The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: The Revolver Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old November 8, 2014, 04:51 PM   #1
barnbwt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 17, 2012
Posts: 741
Any Manurhin Fans?

Just yesterday my new-well-used MR73 finally arrived, and just as I'd expected, it's a very impressive piece, even as clapped out as it is (more on that later). I see the occasional mention of various people owning/have owned one, but I was curious if anyone is actively shooting these with regularity. I plan on shooting mine a lot, after all.

My example is a pretty well worn, but not as bad as I'd expect for a gun with a likely +30 year service history, that was also likely used frequently for training if nothing else. It's a Century import, so likely one of the German "FBI-equivalent" trade in service guns. The bluing is completely worn at the sides of the muzzle and cylinder corners, but is more or less still present everywhere else (not bad for a ton of holster duty), and more importantly, nothing is actually rounded with wear. Lots of surfaces scratches, but no rust of any sort, and you can readily tell that at one time the bluing was immaculate (still is in the sheltered nooks & crannies). Hammer and trigger are still straw colored. The attached photo of the left side (sheltered side) shows the bluing much better than the right which has a lot more surface scratches covering it.

As I'd expected from reviews and research, the trigger pulls are quite excellent on these guns. Heavy, but short and smooth DA, and a ridiculously short SA trigger that is nearly rifle-like. As far as small fixed service sights go, I actually like the sight picture a lot (three equal square blocks with a little daylight between them), even if I'd prefer them to be a bit larger for shooting. Mine has the big, ugly rubber grips that are a little slippery, but feel as comfortable as the Hogue's on my S&W. The shooting posture is a little different with your hand a bit further back than on a S&W (not quite like a Bisley, but getting there). Weight seems quite reasonable, balance seems very similar to my much-larger N-Frame TRR8 (which has an aluminum frame) so recoil should be very pleasant. Even though DA is heavier, it is so much shorter than a Smith that you can pull the trigger really fast without moving the gun very much.

Main detractors are a few dings on the lug below the muzzle that appear to have been from the gun being dropped onto concrete/stone at one point (crown is okay, though), the upper side plate screw is absent (still two others holding it on, but they're a little buggered up), and one of the extractor star pins (think older S&W's) has apparently worked itself out and is gone. Mechanically, there is nearly imperceptible end shake (not surprising for a forged frame as massive as a cast Ruger's), the crane/yoke is solid, as is the extractor star and its front/back latch/detent. The potential problem, if it can be so called, is the bolt and bolt stops are a bit peened/worn, allowing about .04" of side play (total) side to side when engaged. The notches are still sharp/orthogonal, but the mating faces are pushed back, raising small burrs on the notches and bolt that can just barely catch a fingernail. It seems like the original play would be about half what it is now (so like .01" of wear/peening each on the bolt and notches)

The amount of play is less than my as-new S&W TRR8 which shoots fine, so I'm not concerned about safety, but the little burrs have caused a weird wear pattern in the cylinder blue (a constant line from the initial operation, and a more recent interrupted line that kind of zig zags to either side from where the raised burr now contacts the cylinder). This gun is definitely a silk purse that's been thrown into the Sow's pen for decades, so I think it'd be a good candidate for refinishing/repair into a go-to carry gun. But I'd want to do something about the bolt/timing, if nothing else smoothing off those burrs.

Have any Manurhin owner's out there who might have encountered similar issues ever replaced the bolt with a wider version to take up some of the extra slop, or would that be likely to induce timing issues on the other cylinders? At least on mine, the wear/peening appears very constant (as is the amount of play at each cylinder). I think the main reason I'd want to tighten that up would simply be to milk a little more accuracy from the barrel (which still looks new despite an obviously well-used breechface). In DA, I can readily state without firing that it'll be more accurate than my Smith; the 'stacking' is quite different, and the MR73 feels like it gets a much lighter pull as the trigger breaks. SA trigger is heavier and both have over-travel screws, so the Smith probably still wins there, simply because I don't practice near as much dry-fire as I probably should

TCB
Attached Images
File Type: jpg PB080019.JPG (207.5 KB, 117 views)
File Type: jpg PB080020.JPG (185.0 KB, 88 views)
File Type: jpg PB080015small.jpg (217.0 KB, 81 views)
__________________
"I don't believe that the men of the distant past were any wiser than we are today. But it does seem that their science and technology were able to accomplish much grander things."
-- Alex Rosewater
barnbwt is online now  
Old November 8, 2014, 05:05 PM   #2
Venom1956
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 4, 2008
Location: WI
Posts: 3,070
nice shame that import mark is so hideous, gun looks great!
__________________
E-Shock rounds are engineered to expend maximum energy into soft targets, turning the density mass into an expanding rotational cone of NyTrilium matrix particles, causing neurological collapse to the central nervous system.- Yeah I can do that.
I guarantee you will know it if a bicyclist hits your house going 1000 mph.
Venom1956 is offline  
Old November 8, 2014, 05:08 PM   #3
MrBorland
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 31, 2007
Location: NC
Posts: 1,891
Nice. Congrats.

I've never seen one in person, let alone shot one, but yeah, I'm a fan. I'd snap it up pronto if I ever came across one for sale.
MrBorland is offline  
Old November 8, 2014, 05:20 PM   #4
lee n. field
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 12, 2002
Location: The same state as Mordor.
Posts: 3,414
Where'd you get this? Available at one of the surplus distributors? What did it cost?
__________________
"As was the man of dust, so also are those who are of the dust, and as is the man of heaven, so also are those who are of heaven. Just as we have borne the image of the man of dust, we shall also bear the image of the man of heaven. "
lee n. field is online now  
Old November 8, 2014, 10:41 PM   #5
Sevens
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 28, 2007
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 9,112
I've only seen & handled one, but I was duly impressed. I know nothing about these, but the one I handled was close to minty (not completely mint) and the dealer had it at $1900 and firm. That was two months ago.

One in the condition you describe & show pics? Oh, that's really exactly the one I'd want -- totally usable with much of the collector value stripped off it. I'd love a shot at that and am also on the edge of my seat to hear the price.
__________________
Attention Brass rats and other reloaders: I really need .327 Federal Magnum brass, no lot size too small. Tell me what caliber you need and I'll see what I have to swap. PM me and we'll discuss.
Sevens is offline  
Old November 9, 2014, 10:01 AM   #6
Wishoot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 5, 2009
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 716
Allan's Armory has a few in stock.

http://www.allans-armory.com/aaresult.php?PageId=58
Wishoot is offline  
Old November 9, 2014, 01:09 PM   #7
barnbwt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 17, 2012
Posts: 741
If some additional info could be had with those revolvers (description of lockup quality, mainly), those are actually pretty good prices; a bit less than I paid, but mine looks to have probably at least 80% blue remaining (nearly the whole gun is blue; a scratched and dull blue, but blue nonetheless )

The cylinder stop marks look better than on mine (simple lines) which might at least suggest less peening has occurred so far. I'll have to keep those guys in mind (I kinda want a second one of these guns, now )

TCB
__________________
"I don't believe that the men of the distant past were any wiser than we are today. But it does seem that their science and technology were able to accomplish much grander things."
-- Alex Rosewater
barnbwt is online now  
Old November 9, 2014, 01:28 PM   #8
barnbwt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 17, 2012
Posts: 741
Yeah, Century really took a bat to these guns at the direction of the ATF...

Mine looks a lot worse than it is since the metal was raised by the stamp (at least it's not one of those awful dot-matrix stamps), so the letters "glimmer" more. I'd have that stoned flat in refinishing, and blued darker. I suspect the letters would vanish, much like the MR73 factory marking on the barrel does.

FWIW, I bought mine on Gunbroker recently. I wouldn't have paid as much (at the time) had I known about AA's offerings, but that's only because I had no first-hand experience with the guns or this example's condition. I'd go cheap initially to hedge my losses :P, but the gun I have is definitely worth what I paid; it looks to be in much better overall condition than those from AA (maybe with the exclusion of the cylinder/bolt condition; I only see one turn line on those)

Beware of the "MR73's" for sale on GB and abroad; a lot of them are the cast frame F1 models Manurhin made in conjunction with Ruger, and they're basically Single Sixes with some minor-ish changes and basically the same build quality (not nearly as nice as the MR73). I'm sure they're good guns, and probably a decent score at 400$, but definitely not the same thing.

TCB
__________________
"I don't believe that the men of the distant past were any wiser than we are today. But it does seem that their science and technology were able to accomplish much grander things."
-- Alex Rosewater
barnbwt is online now  
Old November 9, 2014, 01:33 PM   #9
Sevens
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 28, 2007
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 9,112
Those Ruger look-alikes was EXACTLY what I saw when I ran a search for them on Gunbroker soon after seeing this thread last night.

Also -- can someone offer of phonetic spelling of Manurhin, or tips on pronunciation?
__________________
Attention Brass rats and other reloaders: I really need .327 Federal Magnum brass, no lot size too small. Tell me what caliber you need and I'll see what I have to swap. PM me and we'll discuss.
Sevens is offline  
Old November 9, 2014, 01:55 PM   #10
lee n. field
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 12, 2002
Location: The same state as Mordor.
Posts: 3,414
Quote:
can someone offer of phonetic spelling of Manurhin, or tips on pronunciation?
I've heard it pronounced (Grant Cunningham on The Gun Nation podcast) pronounced man-uh-rin.
__________________
"As was the man of dust, so also are those who are of the dust, and as is the man of heaven, so also are those who are of heaven. Just as we have borne the image of the man of dust, we shall also bear the image of the man of heaven. "
lee n. field is online now  
Old November 9, 2014, 01:57 PM   #11
Sevens
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 28, 2007
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 9,112
Good info.

There's a Beavis-type in me that wants to work "manure" in there, but I really do want to own one of these and as fun as that might be, it's counter-productive. But that doesn't mean I won't do it!
__________________
Attention Brass rats and other reloaders: I really need .327 Federal Magnum brass, no lot size too small. Tell me what caliber you need and I'll see what I have to swap. PM me and we'll discuss.
Sevens is offline  
Old November 9, 2014, 02:37 PM   #12
Model12Win
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 20, 2012
Posts: 683
Supposedly these were European police revolvers and they were shot very extensively with diets of full-power .357 loads.

I believe there was even a long-barreled version with a scope and bipod mount that was used as a "sniper" type revolver by the police, I kid you not! I'll see if I can find a pic.
Model12Win is online now  
Old November 9, 2014, 02:39 PM   #13
Model12Win
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 20, 2012
Posts: 683
Here we go:



Strange, but cool!
Model12Win is online now  
Old November 9, 2014, 05:12 PM   #14
wogpotter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 27, 2004
Posts: 3,359
They were also the preferred sidearm of the French CT units like DST & SEDECE. Those guys trained a lot with full house ammo.
__________________
Allan Quatermain: “Automatic rifles. Who in God's name has automatic rifles”?

Elderly Hunter: “That's dashed unsporting. Probably Belgium.”
wogpotter is offline  
Old November 9, 2014, 05:21 PM   #15
wogpotter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 27, 2004
Posts: 3,359
Quote:
can someone offer of phonetic spelling of Manurhin, or tips on pronunciation?
3 labels, all kind of run in together no obvious transition from one to another.
MAN ( opposite of woman)
hOOO Very soft "h" like an owl hoot, you could even say "Oooo"
RAN as in RAN a race.

almost (but not quite)Man-you ran.
__________________
Allan Quatermain: “Automatic rifles. Who in God's name has automatic rifles”?

Elderly Hunter: “That's dashed unsporting. Probably Belgium.”

Last edited by wogpotter; November 10, 2014 at 04:42 PM.
wogpotter is offline  
Old November 9, 2014, 07:50 PM   #16
barnbwt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 17, 2012
Posts: 741
On lifesizepotato's (who I expect to chime in when he notices the thread, with his gorgeous near mint commercial MR73) review, it was pronounced mahn-You-wen, or something Frenchy like that

Allan's Armory got back with me (within minutes, and on a Sunday, no less ) with a couple close ups, and at least the one I looked at exhibited similar peening of the cylinder notches, but not enough at the bolt to affect the turn line (so I suspect very close to the same condition for most of these, with holster wear being the main distinction. For what you are getting, I'd say 600$ is a steal, but that's coming from a guy who values mechanical novelty and relative obscurity above most things. I'll probably grab one just so I have no worries about replacement parts, when the gun fund replenishes.

TCB
__________________
"I don't believe that the men of the distant past were any wiser than we are today. But it does seem that their science and technology were able to accomplish much grander things."
-- Alex Rosewater
barnbwt is online now  
Old November 9, 2014, 08:26 PM   #17
Model12Win
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 20, 2012
Posts: 683
If I remember correctly these guns were used for a many a year, even after most US police departments stopped using revolvers in the 1980s.
Model12Win is online now  
Old November 9, 2014, 10:40 PM   #18
barnbwt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 17, 2012
Posts: 741
Yeah, I believe it was the 90's when they finally switched over. Also keep in mind the MR73 was joined by the F1 starting in '84 (meaning production stopped before then), so these MR73's really were in service for a good while. I was actually quite impressed to see the cylinder stop wear, which I'd expected for guns with umpteen thousands of rounds through them, but no noticeable end shake; these frames are crazy strong. That the cranes are still tight is pretty amazing, too, since I doubt they were babied in/out during training (or when police tripped/dropped/banged the holstered guns into stuff). That the bore still looks new is simply incredible.

Not saying the S&W's aren't strong or anything, but it sure seems like there's a lot more 38spl trade in guns out there than 357's. Not sure if that's just my imagination, production numbers, or if the 357's really do get clapped out beyond repair.

TCB
__________________
"I don't believe that the men of the distant past were any wiser than we are today. But it does seem that their science and technology were able to accomplish much grander things."
-- Alex Rosewater
barnbwt is online now  
Old November 10, 2014, 02:59 PM   #19
lifesizepotato
Member
 
Join Date: January 2, 2011
Posts: 39
Quote:
On lifesizepotato's (who I expect to chime in when he notices the thread, with his gorgeous near mint commercial MR73) review, it was pronounced mahn-You-wen, or something Frenchy like that
You rang, monsieur?

The French pronunciation is closest to MAH-nyoo-RAHN, with a French guttural R and the nasal N at the end that you barely pronounce. To sound less snooty, but still close, I personally say ma-nyoo-ren.

Anyway, I'm a big fan. I think a good MR73 is the best 357 ever made, and I say that as someone who owns a Korth, 50s Python and Registered Magnum. Here's my 5.25" commercial model with a couple MR93s.



The surplus ones that have been for sale range from horribly abused claptraps to very nice revolvers that are 90% of a mint commercial gun. I had two surplus examples for a while, and the better of the two was a very good gun indeed, with most of the high-polish finish remaining and good condition grips. The action was still tight and, while it didn't quite convey the awesomeness of my commercial gun, it was still an excellent revolver worth some money.
lifesizepotato is offline  
Old November 10, 2014, 03:03 PM   #20
Sevens
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 28, 2007
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 9,112
Better than a Korth?!

Man, I wanna get my hands on one!
(well, to be fair, I really wish to test drive a Korth also)
__________________
Attention Brass rats and other reloaders: I really need .327 Federal Magnum brass, no lot size too small. Tell me what caliber you need and I'll see what I have to swap. PM me and we'll discuss.
Sevens is offline  
Old November 10, 2014, 03:08 PM   #21
lifesizepotato
Member
 
Join Date: January 2, 2011
Posts: 39
Quote:
Better than a Korth?!
There's a je ne sais quoi about the Manurhin that's hard to explain. It just has more soul or personality in some ways than the Korth, which feels like it was designed to be perfekt by bearded German scientists in a lab. Both are incredible revolvers, taking the #1 and #2 spots on the pyramid thanks to fabulous build quality, indestructible strength, superlative accuracy, and perfect actions, but the MR73 just has a little something else. IMO, of course.
lifesizepotato is offline  
Old November 11, 2014, 05:34 PM   #22
barnbwt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 17, 2012
Posts: 741
"Better than a Korth?!"

<faints>

Looking solely at the price tag of a Korth, I confidently proclaim them "finely distilled diminishing returns" as far as design. A kind of functionally needless (compared to even the very next best offering that is all but numerically equal to the superior breed) achievement that is mostly notable as a technical or philosophical exercise of human ability. The ridiculous dimensional tolerances held on the Parthenon (for absolutely no reason other than the Geeks thought it was cool) at enormous expense are another example. Yes, a more finely crafted government building will never be, but the local grey DMV works just as well for shading bureaucrats

The main thing the craftsmanship of the Korth offers, is justification for even more expense being lavished upon it in the form of exotic metals, processes, or artistry. A completely bedazzled Korth 'makes sense,' whereas a similarly embroidered Colt strikes me as shallowly flamboyant. Knowing the care and skill expressed on the outside can only at best equal that on the interior does carry an artistic significance all its own. An artistic significance that also happens to be very practical at delivering lead on target, unlike most all others

"There's a je ne sais quoi about the Manurhin that's hard to explain. It just has more soul or personality in some ways than the Korth"
It's for sure got more soul than my S&W TRR8. That thing is loads of cool, but is about as deep as the latest Call of Duty. This MR73 makes me wonder if the ding at the end of the underlug was from pavement, or a criminal's tooth . Honestly, it seems more film noir-ey (and not just because it's French, though that helps ) than old 38's that actually existed back then. Quintessential "cop gun"

Just funny that it happens to be French

TCB
__________________
"I don't believe that the men of the distant past were any wiser than we are today. But it does seem that their science and technology were able to accomplish much grander things."
-- Alex Rosewater

Last edited by barnbwt; November 11, 2014 at 05:42 PM.
barnbwt is online now  
Old November 11, 2014, 06:26 PM   #23
prm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 16, 2008
Posts: 101
Never had a Manurhin revolver, but if they are anything like their Walthers they're in a class all their own.
prm is offline  
Old November 13, 2014, 05:29 PM   #24
Jeff #111
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 25, 2001
Location: Idaho
Posts: 944
I believe mine is one of the Austrian police surplus models shipped into the states in the 90's when the Austrian police went to semi-autos. Picked it up about four years ago. It's seen some use, but it's a good shooter and mechanically very clean.



__________________
Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who didn't. Ben Franklin
Jeff #111 is offline  
Old November 14, 2014, 09:22 AM   #25
barnbwt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 17, 2012
Posts: 741
Nice, yours has the target sights, too
__________________
"I don't believe that the men of the distant past were any wiser than we are today. But it does seem that their science and technology were able to accomplish much grander things."
-- Alex Rosewater
barnbwt is online now  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.13830 seconds with 10 queries