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Old September 10, 2016, 10:18 PM   #1
Cossack
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Uberti and Pietta SAA copies: relative merits of each?

I'm looking into getting a Single Action Army type revolver and have little experience with the design. Because I want a traditional-function and style 7.5" .45 (and I'm not ready to pony up - pun intended - for a Colt or USFA until I get to know the type better) I'm mostly narrowed down to the Italian copies made by Pietta and Uberti. The Cimarron line seems attractive, and they carry both makes for about the same price:

Uberti:
https://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/...RD+45LC+7.5%22

Pietta:
https://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/...C+7.5in+6rd+Bl

What are the relative merits of each Spaghetti Colt? I've heard rumors to the effect of the steel being softer in the Pietta, but in other regards it may be superior.

Reliability? Durability? Function? Historic Authenticity? Etc...

Anything else I should be considering? Thanks!

Last edited by Cossack; September 11, 2016 at 12:38 AM.
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Old September 11, 2016, 03:00 AM   #2
Cousin Pat
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SSA

My luck has been with Uberti -- same "4 click" hammer as Colts and quality is good. Taylor's (below) has comprehensive listing -- you need to think about barrel lengths, calibers and short-stroke kits (if for cowboy-action competition). By way of contrast, a blued 7.5" 45LC config might be "traditional" while a stainless, 4.75", 38sp might be handy, low-maintenance and cheap to run -- maybe even add adjustable sights.

http://www.taylorsfirearms.com/hand-...er-series.html
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Old September 11, 2016, 12:23 PM   #3
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I was facing the same decision a year or so ago. On one of the forums, a guy that specializes in smithing single actions said that the current Pietta clones are better as they use a hardened steel bushing around the firing pin hole and are hardened in a couple other areas as well.

I ended up buying a Cimarron Pietta in .357 Magnum. The action is very smooth. Timing is perfect. Sights were dead on at 25 yards with 158 gr loads.

I've always been more of a Uberti guy, but my Pietta is top notch.
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Old September 11, 2016, 12:58 PM   #4
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I have always been a Uberti fan but I think the current run of Pietttas approach the quality of the Uberti and possibly exceed it. The color-case hardening finish on the Piettas looks better and more authentic to me that that on the currently-made Ubertis. And I certainly like the firing pin bushing on the Piettas for durability. I have read that the innards of the Piettas are a bit rougher than the Ubertis but have no experience with that. Deadwood Johnson would be the guy to ask about these guns. He knows as much about them as anyone.
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Old September 11, 2016, 03:28 PM   #5
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Pietta for open top Colt clones. Uberti for 1873 clones.

http://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...d.php?t=566489

YMMV
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Old September 12, 2016, 02:04 PM   #6
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Uberti used to have an advantage in quality but Pietta has really upped their game and is now easily their equal.
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Old September 12, 2016, 09:29 PM   #7
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I have 1 Uberti, 1 Cimarron and I just got a gun from Taylor's (short stroke Runnin' Iron). All are made by Uberti. All are similar and shoot good. My favorite would be the Cimarron, but have only shot about 2000 rounds though the Taylor's so still getting that one just the way I want it. (I file the front sights down to get them just right).
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Old September 15, 2016, 12:25 AM   #8
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Thanks for the helpful info all.Can anyone tell of the parts interchangeability (with Colt), such as internals and grips, and spare parts availability of each make (Uberti and Pietta)?
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Old September 15, 2016, 09:17 PM   #9
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I like the Ubertis. I have three different revolvers -a '51 Navy, a 357 Bisley and a 7 1/2" SAA like you are looking for. All are excellent quality and I've owned a lot of different brands over the years.

My Uberit 7 1/2" 45 Colt SAA gets a steady diet of lead cast and as I cast and reload, it's reasonable for me to shoot as much as I want to. I normally use either a 200 gr or 255 gr out of it. Chambers are not he generous side and it likes both .452 and .454 depending on which mold I'm using.

I can't really speak for the Pietta 45 Colts. I have a Pietta .36 Remington NMA "Navy" and it is an excellent quality pistol and shoots well.

However, I was at the LGS the other day and they had what was supposed to be a "Uberti" 45 Colt SAA with a 4 3/4" barrel. I"m looking for one so asked to take a look at it. It turned out to be "mis advertised" and instead was a Pietta. Someone had put faux stag grips on it which wouldn't be a deal buster for me but in handling it, it just didn't have the feel of my Ubertis - maybe it was just me though.

If you are going to order one - I found that the LGS that i ordered my Ubertis through gave me a much better price than the MSRP. If you have several LGS in your area, check and see what they will do on the price.

No, the Ubertis and Piettas aren't a "real Colt" - but in my mind, mine are just as good and the bullets and targets, cans, etc. can't tell the difference. I like mine enough that, like I said, I'm now looking for a 4 3/4" for easier carry on the farm than the 7 1/2" barrel.
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Old September 20, 2016, 05:00 AM   #10
Kilibreaux
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Uberti you won't be able to tell from COLT aside from markings.

Pietta you WILL be able to tell from COLT due to slight dimensional variations.
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Old September 20, 2016, 07:28 AM   #11
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I think all the Piettas have the transfer bar system. I know mine does. And while I love that revolver and carrying it around with all 6 safely is great. I'm still going to get a Uberti for the more authentic firing system. The Pietta is beautiful though, fit and finish is great, and she shoots where ya point it. Here is a pic.

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Old September 20, 2016, 06:11 PM   #12
Cossack
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Gorgeous revolver, deerslayer.

Thanks for all of the replies. I had my FFL order me in a Cimarron Uberti, which should be here any day now.

On the transfer bar, It was my impression that at least the Cimarron Piettas did not have one.

I'm not totally opposed to the idea of the transfer bar. While I'm big on historical authenticity, I like the idea of carrying six shots safely. However, I've heard that some of the transfer-bar sixguns out there had reliability/durability issues (not Ruger, of course, but I see Ruger as a slightly different animal). If there's one with a solid reputation, I'd love to hear about it.
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Old September 20, 2016, 08:14 PM   #13
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Quote:
On the transfer bar, It was my impression that at least the Cimarron Piettas did not have one
That's interesting and good to know, thank you!

Quote:
I've heard that some of the transfer-bar sixguns out there had reliability/durability issues (not Ruger, of course, but I see Ruger as a slightly different animal). If there's one with a solid reputation, I'd love to hear about it.
I can't help with that. I have not heard of any reliability issue's. I don't have a ton of rounds through mine (150) but so far so good. Post up some pics of your new Hog leg when ya get it.
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Old September 24, 2016, 09:11 PM   #14
Cossack
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It's fun!

I'm not used to shooting SA revolvers and I find I'm not shooting well with it yet, but while resting all shots touch at 10yds, so it's me, not the gun. The feel is great. Hammer is not too heavy, and the trigger is light and crisp.

Magtech Cowboy 250gr loads shoot about 1" high and left at 10yds. CCI Blazer 200gr Gaping Maw of Death loads seem to be about on for elevation, but also shoot left for windage. While I'll check into more loads before I start messing with it, how does one get the windage adjusted? Is that purely a gunsmith job?

Thanks!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Uberti.jpg (166.4 KB, 123 views)
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Old September 24, 2016, 09:27 PM   #15
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Very nice!! Congrats!! As far as windage alot of guys just compensate. I have heard you can bend the front sight blade too. But more knowledgeable single action guys will chime in.

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Old September 25, 2016, 02:43 PM   #16
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Some but not all of the Piettas have the transfer bar ignition. Uberti makes an 1873 revolver called the "Horseman" that has a transfer bar but I've never seen one. More recently they developed a Cattleman II that has an internal passive safety that causes the hammer mounted firing pin to retract into the hammer if the trigger is not held back.

I see a fair amount of Uberti revolvers being used in cowboy action shooting; fewer Piettas but they are out there. If I wanted a traditional style single action I think I'd probably go with the Pietta; personal preference.
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Old September 26, 2016, 12:05 AM   #17
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Quote:
Thanks for the helpful info all.Can anyone tell of the parts interchangeability (with Colt), such as internals and grips, and spare parts availability of each make (Uberti and Pietta)?
Howdy

Parts are not interchangeable with a Colt.


Quote:
Uberti you won't be able to tell from COLT aside from markings.
Ummmmm excuse me, but I have Colts, and I sure as hell can tell them from an Uberti.


Quote:
Very nice!! Congrats!! As far as windage alot of guys just compensate. I have heard you can bend the front sight blade too. But more knowledgeable single action guys will chime in.

Trying to bend the front sight is an excellent way to snap it off. The proper way to adjust windage on a single action revolver is to turn the barrel. But don't try it yourself, you are liable to spring the frame. Let a gunsmith who has the proper clamp do it.

But first, find out if it is you and not the gun. A lot of guys who are used to adjustable rear sights find that they shoot to one side with fixed sights. They don't realize they have been compensating for poor trigger technique by adjusting the rear sight. Make sure you are pulling the trigger with the pad of the finger, don't put the trigger in the crease under the joint. That will result in too much finger on the trigger and a right handed shooter will tend to push his shots to the left. Pulling the trigger with the pad of the finger allows the trigger pull to be more straight back, lessening the tendency to push the shots to the side.
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Old September 26, 2016, 12:12 AM   #18
Cossack
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Thanks for the advice. I'll pay close attention to my technique. I'll certainly be doing a lot of shooting and tinkering with different loads before I mess with the sights at all. If it becomes necessary I'll take it to the smith.
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Old September 26, 2016, 12:21 AM   #19
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I have not had the Pietta...but the Uberti and Cimarron are good to go...LOVE mine.
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Old September 26, 2016, 07:11 AM   #20
deerslayer303
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don't put the trigger in the crease under the joint
Hmm, thats exactly where I put the trigger I pull the trigger with the crease even with long guns too. This is great advice Driftwood! I will try out the pad of my finger next time out to the range.
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Old September 26, 2016, 07:54 AM   #21
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I have two Cimarron/Uberti SA revolvers this Bisley model with custom Stag grips is my favorite of the two, but I love both of them.

As much as I hate to I'll be parting with this sweet revolver along with most of my gun collection and other things.

Also have a unfired Colt SA revolver, that will be sold right along with the rest.

Cossack, before you go to bending sights or turning barrels if you can handload for that revolver.

Best Regards
Bob Hunter
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Old September 26, 2016, 08:13 AM   #22
Cossack
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Lovely gun, Bob. Sorry you have to part ways with it. Good advice, and as I mentioned, I won't go messing with the sights or barrel until I try more loads and a range of adjustments to the nut behind the trigger.
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Old September 26, 2016, 11:46 AM   #23
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Quote:
Hmm, thats exactly where I put the trigger I pull the trigger with the crease even with long guns too. This is great advice Driftwood! I will try out the pad of my finger next time out to the range.
Yup, it feels more natural to put the trigger in the crease, but pulling the trigger with the pad of the finger allows the trigger to be pulled back slightly straighter. The truth is, all we can do with our fingers is to curl them or straighten them. I can see everybody trying this right now. You can't really pull a trigger straight back, all you can do is eliminate as much of the curl as possible, by pulling the trigger with the pad of the finger. Very important in pistol shooting, particularly with non-adjustable sights. Probably not so important with a rifle, but I am not a precision rifle shooter so I really don't know.

Now I will let you in on a little secret. In CAS, I am shooting my pistols fairly fast, and I am probably pulling the triggers with the crease, not the pad. Just habit. I learned a long time ago to aim at the right half of the target, because most of my misses were over to the left. But CAS is not a precision game, the targets are pretty big, and it does not matter where you hit them, just as long as you don't miss.

If any of you tells this to anybody I will deny it.
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Old Today, 08:40 PM   #24
Cossack
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Does anyone know if anyone makes pair of checkered rubber grips that would fit my gun?

Last edited by Cossack; Today at 09:09 PM.
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Old Today, 09:04 PM   #25
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Cossack - before you starting messing with your sights - don't assume it is the sights that are making you hit left. A lot of things can affect the windage.

Are you shooting two handed? Or traditional single handed hold? Either way - it's not much different than with any handgun. Lots of times it is not the sights - it's your hold. If a 45 Colt is new to you then you need to put quite a few rounds down range to get used to your handgun. Are you anticipating discharge/recoil? Are you gripping the plow handle the same each time?

And remember - different loads will shoot differently. If you are going to reload - you can work up a load that works well and stick with it as you will pretty much know POA in regards to POI. If you are using store bought - you won't or might not get the same ammo each time - thus your POA and POI may differ.

In reality - when that 7 1/2" goes off - you are getting some muzzle rise with the end of the barrel as the slug is pushed down the tube and it leaves. That is pretty easy to get used to. Windage - that may take some time.

As an example - I shoot a lot of SAA and vintage DA Smiths. When I picked up a Smith 9mm Shield to change off on my CCW carry with my Smith 36 snub - I had a lot of issues with my hits going left. But, I knew it was me and not the handgun and as it turned out - after 300 rounds or so downrange - my grip was adjusted which took care of the windage problem.

Don't get discouraged - pretty soon that dogleg will be like an extension of your arm and it will hit where you point it. I have one like yours and I mostly shoot 255 gr RPFN out of it - traditional slug. All I shoot are reloads. Sometimes I use a 230 gr. RNFP. Both shoot differently as far as POA and POI. When I do have a windage issue - I can easily chalk it up to operator error as I know as soon as I pull the trigger whether it's going left or right instead of center.

Of all my calibers that I reload, the 45 Colt is my favorite. Just something about that old traditional round and those blunt nosed lead slugs. Your revolver is a nice looking one! Enjoy and have fun and just get some rounds under you belt before you start to alter anything as far as sights. It's not that sights can't be off - even on original Colts it was not uncommon to bend a front sight either left or right to compensate. But I'm a firm believer that once you know "how" your revolver shoots and where it hits, you can easily adjust the windage with your POA to compensate the same as elevation for the distances you are shooting. And practice at uncommon distances - not just 25 yards, 50 yards, etc. Realistic shooting is at different distances so as you continue to get used to your individual SAA, you'll be able to adjust your sight picture for the odd distances.

Have fun and enjoy! The only thing that distances you from Wyatt Earp or Bat Masterson is time . . . you still on even gourd with them as far as what's in your hand!
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