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Old June 6, 1999, 11:48 PM   #1
John Hunter
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Join Date: March 22, 1999
Location: Lake Station, IN USA
Posts: 107
Harley, DC suggested that I post this over here,

Hi guys, I need some help for a lady over on one of the collecting boards, she posted the following:

"My father brought home a handgun when he returned from overseas after WWII. The firing pin has been removed, the only way it could be transported back to the States. My mother says it is German, however I have showed it to a few gun dealers who cannot identify it. The barrel is 7 sided; on the right side of the barrel there appears to be an R with a crown over it. On the bottom of the barrel there are some numbers 9706.13. Just below the cylinder(where the bullets go) is what looks like two crossed flags or flowers. As I said it was my father's and I have no idea what it is. It has been in a leather holster with the letters US stamped on the side.
Thank you in advance for your help.
Annie"

Here are some photos:

<a href="http://millennium.fortunecity.com/rollingacres/664/handgun1.jpg">Please Click Here to see one side</a>

<a href="http://millennium.fortunecity.com/rollingacres/664/handgun3.jpg">Please Click Here to see the other side</a>

Any help for the lady would be greatly appreciated. Thanks,


------------------
John - NRA - Lifer




[This message has been edited by John Hunter (edited June 07, 1999).]
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Old June 7, 1999, 02:26 AM   #2
blades67
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Join Date: April 22, 1999
Location: Chandler, Arizona, USA
Posts: 6,014
John, it looks to me to be a British made weapon. I think it could be a Webley, possibly a .455. I'm not an expert, just happen to have fired a few Webley's.

~Blades~
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Old June 7, 1999, 07:00 AM   #3
Harley Nolden
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Join Date: January 8, 1999
Location: Brunswick,GA USA
Posts: 1,884
John Hunter:
My records indicate that this is a British Bulldog design, six shot. It was made for export to Austria Hungary, where revolvers with short barrels were prohibited. The long barrel complied with the law but the sight was placed back from the muzzle so that part of the barrel could be cut away once the gun had been delivered.

This model falls into a catagory identified as a Constabulary type revoler. The proof marking R over crown is British. It does have the appearance of a Webley, however, I cannot locate that specific model in my Webley information.

The British Bulldog Patterns became a major class of pocket personal defense revolver. Its proto-type is generally believed to have been the Webley. This pattern was introduced in 1878-79 and made until the beginning of WWI. Calibers included .320, .380, .442, and .455 and .450. The genesis of the gun may be seen in the Royal Irish Constabulary, (RIC) Webely of 1867, or possibly in the gargantuan. 577 of the same era.

HJN

[This message has been edited by Harley Nolden (edited June 07, 1999).]
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Old June 7, 1999, 03:10 PM   #4
John Hunter
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Join Date: March 22, 1999
Location: Lake Station, IN USA
Posts: 107
Harley & blades67,

Thank you very much! I have copied the information and passed it on to Annie. I know she will be thrilled since local gunshops could not help her. You guys are the greatest! Thanks again.



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John - NRA - Lifer


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