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Old January 31, 2016, 12:16 PM   #1
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What revolvers did S&W put names on?

We all know that many S&W revolvers have names, as well as model numbers.

Here's the question, what S&W revolvers have the names ON them? On the barrel, to be specific.

The only one that comes to my mind is the "Highway Patrolman". Are there any others?? Guns MARKED with the name (on the barrel)??

"Airweight" and "Target" are, as far as I can see, applied to more than one model, or variant, so are not "names" in the same sense as Highway Patrolman.

Chief Special, Combat Masterpiece, Combat Magnum, Highway Patrolman, M&P, maybe some others I can't recall right now, these are all names, but only Highway Patrolman seems to have been marked ON the guns, as well as used in the literature.

ANY OTHERS???

(and, just to be clear, the model numbers are "names" BUT they aren't the names I'm talking about)
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Old January 31, 2016, 12:24 PM   #2
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.357 Magnum
Yes, that was the gun's name in olden times.
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Old January 31, 2016, 12:28 PM   #3
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Smith and Wesson Judge.

That's the only one that I can think of with just a name. The rest are named after calibers. I.e. 460xvr, .500 magnum etc...
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Old January 31, 2016, 12:51 PM   #4
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With the exception of the Highway Patrolman, the old S&W revolver names were not put on the guns themselves. The .357 Magnum was marked that but as part of the cartridge name, not as the name of the gun.

In recent years, names have been put on the guns, usually with little connection to the model that originally was given that name.

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Old January 31, 2016, 01:12 PM   #5
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Ladysmith

Oops, not on the barrel but on the frame.
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Old January 31, 2016, 07:29 PM   #6
Jim Watson
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The .357 Magnum was marked that but as part of the cartridge name, not as the name of the gun.
I was prepared to debate that because the "S&W .357 Magnum" revolver (later Model 27) is not roll marked "Ctg" as are standard calibers like ".38 S&W Special Ctg" and .22 Long Rifle Ctg." Even the Highway Patrolman is marked ".357 Ctg." beside the "Highway Patrolman" stamp.
Then I saw the "S&W .44 Magnum", no "Ctg" either. OK that gun is the .44 Magnum, that is its name right on the barrel.

Then it all fell apart. The Combat Magnum and the Distinguished Combat Magnum are ALSO roll marked simply "S&W .357 Magnum" without the "Ctg" either. I now figure that "S&W .357 Magnum" is a registered trademark and they have to show it that way.

Quote:
With the exception of the Highway Patrolman, the old S&W revolver names were not put on the guns themselves.
.45 Cal Model 1955
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Old January 31, 2016, 07:37 PM   #7
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.45 Cal Model 1955
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Old January 31, 2016, 10:41 PM   #8
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I just went to look at my S&W's. Not seeing any names (as prescribed). I see Airweight on a couple, Performance Center, but no name and no model #s.
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Old January 31, 2016, 11:05 PM   #9
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Didn't they do the "Mountain Gun".......... Some sort of 44 Mag?
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Old February 1, 2016, 11:24 AM   #10
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I've always disliked the new designations, such as Model 586 or Model 36, etc. Much preferred Centenniel, Combat Magnum, 1950 Military,etc. over the "Model No.xx".

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Old February 1, 2016, 11:40 AM   #11
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There is a model 629 .44 Mag...that has "Trail Boss" on the frame - not the barrel...
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Old February 1, 2016, 07:43 PM   #12
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It's not on the barrel but its the only one I have the Thunder Ranch.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Thunder ranch 44 sp.jpg (181.1 KB, 20 views)
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Old February 1, 2016, 10:23 PM   #13
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I am not sure what can be said about the Mountain Guns and the Mountain Lights. The Mountain Gun came in several different Model Numbers and numerous calibers. It is almost like an enhancement name and a descriptor. They had certain features that were standard. Maybe they were akin to the Target Model revolvers and etc.

There is the Terrier, Chief's Special before it became the Model 36, and others that have been mentioned to include the Victory Model. I am a little blurry on all this too.

Then we also have all the coined phrases like the Pre-Victory, Pre-Model 10 and so on. Then there are the Pre-War and Post war dealing more with time periods vs. anything else.

Some of the early S&W revolvers were named the New Departure while commonly referred to as the Lemon Squeezer.

I know I am only touching on a few. There is also something else out there referred to the Kit Gun(s).
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Old February 2, 2016, 10:27 AM   #14
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"Pre-Model 10" and such was never one of S&W's names. The Model 10 was the Military & Police Model.

Such names as ".357 Magnum", "Highway Patrolman" and "Combat Masterpiece" conjour up the image of the gun in my mind much quicker than Model 27, or Model 28 does.

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Old February 2, 2016, 11:06 AM   #15
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Such names as ".357 Magnum", "Highway Patrolman" and "Combat Masterpiece" conjour up the image of the gun in my mind much quicker than Model 27, or Model 28 does.
Yeah. I always have to stop and think what model the K-38 became.

Model 14-3



Then again, I always get a kick out of folks who want to know when there 38 S&W SPECIAL CTG was made.
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Old February 2, 2016, 11:23 AM   #16
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Smith and Wesson Judge.

I've never heard of a S&W judge. Am I missing something interesting?
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Old February 2, 2016, 12:01 PM   #17
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Y'all are forgetting about the .38 Regulation Police; prewar examples were rollmarked "REGULATION POLICE" on the barrel.

Of course—not wanting to make things too consistent or easy to discern—S&W did not normally mark the .32 RP this way, and AFAIK they dropped the marking on postwar production except for the very limited run (~200?) of .38 Regulation Police Target Models that were built using leftover prewar parts. [Edit to add: The SCSW states that some postwar fixed-sight .38 RP's were also built using leftover prewar standard marked barrels.]
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Old February 2, 2016, 01:00 PM   #18
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Outdoorsman
Kit Gun
Heavy Duty
New Century
Military & Police
Chiefs Special
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Old February 2, 2016, 02:53 PM   #19
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As a matter of interest, the New Century revolver introduced the shrouded ejector rod, and this became sort of standard on "elite" S&W guns to this day. When the British objected to this lug, as it may get filled with mud and prevent closing of the cylinder, S&W shortened it to just the front locking lug.

Ever since, all S&W revolvers named, or hinted at, military or army or Military and Police, have had the short front lug.

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Old February 2, 2016, 03:05 PM   #20
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I do indeed see the actual printed title of the thread, I will not argue that... but I want to say that we could make somewhat of a case for "actual name of the model" if it was displayed on the box if not on the firearm itself.

Now I will run a bit out of the discussion area... but as a quick example, many or most of us are familiar with the legendary Smith & Wesson ".38 Master", and it would be hard to argue that the semi-automatic .38 Special pistol wasn't named the .38 Master... even though most folks know it better as the Model 52. When S&W dropped the blue two-piece box and moved to the one piece... I think that is when the printed moniker of .38 Master ceased to exist. But perhaps not in the glossy catalog?

This is an interesting topic of discussion, and like most topics of this nature, I always learn a few really cool things from you guys. I hope to hear a few more.

And I will begrudgingly add one revolver just to keep my post in line with the revolver forum:

Don't know if it's the actual name or if it's simply the dumbest phrase S&W ever got the thumbs-up to etch in to the barrel of a revolver. But the big stainless 8-shot N-frame .357 Magnum says ".357 Mag -- Eight Times" on the barrel and I could fill a whole paragraph of my own descriptors of that... precious few of which would escape the clutches of the decency filter. Suffice to say, I think it was a silly thing to stamp on the barrel of a revolver.
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Old February 2, 2016, 05:47 PM   #21
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As a matter of interest, the New Century revolver introduced the shrouded ejector rod, and this became sort of standard on "elite" S&W guns to this day. When the British objected to this lug, as it may get filled with mud and prevent closing of the cylinder, S&W shortened it to just the front locking lug.

Ever since, all S&W revolvers named, or hinted at, military or army or Military and Police, have had the short front lug.
Howdy

That is not quite how it happened, or at least that is not the whole story. The New Century, also known as the 44 Hand Ejector First Model, was designed to chamber a new cartridge called the 44 S&W Special.






The 44 Special was basically the same as the earlier 44 Russian round, except the 44 Special brass was about 3/16" longer than the older 44 Russian brass. This meant the new round could hold about 26 grains of Black Powder, vs the 23 grains of the Russian round. S&W felt the new revolver should be designed for 'maximum tightness and positive alignment of the cylinder'*. So they incorporated a distinctive third latch positioned where the yoke meets the frame, in addition to the standard latches at the front of the extractor rod and the rear of the cylinder. Because of this unique third latch, the New Century revolver popularly became known as the Triple Lock.

Here are some photos showing the details of the third latch.











The shroud was necessary for the third latch to function, because it housed some of the parts. The Triple Lock and the 44 Special cartridge were first introduced in 1908. The list price for the Triple Lock was $21. Sales were slow, only about 2,200 Triple Locks were sold per year, with a total of 15,375 being sold by 1915. At that time, Smith decided to eliminate the third lock, allowing the price of the 44 Hand Ejector Second Model to drop to $19 per unit.

44 Hand Ejector Second Model




It may well be true that the British objected to the shrouded ejector rod, that is the first time I heard that. But S&W dropped the fancy third latch, never to make one again, to save cost, and because it was not really necessary. The third latch was very expensive to make, and latching at the front of the extractor rod and rear of the cylinder is really all that was needed.



During production of the 2nd Model, S&W received numerous inquiries asking for a 44 Hand Ejector with a shrouded ejector rod. The company rebuffed these inquiries, saying that there was not enough demand to warrant tooling up for a new barrel. But in 1926, Wolf & Klar of Fort Worth placed an order for 3,500 44 Hand Ejectors, specifying a shrouded extractor rod. So Smith and Wesson put the shroud back under the barrel for the 44 Hand Ejector Third Model, also known as the Wolf & Klar model. Of course the third latch was missing, the shroud merely added weight to the front of the gun and protected the extractor rod.





Ever since that time, yes the shrouded extractor rod has been reserved for the 'better' Smiths.


* The History of Smith and Wesson by Roy Jinks
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Old February 2, 2016, 07:26 PM   #22
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It may well be true that the British objected to the shrouded ejector rod, that is the first time I heard that.
I have heard that as well, but no idea where. I thought it had attained "conventional wisdom" status.
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Old February 2, 2016, 09:19 PM   #23
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I believe it was in Keith's Sixguns by Keith book where he stated the British Purchasing Commission objected to the third lock and full length shroud. Seems that's where I read that.

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Old February 2, 2016, 11:52 PM   #24
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Thanks for the reference, Bob. I looked it up. Keith says "with the start of World War I, the encased ejector lug was eliminated due to some army authorities claiming it would fill with mud".

He also goes on to mention how he was instrumental in getting the Magna style grip created.

Whatever the reason for eliminating the third lock and its shroud, Roy Jinks does state that Smith was able to charge 2 dollars less for the 2nd Model than the 1sdt Model, because of the elimination of the third latch.
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Old February 3, 2016, 12:09 PM   #25
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At one time Smith and Wesson had product names for all their revolvers. I.e Combat Masterpiece, Combat Magnum, military and police, Chiefs Special, Terrier, and so on. In 1958 Smith and Wesson eliminated names and went to an simpler model number system.

Mr. Watson is correct, the first PRODUCTION .357 Magnum revolvers were named the .357 Magnum.
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