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Old September 26, 2000, 03:11 PM   #1
LASur5r
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Dragontooth 73,
You mentioned once in a thread a martial art concept that was the ultimate goal in Japanese martial arts?
You know, I was heavily into finding the "Ultimate" martial art in the old days, but I noticed this one punch -one kill;one strike-one kill concept in many arts, especially in karate, aikido, and iaido. I beleive Mas Oyama tried it in his fight with a bull?
It was stressed in Shotokan and Iaido (Live Blade) before the mid-60's, then they got into the tournament karate scene.
It was important for self-defense because it was truly a defensive, counter offensive technique...execute a good block and a reverse two knuckle punch in the right location. And if executed correctly, it was supposed to stop a fight with one move.
In iaido, it was even more noticeable because you waited for the real attack and you timed the cut and sidestep in one move. In the Kurosawa movie, "The Seven Samurai" you see this demonstrated when the two samurai had a duel, first with bamboo sticks, then with swords.
After some years of practice, you develop a calmness..sort of no fear and you're totally relaxed about it even though you are facing a life or death situation...a zen moment.

In gun self-defense, a martial artist should seek that same calmness. You develop an almost meditative state, you shut off the inner voice that is going a mile a minute, you shut off all the what-if's and you are ready.

After having been in real life battles, though, both in war and in the street, it is much harder to maintain the calmness as you are on the move and there are multiple attackers and the incoming stuff is sometimes from different angles, areas.
I have not yet entered gun classes or competitions, could some of you IDPA, IPSC folks, and others give us ideas as to how you practice and what type of mental state you feel you reach while you run and gun?
Also, can some of you post some of the feelings or comments about what I have written? It is what I have observed and what I have experienced...but I do not feel this is true for everyone.
Thanks in advance for your comments.
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Old September 26, 2000, 03:46 PM   #2
Skorzeny
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Some (unsolicited) comments:

In context of unarmed combat, "one punch, one kill" concept is ineffective. IMHO, it is an indication of an exaggerated sense of one's ability to inflict harm with "bare hands."

Look at boxing. It is perhaps the best of the (prgramatic) pugilist systems and it does not teach "one punch, one knock-out."

Also, I would urge you not to draw lessons from movies, such as "The Seven Samurai." As much as we were all affected by cinema in one way or another, it is NOT something you should base your "life and death" training on.

The Zen concept of "Mushin" (empty-mind) is something that ancients developed from trial and error. There is a scientific basis for it.

An agitated mind results in a tense body. A tense body (especially with adrenaline) increase oxygen consumption (which means energy consumption) and gives a temporary burst of strength. Unfortunately, this is short-lived. The downsides are rapid exhaustion, narrow vision (tunnel vision), increased heart rate and inability to perform fine motor activity, not to mention inability to think, plan or act clearly.

These are all "bad" things in a fight or combat. However, they are natural phenomena that were built into us from the "caveman" days. It is extremely difficult to try to suppress them as some of them are "involuntary" (like heart rate).

The only way to suppress them is proper breath control. Breathing is the only way you can control involuntary activities of your body.

Aikido actually is quite good for learning the proper breath control (esp. the Ki Society faction). Yoga is very good as well.

Skorzeny

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For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the supreme excellence. Sun Tzu
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Old September 26, 2000, 07:12 PM   #3
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Skorzeny...
Thanks for your response. I have been having trouble transistioning unarmed self-defense with armed self-defense. More specifically, I have been having trouble analyzing the commonality of the two. Gunfoo with Kungfu.
In armed self-defense you want distance because a) it's harder for the BG to grab your weapon and b) a trained shooter has the advantage in shooting from a distance.
In unarmed self-defense, generally you want to close in on your opponent, especially when they are armed so that you can try to disarm the BG so that you can bring your "weapons" to bear.

In armed self-defense, you need from time to time, to provide a stationary platform so that you can shoot from that position, especially when you have multiple targets.
In unarmed self-defense, you need to constantly move to present a smaller target and maneuver the BG's to get in each other's way,minimizing their efforts while maximizing yours.

In armed self-defense against armed BG's you should move from hard cover to another hard cover when opportunity permits to gain advantage over your opponent(s).
In unarmed self-defense, you want to disarm your opponent ASAP so that you can get tactical advantage over the other BG's.

In either case, when it looks like the S**t is about to hit the meatgrinder, you better have a hole card to get out!
In shooting, I hold my breath and let it out slow to calm myself down, in unarmed striking...sometimes kiiyai(shout), othertimes, short soft exhales.

In the military, in combat, I learned stationary and static ambushes...because of our small unit strength, we constantly hit and run, trying to draw the enemy into an ambush where you can use fire support to bring all weapons to bear or we used misdirection so that we can E & E.

In civilian self-defense where you must use a firearm to defend your life or someone else's, you find that you can only depend on your own skills...the cavalry takes too long to arrive (Not their fault...too much area, too many BG's, and TSHTF too fast.)
Anyway, for what it's worth, I'm still trying to learn...I've come a little way from checking out my house without my sidearm to having a sidearm holstered, to having it cocked and locked and ready to rock and roll.

That's why I joined this Website, to learn from those who have been there and have experiences that I can learn from.
Thanks for the help, Skorzeny.

Keep your powder dry and shoot straight.

Any other differences/similarities?
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Old September 26, 2000, 10:09 PM   #4
Skorzeny
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LASur5r:

Yes, in your case, there seems to be a divergence between "armed" and "unarmed."

I would submit to you that it is because you conceptualize them differently.

You correctly assume that, in a gunfight, your primary goal is survival, which often necessitates escape. This, in turn, necessitates that you move from cover to cover and farther and farther in distance (from the hostile party).

However, in the "unarmed" situation, you seem to think of "defeating the enemy" as the primary goal. This, in my view, is incorrect. Whether or not you are armed, your goal should always be survival. This means E-S-C-A-P-E!

Your weapons and unarmed fighting training are tools to enable you to escape with as little harm as possible. In that light, in "unarmed" combat, you should try to create as much distance as possible just as you would in "armed" combat. Where there is an assymetry in force (say the attacker is armed and you are not), it is even more imperative that you get the heck out of there, double-time!

When we think of "martial arts" as tools for self-defense (more like self-preservation), we have to stop thinking in terms of "kicking ass" and "laying down the law" and more about escaping and surviving with little harm, just as we do in gunfights.

I think that Mark Tripp (on the Judo forum of the Mixedmartialarts.com) summarized it succintly and nicely and said something to the effect that:

"If you try to strike me, I'll run away. If you continue to try to engage me, you have to grab me from running away again. If you grab me, you are playing my game (Judo/grappling)."

Of course, the better outcome is if the attacker does not chase you when you run away. Problem solved. You live on...

Skorzeny

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For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the supreme excellence. Sun Tzu
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Old September 26, 2000, 10:36 PM   #5
dragontooth73
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more unsolicited comments:

ichigeki hissatsu (one strike, one kill) whether it is realistic in the context of unarmed combat, is an ideal that synchronizes perfectly with the ideals of warfare put down in asia. namely, the use of minimal force to achieve maximum effect. i submit to you examples such as pearl harbor and inchon, where well-placed strikes achieved effects far beyond the investment made into them.

in the context of unarmed combat, i believe that it takes years and years of the "proper" groundwork to achieve the physical potential necessary for a "ichigeki hissatsu" strike. we're talking about qigong exercises, and other yoga/gungfu infulenced breathing regimens which strengthen the natural power of the body. granted, that is something that can be quantified by scientific means.

western boxing takes a completely different tack: it emphasizes the ability to receive punishment in order to place oneself in a battle of attrition. to be considered one's physical peak in late teens and early 20s is rather peculiar for something that should be a combination of experience and physical conditioning. and if one strike one kill wasn't a possibility at all, there wouldn't be any knockouts and "go for the chin, rocky!" calls, would there?

and speaking of pankration and boxing:

(excuse me as i enter a flame-retardant bunker)

the reason why the fighting systems of the ancient western world such as pankration fell apart, was twofold:

(1) under the roman empire, they consolidated in the school of gladiatores - which specialized in various styles of armed and unarmed combat. just as these systems were reaching their peak, word reached china through arab traders of the gladiatorial contests. many gungfu masters took the call as a personal challenge, and walked west to rome. they called it the "dragon road", and those few who survived the torturous nine-month journey fought in the arenas and drove western unarmed combat into the ground. a little known bit of history.

(2) those systems of unarmed fighting as existed amongst the slavs and tribes of eastern europe took a beating under the mongol invasions of the 12th century. the mongols were the progenitors of what eventually evolved into sumo in its purest form, which moved into jujutsu and karate (it is no coincidence that sumo is the only martial art sanctioned by the imperial family) ... their primary focus was also in one strike one kill (silencing sentries, for example ... the mongols who fought in the soviet army during ww2 were well known for doing this with a quick kick to the nuts: a proven centuries-old method) out of necessity ... which is how they managed to minimize casualties, maximize their power projection and not only conquer, but maintain such a vast empire.

wow this went off in a tangent again

(flame-retardant bunker starts to melt)

Skorzeny, you're right about not using movies as the foundations for one's tactical mindset. however i have this book in japanese called "100 greatest sword duels of all time" (samurai duels, of course) and quite a number of them are based on the same lines. assuming there is a fair amount of ritual and hyperbole involved in the accounts, surely they can't ALL be biased to the point of being useless?

oh and i completely agree about the breathing bit. it is physiologically impossible to panic if one's breathing is under control ... nice to know something works good for a change

[This message has been edited by dragontooth73 (edited September 26, 2000).]
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Old September 27, 2000, 07:29 AM   #6
Danger Dave
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I think the one punch, one kill bit is an ideal to strive for, not an actual combat philosophy. Sort of a training philosophy, designed to improve focus and concentration on technique. It would be great to only have to strike once, but I don't know of any teacher that says you should count on somebody ever going down with one shot. What I've always been told is you do whatever it takes, however long it takes, to eliminate the threat. If it's possible to end the threat quickly, great, but be prepared to go the extra mile.

As to what Skorzeny about tension vs. breathing - I totally agree. Your level of muscle & mental tension is seriously linked to your breathing. The old masters who actually fought with their lives on the line understood this, but I think it's been largely forgotten in the last 50 years. Most of what is taught today is taught out of tradition, without an understanding of what they are doing or why. For example, breathing out, or even kiaing when striking - by expelling air and tensing the stomach & diaphragm, you magnify the power of the strike, you empty your lungs which makes it harder for your opponent to knock the breath out of you, and lastly, you clear the old air out of your lungs, forcing you to inhale deeply. One of the physical effects of panic is that you tend to hold your breath or breathe very shallow - a bad idea in a fight (try holding your breath and running windsprints). If if you expel all the air in your lungs, you will breathe in.

Which, in a roundabout sort of way, brings us back to the topic - if the one punch, one kill were more than an ideal, they wouldn't need techniques to improve/enhance endurance - it just wouldn't be a factor.

And if I hear one more "heeeyah!" masquerading as a kiai, I think I'm gonna lose my lunch.
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Old September 27, 2000, 08:51 AM   #7
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the point i probably flubbed is that ichigeki hissatsu is not an EASILY accesible ideal, but the cumulative effort of years, perhaps decades of the right training. if you want to churn out brawlers, then a system that builds on the body's ability to receive punishment and the reflexes to minimize it of course would be the way to go.

bull-stoppers like mas oyama aside, ichigeki hissatsu doesn't have to be a physical strike. you can take kano jigoro's legendary "yamaarashi" judo throw (by repute one which cannot be countered - there are texts for this but no one since kano has been able to replicate it correctly) and that would be the same thing.

translated loosely, the concept of ichigeki hissatsu doesn't have to be the karate seiken (lit. "standard fist") punch ... it can be any move that can end a confrontation immediately. i don't think there's an inherent emphasis on butt-kicking in it; but the ideal serves to pinpoint that if forced to engage, then the quickest end possible is the optimum solution.

(*peers out of hole*) am i still alive?

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Old September 27, 2000, 11:17 AM   #8
LASur5r
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Okay guys,
What do you guys think of this situation?

I had just totalled out my car the day before so I did not transfer my equipment to my other car.
Both my wife and I were hurting but she wanted to take her mom out for her birthday so my mother in law wanted to go to a restaurant...I was getting bad vibes and I tried to get her to go elsewhere. No go.
I park the car in the county open air parking lot (well lit) and lots of cars.
After dinner, I get my mother in law and wife in the car and my mother in law insisted that I put the doggie bags in the trunk. As I open the car trunk the light opens and I look towards the driveway...three guys in rain coats are walking towards a guy coming out of his car.
BG alert! BG alert!
Time to leave! I'm heading towards the driver's door and the three guys swerve towards me. At thirty feet and closing, the guy in the middle puts his hand in his pocket.
Immediate danger, Will Robinson.
I figure, they haven't made bullet proof glass for my car yet, I alert my wife to lock all doors and I toss here the keys and shut the door.
Making like I forgot something, I move towards the three BG's. I start out slow and gauging distance and timing I speed up to the middle BG with the hand in the pocket to throw their timing off...he pulls a .38 snubbie out of his pocket and cocks it bringing his hand up in an arch to point at me.
He says, "This is a stick up."
Too late bad boy, i think, I cross step in right foot in lead cutting to my left, right hand moving in a straight line perpendicular to his rising right arm with the gun. My body is already out of line with his gun hand.
using chi'sao, "sticky hands", my arm soft checks and traps his gun hand moving it towards his body. Because it is a "soft" block, he doesn't resist. Right hand goes to eye jab. Left hand trap check his right elbow turning him.
I've already stepped in between BG# 1 at my 12, BG #2 is at my 9 now, BG #3 is at my 1 and trying to move to my 5 o'clock because I am moving to the right flank of BG #1 using him as a physical block.
Mr. Murphy now steps in, as I go for the disarm, I miss the grab on the snubbie and it hits the deck and bounces onto the pavement. BG#2 is now behind me with both his hands in his pocket and I'm already behind BG #1 to meet his turning away from me, I knee him in the face, but hold him up to use as a shield against BG #2.
Instead of coming at me as I expected BG #2 runs to the rear door of the driver's side and pounds the window and yells at me that he will shoot my mother in law who is sitting in the rear seat. BG#3 is in a flanking position behind a parked car about 30 feet away and he has a gun in his hand pointed in my direction.
I let BG #1 go, kicked the snubbie under the car as I walked with my hands up towards BG #2. I started to think about him shooting mother in law, but she and I get along ok....so....Also I could have bugged out, but i would have left the one i cared for in the hands of the BG's...no can do.
End result? I was a punching and kicking bag for a little while and I gave them $20...I keep my bankroll in another pocket.
No big deal on the punching bag...I just zoned out...zen moment. It only got rough when they hit spots that really hurt from the car accident. I did do correct breathing at that time, though.
Couldn't put wife and mother in law in greater risk.
The real kicker?
They stayed in the parking lot (big lot) so I couldn't go for the pay phone (no cell phones then), so I got in the car as soon as they pulled away and got us out of there, when I got to a pay phone out of the area to call the police...the officer asked me why did I leave the scene? He threatened to arrest me for leaving the scene of the crime.
I told him that if they didn't want to catch the BG's after I gave him their descriptions, then I am again just a statistic. I hung up.
Thank god even with the mistakes made and given the situation, nobody really got hurt. I figure I was a gone goose, a dead duck...insert whatever saying that fits.
just happy to be here.
Comments? criticisms?Any suggestions?
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Old September 27, 2000, 11:45 AM   #9
Danger Dave
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I'm not saying it's impossible to end a confrontation with one well-executed technique (that it is possible has been proven time and time again), I'm just saying that it's not a fighter's philosophy. I've dropped people (and been dropped) with a single shot, but normally it takes an accumulation of effective techniques to wear your opponent down. If you practice every technique like it's a potentially fight ending blow, when you have to "go", you will use hard, fast techniques. If you practice like "this won't take him out, but I'll do it half-heartedly anyway", your technique won't do anything but open you up for a counterattack. You have to strike with "bad intentions".

Wearing padded gloves, as in boxing, changes a lot. If boxing were bare-knuckle, they would probably put more emphasis on defense and less on winning through attrition. Even with the gloves, they don't teach weak punches, although a distinction is made between jabs and "power" punches (a good, solid jab can be quite effective in it's own right).

It doesn't matter if it takes one, or one hundred techniques to eliminate a threat, you'd better be prepared to go the distance.
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Old September 27, 2000, 04:02 PM   #10
LASur5r
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Danger Dave,
I just want to make sure...point of clarification?
You mean dropped as in being hit by a punch or kick, right?Because you wrote," I've dropped people (and been dropped) with just one shot."
Not as in bullet shot, right?
If it is the latter, I'd really like to hear those stories.
I'd still like to hear about those times that you dropped a person with one shot, though.
Thanks in advance. : :
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Old September 27, 2000, 04:33 PM   #11
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LAsur5r,

Wow. Bottom line first. Every one went home in one piece and it only cost you $20. That's a win. I'm glad there was no more to physically carry hom than some bruises.

I've been in a parking lot, or two, and have found myself mulling over the sit for years afterward wondering what I could/would/should have done differently. Those personal debriefs have an awful high value, even considering the price/risk paid to get to them. What lessons did you learn?


Rick
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Old September 27, 2000, 08:06 PM   #12
LASur5r
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Danger Dave,
I agree in a lot of what you say, that's why I carry ten rounds in my magazine, not one.
Also I learned to "break" an opponent down with multiple strikes in different areas to bring the opponent down.

Rebel,
I learned first, listen to my instincts, not mother in law's but I might have taken more lumps if I hadn't taken her to her favorite restaurant.
Second, Pack at all times. Be prepared.
Third, most important thing is get the good guys out alive and hopefully unhurt even though you might have to surrender? to gain the upper hand at the right moment. (Just thought of something...hold that thought)
Fourth, make sure you have back up when possible. Wife is now packing because of another incident which I already posted. Two reasons...watch your six and so that she could fend off all boarders if I go down.
Fifth, learn from other people's mistakes preferable to learning from your own errors...less painful that way...Nah, actually all my life, I have been learning the hard way...graduate of school of hardknocks.
Sixth, some being more powerful than I is watching over me. I have been lucky more times than a body should. Not knocking it, just appreciate it.
I'm sure there is more I learned, but I wanted to touch on something that hit me earlier...'xcuse me for a minute, Reb.

Skorzeny,
I'd like your input... if I had been packing already do you think it would have been better if I had gone to the fast draw to target the first immediate threat of BG #1 drawing his weapon?
Then turn to BG #2, a few feet from BG #1, and counter his attack with both his hands hidden in his jacket? Take a chance that he is packing inside the jacket pockets?
Remember now, that BG #3 is now at my 5 o'clock , draped over the hood of a parked car, pointing a handgun in my direction?

Just a though while I was thinking about it. I believe, I would have to have responded aggressively in this case due to the fact that there are multiple armed BG's and my wife and mother in law are in the car, defenseless.
I went over this experience with my wife the other day because I posted this story and she feels that she would have engaged BG #3 as she had the engine and car as hard cover.
I explained that her weak point would be her 4 o'clock (rear of car), in case BG #2 had run away from me then he would be at her blind side and if she didn't drop BG #3 quickly she would have no where to go.

Complicated, isn't it?.

Dragontooth73,
Thanks, bruddah, for the back up and the info. Mahalo.
In unaarmed self-defense I think I have to compromise between the one strike concept to leading and controlling the opponent until I can either lead him into a strong counterattack where I can drop the opponent on the deck to hit the floor or wall hard so that he is hurt by the strike, then the impact of the floor and or wall or both. Achieved a bunch of knockouts with the set up. Easy to learn too.
I've been playing with this unarmed method for years. Have taught it to many folks and used it in more street fights. Had some of my friends use it in street situations. Before my daughter? youngest person to use these techniques was 42 years old. after 4 to 9 months training. Not a miracle style, just been searching for years to find a better way for me to survive.
My last street fight? 6 months ago. Guy tried to stab me with a steak knife in the street..he mumbled something, pulled the knife and lunged.
When I counter moved after the parry, he hit the wall with the back of his head, then when he bounced forward, his face hit the deck. Ouch, those hard surfaces sure can hit hard.
Meanwhile, I keep the search for simpler and better stuff to use to survive.

Thanks again, folks. Keep those ideas flowing, we all learn something by participating,some by reading, but we learn and progress.
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Old September 28, 2000, 08:28 AM   #13
Danger Dave
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No, I've never shot anyone - by "shot" I was referring to a punch or kick.

As far as times I've dropped someone with a single clean shot, well, it was usually just a simple clean shot to either the chin or solar plexus. To the chin, usually a roundhouse or a ridgehand or punch. To the solar plexus, either a punch or a front kick. Oh yeah - and I dropped one of our black belts when I was about 15 by an accidental groin stomp - he was trying to sweep my foot out from under me, I pulled my kicking foot straight down, only to feel it hit something squishy. I looked down, I see his eyes as big as saucers, and my foot planted square on his groin. First thought through my head - "Uh oh - I'm dead". Similar stories for the times I've been dropped - a bareknuckle punch or front-round kick to the solar plexus (happened fighting 2-on-1 on my BB test), a punch or roundhouse to the chin, spinning hook kick to the back of the head, etc.

Now that I think about it, most (I'd say 80-90%) of the clean knockdowns I've seen were caused by one of two things - surprise/lack of warm-up (it seems to take time to get up to full speed - catching someone in the first 1-2 seconds before they adjust to the speed of their opponent seems to happen fairly often) or fatigue. Mostly fatigue. Being tired takes the focus out of technique, slows your defense & offense down, makes your breathing outta whack, etc. Whoever wears down first usually loses, all other things being relatively equal.

Weirdest nearly disabling blow I've been hit with was a straight-up (as in vertical - this guy was real flexible and short) side kick to the armpit. It surprised me when my arm went numb, but it's just plain weird being kicked straight up like that - all the weight just comes off your feet - weird. His reaction was funny - "eeeewwwww!" while wiping my armpit sweat off his foot...

LASur5r, I don't know what to say about your story except wow! Did you get off easy! Nowadays, they probably would have shot you & the witnesses just for kicks. Your experience is a good example of how things go when reality rears it's ugly head. You just don't ever know what's next....

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Old September 28, 2000, 09:32 AM   #14
LASur5r
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Danger Dave,
You have been doing some heavy duty sparring...good on you.
You've reminded of some other times...a long time ago.

They say that the third thing to go when you get older is your memory...I forget what the other two things were.

One of the funniest (not at the time) one stop kicks was when our dojo was doing a karate demonstration for a Kiwani's club. In the school was a really attractive husband and wife team that appealed to all the audiences. The wife was real petite and the husband was a good sized guy...he dwarfed her when he stood next to her.
Anyway, it was supposed to have been a forward two hand choke attack and she was supposed to block the hands and front snap kick to the groin. (Pulling the kick of course.)
As things usually go, Mr. Murphy showed up and the attacker moved in too close and she snap kicked.
I was standing where I could see their faces...his eyes bulged out, he grabbed his private area and her face turned red and she put her hand over her mouth.
When we finally got him to uncurl a little and let go of his death grip, we found that she had split his "aluminum" groin protector in half. Yow!

A friend of mine that works in a gun shop told me that he was turned down once more on a CCW, even though his ex-wife made two attempts on his life.
The first time, he claims, that a car pulled up at the end of his driveway...driver's side window facing him. He was washing his car and just moved to around the front of his car when three shots rang out. The car then sped off.
Then again, the next time, he had just received the divorce decree when ex-wife shows up outside his garage and when he comes out, she whips out a .45 and fires at him. He kept running around the car as she chased him firing the .45. Lucky, it only had a 7 round magazine.
As she reloaded, he ran into the house and locked the door to call "911". She ran away.
I verified the story by checking the police report through the commander.
I guess the local chief is waiting for the ex-wife to get it right before he might issue the CCW. (Not good enough reason?)
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Old September 28, 2000, 10:04 AM   #15
LASur5r
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Danger Dave,
Just a note?
Try going to finishing technique after your opponent is down in sparring. Find someone who is willing to do that with you and you might discover even though you take a really hard hurting hit and you go down? If you know that he is coming after you to finish you off, you will find the strength to get to your feet quickly or at least to your knees to try to defend yourself. (Good for real street self-defense)

When I first started karate, I found I was really good at aerial attacks...flying kicks.
Skorzeny, you'll like this.
One day a visiting karateka came in during the day...he was rough and rude and several of our ranking guys challenged him to spar...he easily defeated them. I was responsible for opening and cleaning the dojo so after he defeated the challengers he threatened to spread the word about the school having a bunch of worthless karateka.
I decided that I better defend the school's reputation or at least try.
When we squared off, I went immediately into a flying side kick. He went to rising upper block under my foot and I fell on my shoulders and head hitting the hard vinyl floor. That took the wind out of me. He bent down and two knuckle punched me in the temple.
He turned to walk away in contempt.
I dizzily got up and yelled at him to stop. We squared off again and I threw a hard lead hand back knuckle, followed with a flying roundhouse. This time I misjudged and my foot went behind his head, missing the kick, but he rgrabbed my leg and down I went again...this time it was a clean drop. My head hit the floor without my shoulders to take some of the impact. He came in again to deliver the finishing blow.
I was out of the fight, but I found a burst of energy to come to a sitting position and missed the block...he hit me square between the eyes.
Man, did my body hurt.

He strutted out of the dojo in his gi.

He dropped by a year later to challenge the dojo...this time I had begun taking kung-fu classes...outcome was way different.
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Old September 28, 2000, 07:32 PM   #16
Gunslinger
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Join Date: January 5, 1999
Location: Springfield, Missouri
Posts: 2,105
In gun self-defense, a martial artist should seek that same calmness.

Without commenting on the unarmed self defense aspect of the discussion I will say I have been involved in a few armed confrontations. Two resulted in shots being exchanged by both sides. I can say that, for me at least, everything around me ceased to exist for that brief moment that seemed to be moving in slow motion. My focus was directed solely at the immediate threat. So much so in fact that had there been another, second or third, threat I may have well missed it until too late. The mental reaction was not a matter of training or a conditioned response but rather a matter of an unconsious survival response to the imminent threat.

------------------
Gunslinger

I was promised a Shortycicle and I want a Shortycicle!
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