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Old April 15, 2000, 02:52 PM   #1
Mark Freburg
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Removed due to lack of interest...

[This message has been edited by Mark Freburg (edited April 16, 2000).]
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Old April 16, 2000, 10:34 PM   #2
Jeff Thomas
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Mark, if I read these dates right, next time try to give it more than just a day. Sometimes it takes awhile for folks ...

Regards from AZ
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Old April 17, 2000, 10:02 AM   #3
WETSU
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I'll answer your question. I do train, but you know, some days I don't expend any ammo. Shooting is only part of what I do. This past weekend I spent with some team members on patrolling, site selection and set up, and some tracking/counter tracking. No shooting. When we do shoot it's structured, and planned out in a progressive manner starting with safety briefing, etc movinig to .22 pistol and rifle markmanship, then primary rifle and sidearm, them multiple targets, reload drills, man down, cover and concealment,shoot-no shoot targets, and lastly finish up with specfic weapons such as shotgun. Other times we do the whole live fire, team effort, many targets,weapons transition, man down, break contact etc-spread out over a Jungle land type set up. Not a whole lot of blazing going on. You don't learn dick from blazing and neither do your teammembers watching you. Just my $.02.
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Old April 17, 2000, 05:28 PM   #4
bullseyekp
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I am not a LEO but I would guess "training" would apply to anyone who practices defensive tactics and principles. I shoot twice a week if possible. One day I practice marksmanship and the other day I practice skills and tactics that are useful for carry and home defense. Every once in a while I do just go throw lead downrange, but that is usually plinking and having fun.

I have learned that to have the freedom to practice my "skills," I need to go to the range when no one else is there due to safety concerns. Some people tend to look at you funny when you start doing tac reloads and moving around, not to mention its not safe when others are closeby.
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Old April 18, 2000, 01:21 PM   #5
VictorLouis
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A little bit of both, really. This past weekend was a fun outing with another couple and us. But if it's just me, or with a friend, I try to do some "learning". Sometimes you do just have to cut loose!
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Old April 18, 2000, 08:04 PM   #6
ATM
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Not always, in fact I spend a lot more time doing dryfire practice then actual shooting. Especially since I took to learning my G29 recently. I find my scores and times go further in the right direction after much deliberate dryfire, then after lots of rounds downrange. When I do shoot, it is a set pattern, such as a qualification course, focus drills, speed from the holster, etc. I never cover more then one aspect in each session, which is usually less then half an hour.
My dryfire to shooting ratio is about 4 to 1, partly do to logistics such as ammo cost, and time to get to the range when it is open.

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Old April 18, 2000, 08:15 PM   #7
RHC
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Both. Sometimes it's fine just to blast a magazine or two off, you know?
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Old April 20, 2000, 06:40 PM   #8
johnwill
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Mark Freburg:
Removed due to lack of interest...
[/quote]

Jumped the gun a bit quick here Mark.


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Old April 21, 2000, 10:29 AM   #9
garys_2k
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When I get to the range I try to make every shot count toward skill building. Its hard to get out so its important that I maximize the results. I do dry fire at home and that helps a LOT toward technique, grip, unlearn flinching, etc.

That said, last time I was at the range the people in the lane next to me left their silhoutte target hanging at about eight yards out. I usually practice with home made targets (adapted from Joe Dioso) that I find effective and better than the standard bull. Seeing that silhouette was irresistable -- I jumped to that land and emptied a whole magazine into it. I guess the other practise is paying off because I got quite a number of nine and ten ring hits.
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Old April 24, 2000, 03:24 AM   #10
Hart Industries Defense
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Life is tough and some gotta go but...

I expend lots of ammo every chance I get.

Only training and more training is the only way to weed out your bad behaviours and find out what is good for you.

This is the same in any enterprise and not just shooting. Practice makes perfect.

Why do we train if we only expect a half life of 30 seconds of real life combat. That means that in two minutes only 6 percent is left alive - slightly more than the 5 percent error margin.

We train firing 10,000 rounds of ammo a day in an 8 hour shift so that the 30 second half life counts.

War is simple; and everyone is smart. It is the first one that makes a mistake that dies. There really is not that much to battle if you really think about it. No surprises. There really is only so much you can do. Many are better than you. Faster than you. More practiced than you. Keep practicing only because the next guy is practicing.

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Mark Freburg:
Removed due to lack of interest...

[This message has been edited by Mark Freburg (edited April 16, 2000).]
[/quote]



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Old April 24, 2000, 03:35 AM   #11
Hart Industries Defense
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Oh Also, you do not have to make every shot count; just keep firing. Practice makes perfect. Just the activity of shooting gets you better. Some people say good practice makes good and bad practice makes bad. I say it really does not matter. If you are not ready to die; you better find yourself a desk job and behave funny so you can get out of the military; you realize it is a volunteer force these days. I personally do not believe in killing animals with a gun; if you are going to kill an animal, I suggest you use your bare hands or at most a short knife equal in length to the animals longest teeth or horn or claw. For beasts of prey like lions, bears, or tigers (if they exist any more) I will allow a short sword no longer than 2 feet; but, never a lance or spear (this is unfair and unsportsmanlike. To people who shoot animals with a gun; I say try using your hand and knife, be fair to animals. Guns are for humans.

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Mark Freburg:
Removed due to lack of interest...

[This message has been edited by Mark Freburg (edited April 16, 2000).]
[/quote]

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Old April 24, 2000, 12:12 PM   #12
Zensho
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For my budget I try and practice with some intent when I go to the range. I dont have the money to spend on mindless blasting...and missing. On the other hand there are many people who own guns that attend the ranges, who will be genuinely taken aback if they see you clearing leather and double tapping with any intent. Yes, there are sheeple who own guns, many. So in the presence of these folks I pretend I'm a kinder gentler target shooter
On shooting animals: Fair? heh heh NOT. cheat and win.

[This message has been edited by Zensho (edited April 24, 2000).]
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Old April 24, 2000, 06:23 PM   #13
Glamdring
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I start up close for the first string. No warm up or anything--the way it will most likly happen in the real world. The only thing I do different than reality is that I put the ear muffs on first.
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Old April 25, 2000, 10:56 AM   #14
Spectre
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Hart Industries Defense:
Oh Also, you do not have to make every shot count; just keep firing... To people who shoot animals with a gun; I say try using your hand and knife, be fair to animals. Guns are for humans.
[/quote]

Righhhhhht. Just keep firing. Personally, I thought, if you shot it, you bought it. My bad.

Who's sportsmanlike? It is natural for predators to take every advantage they can. Since mankind has killed off most of the natural predators in North America of some of the larger game animals, it therefore must fall to humans to fill in the gap, for the health of the species. It's a moral obligation.
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Old April 25, 2000, 06:56 PM   #15
Blue Heeler
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Drill is important.Every week I drill the same thing--draw from concealment and fire.
Usually 25-50 rounds (S&W J Frame)
Anything else is covered by match shooting.
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Old April 27, 2000, 11:46 AM   #16
Watch-Six
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I don't do "mindless banging away". I use a rest to confirm sight adjustment and to test ammo for accuracy. Most practice is off hand, usually at metal plates. At indoor range practice drawing is considered poor form. Out in the boonies I draw and shoot. I think it is real training. So are local IDPA matches.

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Old May 1, 2000, 07:16 PM   #17
FPrice
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Mark Freburg:
Removed due to lack of interest...

[This message has been edited by Mark Freburg (edited April 16, 2000).]
[/quote]

Mark,

I've been meaning to reply to this for a while. Lately my "practise" has been more of the static target practise type, due mainly to time contraints and lack of an appropriate range. Looking for a way to remedy this I happened to find a roughly 50-round practice regimen suggested by Ken Hackathorn. It involves shooting at a single target, then multiple targets, shooting while moving, and at different ranges. All I have to do now is
get to my range at a time when no others are there so that I have the freedom to draw, move and shoot.

Frosty
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Old May 1, 2000, 08:03 PM   #18
Gopher .45
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Since I am not LEO and am not even in a high risk job, location, or often travel in those areas, training is on and off depending on time available and range rules. I shoot at least once a week. Sometimes it is simply bulls-eye and trigger control type practice and switching hands. If no one is on the range but me, then I set up several targets and do holster drills from a concealed and from an unconcealed holster. With the multiple targets, I practise shooting while moving laterally (lanes are open, not stalls). Once a month or so, I rent the tactical range and get to "play" in all of its forms from run & shoot, turn and shoot, multiple targets, from cover, tactical reloading, combat reloading, etc. I even load the magazines with the occasional snap-cap to work on jam/misfire drills while going through the scenarios.

I don't know that I would call all of this training per se. I have a very good time with all of it. Even a bad day shooting is still better than a good day of working. The only goal that I have is to be faster and more accurate than whatever a situation may call for (including just running away). I figure my bad days are the best guage of my abilities when I am at the tactical range because they will probably more closely approximate stress situations than my calm days which are usually higher scoring. Here lately, the bad days this year are starting to look like the good days I was having last year.

Now if I just had a partner and a timer, then life would be great...
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Old May 26, 2000, 08:45 PM   #19
PreserveFreedom
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I can be found almost every weekend popping off rounds in the Las Palomos hills. 22's are cheap and good to keep your skill, but I'll still splurge now and then and shoot the big toys, because if you aren't used to what you carry, you might as well not carry it. No matter how much you train (and training never hurt) I would say pop off as much ammo that you can afford without depleting your home stockpile.
 
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