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Old April 3, 2011, 02:14 AM   #1
exan
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slide stop release or slingshot on reload?

I've seen guys like Dave Sevigny, uses the slide stop release with his strong hand thumb finger after putting a fresh mag while the slide is locked on his Glocks and other guys use their weak hand thumb like Ben Stoeger on his Beretta. Does both method depends on what type of pistol one is using especially on IDPA matches. But some guys uses the slingshot method instead. What are your perference guys?
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Old April 3, 2011, 02:27 AM   #2
JohnKSa
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I use the slingshot method for the following reasons.

From what I can tell, it is slightly more reliable than using the slide release. I've had a gun that was crudded up so badly (I shot over 1000 rounds in a single range session) that it would no longer reliably feed the first round out of a full magazine when using the slide release but it operated faultlessly if I chambered that round using the slingshot method. The tiny bit of extra slide travel from the slingshot method was enough to provide enough extra chambering force to overcome the fouling issues that jammed the round if the slide release was used.

Not all semi-auto handguns have a slide release. In fact, one of the guns that occasionally does carry duty for me doesn't have a slide release. It makes sense for me to use a method that will work no matter which gun I'm using. It simplifies my training and practice.

The maker of at least one of my handguns advocates using the slingshot method instead of the slide release for chambering a round from the magazine.
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Old April 3, 2011, 07:57 AM   #3
Jim Watson
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Punching the slide stop is faster, racking the slide slingshot style is more certain IF you are careful to give it a good hard yank and LET IT GO. A soft slingshot riding the slide forward will give trouble.
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Old April 3, 2011, 11:21 AM   #4
g.willikers
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Using the slide release is faster, and the sling shot method is needed for malfunctions.
It's probably wise to be able to do both without fumbles.
I practice both ways.
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Old April 3, 2011, 01:29 PM   #5
spacecoast
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There was a poll on this a while back -

http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=408539
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Old April 3, 2011, 02:00 PM   #6
gunrobot
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for pure speed in competition? slidestop.

for reliable feeding and malfunction clearance for self defense or tactical, slingshot.
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Old April 3, 2011, 06:53 PM   #7
Don P
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Training with LE/range officers their method for instruction is to sling shot the slide. Their reasoning is if you should miss the slide stop lever YOU will look down at the gun taking you eyes off the target/BG then having to reacquire the target. I use the sling shot method shooting IDPA and USPSA and it works for me. Good sound thinking if you ask me because you don't have to look at the slide to pull it back and let it fly.
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Old April 3, 2011, 07:27 PM   #8
kraigwy
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I use the slide stop, it's faster and has awayls worked for me.
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Old April 3, 2011, 09:02 PM   #9
CatsEye
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Slide stop.
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Old April 3, 2011, 10:51 PM   #10
Navy joe
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Being left handed I just leave the knuckle of my trigger finger laying on the slide release as I seat the mag. No further action needed, it's stupid fast. I would, from a training perspective, advocate slingshot for it being a common manipulation for many firearms. If I picked up a strange gun, that's what I would do. I don't like slingshot for Beretta 92s, stupid slide mounted safety cause you problems if you inadvertently flick it on.
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Old April 3, 2011, 11:12 PM   #11
shooter_john
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Slide stop all the way. (Though I agree that you still have a slingshot technique buried somewhere in the muscle memory)

We teach slingshot at my LEA, but there are a few shooters who shoot more than at quarterly quals whom are allowed to use the slide stop. I find the slide stop to be tremendously faster, and I hit it with my firing thumb. (I shoot Glocks, righthanded)
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Old April 15, 2011, 08:48 PM   #12
FM12
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Slide stop for me, except tap rack bang.
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Old April 15, 2011, 11:00 PM   #13
oldkim
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compare apples to apples...

So, one limitation I haven't seen brought up is the combination of the firearm and the hand size that is operating it.

If the shooter is able to activate the slide release very easily without losing the grip or having to adjust their strong hand then you have two hands doing two things which would most often equate to faster operation... hence better for speed... better for competition.

Now if you can modify your firearm to address this then that's great. All my firearms are basically stock and I have small hands.

I teach the slingshot method for all shooters as it alleviates this issue for any firearm as it can be transferred from firearm to firearm regardless of what features the semi action firearm may have.

So if I had to choose one - it would be slingshot. But you'll have to find specifically what works for you as we are all different.
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Old May 5, 2011, 12:30 PM   #14
tuj
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For speed, for life-and-death, slide stop.

For fun shooting, slow shooting, using the slingshot method. The reason is that the slide stop will eventually wear the slide notch. This happens more on some guns than others, but will eventually happen on all. Ruger MK's are a good example where its better to slingshot for wear reasons.
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Old May 7, 2011, 05:53 PM   #15
Navy joe
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On the life and death thing, many tactical trainers train to the slingshot, just because it is a very common manual of arms to different guns and a gross motor skill. I would train a new shooter the same.
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