high quality. Powder would never spill out. But, when carrying in the woods other things can (and have) happen. e.g. catching on branches or clothing will open the frizzen.
I make it practice, habit really, to check my pan frequently.
What kind of flintlock gun/lock do you have?
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Old May 23, 2011, 09:28 AM   #4
shafter
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Thanks for the replies.

I have a Traditions flintlock. The frizzen seal isn't perfect and at first I thought that was my trouble. I removed the lock and placed a small piece of tape over the touch hole. After placing the lock back on the gun I filled the pan with powder and shook the gun around. Nothing leaked out which leads me to believe that its going into the hole.
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Old May 23, 2011, 09:37 AM   #5
Hawg Haggen
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You shouldn't lose that much powder into the touch hole. Remember you have powder packed against it on the other side.
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Old May 23, 2011, 10:27 AM   #6
shafter
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Perhaps I'm putting too little in the pan.
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Old May 23, 2011, 12:39 PM   #7
Hawg Haggen
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Fill it to just below the touch hole but don't cover it.
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Old May 25, 2011, 02:19 AM   #8
Bill Akins
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It sounds like you may not be using enough powder in the pan. If the powder in your pan is loose and not under compression by the pan cover on the frizzen, it can shake around in the pan and may be why it is leaking out the pan seam you said was not perfect on your rifle. Try this. Put enough 4F powder in the pan so that it is just a leeeetle tiny bit "mounded up" in the pan so that the pan cover definitely presses against the powder when you close the frizzen's pan cover. The thing here is to make sure the powder is not loose in the pan but is under compression from the spring on the frizzen pan cover. That should hold it in place.

If your frizzen spring is of the proper temper and strength, it should hold the pan cover tightly against the powder....which should cause the powder to press not only against the pan cover....but also press against itself into a slightly compressed cake under spring tension from the pan cover. Even if the powder around the very edges of the pan might escape and fall out of your imperfect seam,....the majority of the rest of the compressed powder in the pan should stay put.

Also by virtue of the powder being compressed down onto itself by the pan cover, that pressure should hold the powder against itself and not allow it to loosely fall into the touch hole or out the seam of the pan to pan cover.

I think the problem is you aren't using enough powder in the pan. Try what I said and let us know if that makes a difference.

If it doesn't, I would suspect your frizzen spring is weak and not holding tightly enough against the powder to keep it compressed enough against itself and that is causing powder to be loose and to dribble out.



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Last edited by Bill Akins; May 25, 2011 at 02:25 AM.
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Old May 25, 2011, 06:09 AM   #9
Hawg Haggen
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That is way too much powder in the pan. It will have to burn it's way down to the touch hole resulting in slow fires. Not to mention prolly showering your face with sparks.
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Old May 25, 2011, 06:15 AM   #10
Mike Irwin
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When I first started shooting a flintlock, I thought you were supposed to hold the gun and shake it a bit so that the priming powder would get into the touchhole.

I never had a problem with misfires.

When a coworker who did the flint thing regularly told me that I wasn't supposed to do that, I thought I noticed a little faster ignition...

But I also would have the occasional misfire...
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Old May 25, 2011, 07:21 AM   #11
kwhi43@kc.rr.com
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This is what is supposed to look like. I shoot Flint pistol in National
competition every year, and you need the most fastest possible ingitiion
you can get. This has proved by high speed cameras and sensors to be the
very best for speed.



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Old May 25, 2011, 07:23 AM   #12
junebug_01
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That's what I love about this forum, you get just as much bad info as good info. Askins=bad info;Haggen=good info.
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Old May 25, 2011, 07:34 AM   #13
freedom475
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If your gun has a Patent Breech. (yours most likely does) Your touch hole will swallow around 3 pans worth of 4ffff powder.

Best solution is to just use 3fff powder, as your primer, when you are hunting or trekking.... the 4ffff might be a little faster, but not if it is all gone and your pan is empty when you go to shoot Save it for the range or tree stand.

Look around this sight and watch the vids, You will see a LOT of the Myths and theories put to rest, as being "Just Not true".

http://www.blackpowdermag.com/featur...xperiments.php
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Last edited by freedom475; May 25, 2011 at 07:44 AM.
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Old May 25, 2011, 08:31 AM   #14
Rifleman1776
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Where do I start? After 40+ years of flintlock shooting, I am in disagreement with: Bill Adkins, khwi....., and freedom475. Especially BA.
For fast, reliable flint ignition only a small line of powder across the bottom of the pan is needed. If the powder has to burn up to the flash hole ignition is slowed. The hole should never be covered. Ignition works in a manner similar to a venturi. When a charged rifle is carried, the primer and it's position must be checked frequently. I hunted all those years with a flinter. Carrying carefully and checking frequently is both part of the cuss factor and charm of using a flintlock.
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Old May 25, 2011, 12:06 PM   #15
noelf2
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You know what? I just use a couple dabs of powder from my brass primer and forget about it. I know the powder gets jostled around in there a bit while I'm walking, but it seems to right itself when I level it and aim at something.
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Old May 25, 2011, 12:42 PM   #16
shafter
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Good or bad I appreciate the replies!
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